Question about Hoover HCA331FFK

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Refrigerator runs without stopping

And cools poorly. What can be done?

Posted by Anonymous on

  • rajpaul Mar 17, 2008

    our fridge is not defrostng automatiacally , the cooling is poor.The technica person has told that card and heater will have to be replaced ,the price of which is 1/3rd of total price of fridge,as told by him.

    may u please let me know if card is faulty,ith heater will also be.

  • jacquesnoir May 11, 2010

    Also a possible defective defrost element/defrost switch. Both will let the coils eventually fill with so much ice that there will be no air circulation, upon which the refrigerator compartment depends for cooling.



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  • 74 Answers

If the refrigerator's light works and you can hear it running but it cools poorly or runs without stopping, any of several problems may be at fault. First, make sure nothing is blocking the passageway between the freezer and refrigerator compartments--if airflow is restricted by, for example, a loaf of bread situated in front of the passageway, the refrigerator won't get cold. Be aware that a refrigerator will tend to run longer when it's full of food, the door is opened frequently, and the room temperature is hot. If your refrigerator runs without stopping (unless you turn it off), it may be low on refrigerant. Without a full charge, it cannot reach the low temperature that the cold control dial summons. More likely, it is a defrost problem in which a component in the automatic defrosting system is faulty. This could be a defrost heater, a defrost timer, or a defrost terminator. Before you call a repairperson, do the following: 1) Determine whether the refrigerator section is being cooled. If you see frost at the top of a "frost free" refrigerator even when the cold control is set low, it means the refrigerator probably has a full charge of refrigerant. If this is the case, the thermostat may be faulty or out of calibration. 2) Try turning the cold control both up and down. If the compressor doesn't shut off, the cold control may be broken. Call a repair person. During the repair, it is a good idea to have the defrost timer and heaters checked to ensure that they are working correctly. 3) Look at the condenser coils, located at the bottom of the refrigerator (behind the kick plate) or, in some cases, at the back. These coils disperse heat from inside the refrigerator out into the room with the aid of a fan. If the coils are dirty, the refrigerator won't operate efficiently, so clean them. 4) Make sure that the drain line under the evaporator coils, which goes to a pan underneath, is not plugged (water should drip into the pan when the refrigerator is defrosting). 5) To put off having the refrigerator repaired for a few days, you may be able to defrost it manually with a hair dryer-if you can access the cooling coils in the freezer section. Excessive moisture in the coils can turn into a frozen mass, reducing efficiency. Be very careful when using the hair dryer; do not stand in a puddle of water--there is a serious danger of electrical shock! Also be careful not to melt the plastic parts.

Posted on Jan 18, 2006

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Our new Dometic DM2852 will not stop running. Help!


Old solution from a forum but it get sense.
Citation: "It seems like there could be several possibilities:
1. Refrigerator is struggling to keep cool - maybe because of high outside temp, maybe bad seals, maybe other issues. Fan runs all the time because the back of the frig is hot.
2. Refrigerator is cooling ok, but fan runs all the time because there's poor ventilation on the back - maybe vents are blocked in some way.
3. Refrigerator is cooling ok, but fan runs all the time because it has a defective or improperly adjusted ventilation thermostat (that controls the fan).
4. Refrigerator is cooling ok, but fan runs all the time because Dometic did not include a thermostatic control on this model.

I'd suggest checking the manual or calling Dometic to ask about #4. If there is a thermostat controlling the fan, it may be covered under the Dometic warranty (which might be longer than 1 year)."

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GE Side-By-Side Refrigerator Stops Cooling


HI,

If the refrigerator isn't cool, you need to answer some questions, then see if the compressor is running.

First, answer these questions:

  • Is the refrigerator completely dead? If so, see “It's stopped completely.”


  • Is the thermostat knob turned to the proper setting? If not, reset it.


Next, see if the compressor motor is running

The compressor is a football-sized case with no apparent moving parts. It's on the outside of the refrigerator at the back near the bottom. If it is humming or making a continuous noise and your refrigerator is still not cooling, there may be a more serious problem with one or more of several different components, we recommend contacting a qualified appliance repair technician for further help.

If the compressor is not running but you do have power to the refrigerator, there may be a problem with one or more of these:

  • The compressor


  • The Thermostat


  • The overload, relay, or capacitor


  • The defrost timer


  • The condenser fan motor


Cooling is poor For an overall understanding of how refrigerators should work, read about refrigerators in the How Things Work section of our website. A refrigerator or freezer that is cooling, but cooling poorly, may have a problem in one of several areas:

Evaporator coils
Condenser
Poor cooling is often the result of a heavy frost build-up on the evaporator coils or a condenser that is clogged with dust, lint, and dirt.

Evaporator coils Poor cooling is often the result of a heavy frost build-up on the evaporator coils. You can't see these coils without removing a panel on the inside of your freezer. A sure sign that there is a build-up is the presence of any frost or ice build-up on the inside walls, floor, or ceiling of the freezer. Such a frost build-up usually indicates a problem in the self-defrosting system or damaged door gaskets.

The refrigerator is supposed to self-defrost approximately four times in every 24 hour period. If one of the components in the self-defrosting system fails, the refrigerator continues to try to cool. Eventually, though, so much frost builds up on the evaporator coils that the circulating fan can't draw air over the coils. There may still be a small amount of cooling because the coils are icy, but with no air flow over the coils, cooling in the refrigerator compartment is quite limited.

Here's an inexpensive, though inconvenient, way to determine if the problem is with the self-defrosting system. Remove all of the perishable food from the refrigerator and freezer, turn the thermostat in the refrigerator to Off, and leave the doors open for 24 to 48 hours. (Be sure to have several towels ready in case the melting frost and ice causes the drip pan to overflow). This allows the refrigerator to defrost "manually." When the frost and ice build-up has completely melted away, turn the thermostat back to a normal setting. If the refrigerator then cools properly, it indicates a problem with one of three components in the self-defrosting system:

  • The defrost timer


  • The defrost thermostat (also called the bi-metal switch)


  • The defrost heater


If it still does not cool properly, there may be a problem with the refrigerant level or the compressor. You may need to consult with a qualified appliance repair technician to further diagnose the problem

Condenser Self-defrosting refrigerators all have a set of coils and a cooling fan, usually under the refrigerator, that need to be cleaned regularly. If these coils get coated with dust, dirt or lint, the refrigerator may not cool properly. The coils may appear to be a thin, black, wide radiator-like device behind the lower kick-panel. To clean them, disconnect the refrigerator from the power source, use a refrigerator condenser brush (see the Appliance Accessories section) and your vacuum cleaner to clean the coils of any lint, pet hair, etc. You may not be able to get to all of the condenser from the front, it may be necessary to clean the remainder of the condenser from the rear of the refrigerator.
Goodluck..

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Corrosion is caused by the acidic flux used to make the solder flow. If the joints are bad, it is probably out of gas due to leaks.

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Black & decker refrigerator bna17b runs all the time. never shuts off. keeps thing cool, but always running.


If, the refrigerator, was working well at first, start and stop cyclically, when was new, the solution is to clean the internal fans, because having poor air circulation leads to the temperature sensor to a wrong reading

If not turned off since new, that's one was made in China and the control board has a bad factory solder, so the refrigerator starts to cause problems when the fans, that are working 24 hours at day, falling on wear or dirty then stop working , causing a lack of cooling and cracking the Peltier modules.

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Side by side refrig by kenmore and refrig running but not cooling. freezer is fine. checked settings.


Hello there:
If the refrigerator isn't cool, you need to answer some questions, then see if the compressor is running. First, answer these questions: Is the thermostat knob turned to the proper setting? If not, reset it. Next, see if the compressor motor is running The compressor is a football-sized case with no apparent moving parts. It's on the outside of the refrigerator at the back near the bottom. If it is humming or making a continuous noise and your refrigerator is still not cooling, there may be a more serious problem with one or more of several different components, we recommend contacting a qualified appliance repair technician for further help. If the compressor is not running but you do have power to the refrigerator, there may be a problem with one or more of these: The compressor The Thermostat The overload, relay, or capacitor The defrost timer The condenser fan motor Cooling is poor A refrigerator or freezer that is cooling, but cooling poorly, may have a problem in one of several areas: Poor cooling is often the result of a heavy frost build-up on the evaporator coils or a condenser that is clogged with dust, lint, and dirt.

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Refrigerator and freezer not cooling sufficiently, problem started without known cause, continues, have not tried to fix it


If the refrigerator isn't cool, you need to answer some questions, then see if the compressor is running.
First, answer these questions:
Is the refrigerator completely dead? If so, see “It's stopped completely.”
Is the thermostat knob turned to the proper setting? If not, reset it.
Next, see if the compressor motor is running
The compressor is a football-sized case with no apparent moving parts. It's on the outside of the refrigerator at the back near the bottom. If it is humming or making a continuous noise and your refrigerator is still not cooling, there may be a more serious problem with one or more of several different components, we recommend contacting a qualified appliance repair technician for further help.
If the compressor is not running but you do have power to the refrigerator, there may be a problem with one or more of these:

The compressor

The Thermostat

The overload, relay, or capacitor

The defrost timer

The condenser fan motor

Cooling is poor
For an overall understanding of how refrigerators should work, read about refrigerators in the How Things Work section of our website. A refrigerator or freezer that is cooling, but cooling poorly, may have a problem in one of several areas:

Poor cooling is often the result of a heavy frost build-up on the evaporator coils or a condenser that is clogged with dust, lint, and dirt.
Evaporator coils
Poor cooling is often the result of a heavy frost build-up on the evaporator coils. You can't see these coils without removing a panel on the inside of your freezer. A sure sign that there is a build-up is the presence of any frost or ice build-up on the inside walls, floor, or ceiling of the freezer. Such a frost build-up usually indicates a problem in the self-defrosting system or damaged door gaskets.
The refrigerator is supposed to self-defrost approximately four times in every 24 hour period. If one of the components in the self-defrosting system fails, the refrigerator continues to try to cool. Eventually, though, so much frost builds up on the evaporator coils that the circulating fan can't draw air over the coils. There may still be a small amount of cooling because the coils are icy, but with no air flow over the coils, cooling in the refrigerator compartment is quite limited.
Here's an inexpensive, though inconvenient, way to determine if the problem is with the self-defrosting system. Remove all of the perishable food from the refrigerator and freezer, turn the thermostat in the refrigerator to Off, and leave the doors open for 24 to 48 hours. (Be sure to have several towels ready in case the melting frost and ice causes the drip pan to overflow). This allows the refrigerator to defrost "manually." When the frost and ice build-up has completely melted away, turn the thermostat back to a normal setting. If the refrigerator then cools properly, it indicates a problem with one of three components in the self-defrosting system:
The defrost timer
The defrost thermostat (also called the bi-metal switch)
The defrost heater

to check these components .... please refer to my solution in the below link....

http://www.fixya.com/support/t4189238-defroster_not_working_checked_defrost

If it still does not cool properly, there may be a problem with the refrigerant level or the compressor. You may need to consult with a qualified appliance repair technician to further diagnose the problem
Condenser
Self-defrosting refrigerators all have a set of coils and a cooling fan, usually under the refrigerator, that need to be cleaned regularly. If these coils get coated with dust, dirt or lint, the refrigerator may not cool properly. The coils may appear to be a thin, black, wide radiator-like device behind the lower kick-panel. To clean them, disconnect the refrigerator from the power source, use a refrigerator condenser brush (see the Appliance Accessories section) and your vacuum cleaner to clean the coils of any lint, pet hair, etc. You may not be able to get to all of the condenser from the front, it may be necessary to clean the remainder of the condenser from the rear of the refrigerator.

If I've been of Help to you... kindly take a moment to rate this solution.

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1 Answer

Freezer wont freeze, compressor always running, refrigerator not cold


HI,

If the refrigerator isn't cool, you need to answer some questions, then see if the compressor is running.

First, answer these questions:

  • Is the refrigerator completely dead? If so, see “It's stopped completely.”


  • Is the thermostat knob turned to the proper setting? If not, reset it.


Next, see if the compressor motor is running

The compressor is a football-sized case with no apparent moving parts. It's on the outside of the refrigerator at the back near the bottom. If it is humming or making a continuous noise and your refrigerator is still not cooling, there may be a more serious problem with one or more of several different components, we recommend contacting a qualified appliance repair technician for further help.

If the compressor is not running but you do have power to the refrigerator, there may be a problem with one or more of these:

  • The compressor


  • The Thermostat


  • The overload, relay, or capacitor


  • The defrost timer


  • The condenser fan motor


Cooling is poor For an overall understanding of how refrigerators should work, read about refrigerators in the How Things Work section of our website. A refrigerator or freezer that is cooling, but cooling poorly, may have a problem in one of several areas:

Evaporator coils
Condenser
Poor cooling is often the result of a heavy frost build-up on the evaporator coils or a condenser that is clogged with dust, lint, and dirt.

Evaporator coils Poor cooling is often the result of a heavy frost build-up on the evaporator coils. You can't see these coils without removing a panel on the inside of your freezer. A sure sign that there is a build-up is the presence of any frost or ice build-up on the inside walls, floor, or ceiling of the freezer. Such a frost build-up usually indicates a problem in the self-defrosting system or damaged door gaskets.

The refrigerator is supposed to self-defrost approximately four times in every 24 hour period. If one of the components in the self-defrosting system fails, the refrigerator continues to try to cool. Eventually, though, so much frost builds up on the evaporator coils that the circulating fan can't draw air over the coils. There may still be a small amount of cooling because the coils are icy, but with no air flow over the coils, cooling in the refrigerator compartment is quite limited.

Here's an inexpensive, though inconvenient, way to determine if the problem is with the self-defrosting system. Remove all of the perishable food from the refrigerator and freezer, turn the thermostat in the refrigerator to Off, and leave the doors open for 24 to 48 hours. (Be sure to have several towels ready in case the melting frost and ice causes the drip pan to overflow). This allows the refrigerator to defrost "manually." When the frost and ice build-up has completely melted away, turn the thermostat back to a normal setting. If the refrigerator then cools properly, it indicates a problem with one of three components in the self-defrosting system:

  • The defrost timer


  • The defrost thermostat (also called the bi-metal switch)


  • The defrost heater


If it still does not cool properly, there may be a problem with the refrigerant level or the compressor. You may need to consult with a qualified appliance repair technician to further diagnose the problem

Condenser Self-defrosting refrigerators all have a set of coils and a cooling fan, usually under the refrigerator, that need to be cleaned regularly. If these coils get coated with dust, dirt or lint, the refrigerator may not cool properly. The coils may appear to be a thin, black, wide radiator-like device behind the lower kick-panel. To clean them, disconnect the refrigerator from the power source, use a refrigerator condenser brush (see the Appliance Accessories section) and your vacuum cleaner to clean the coils of any lint, pet hair, etc. You may not be able to get to all of the condenser from the front, it may be necessary to clean the remainder of the condenser from the rear of the refrigerator.

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1 Answer

Stopped cooling


First, check to see if the light comes on or if there is any fan, motor, or other sound coming from the appliance? If so, the refrigerator isn't really completely stopped--go to the specific problem you are having. If not, try adjusting the thermostat to a colder setting. If that doesn't work, read on.

Second, check to see if there is power getting to the refrigerator. To do that, plug a lamp or other device into the same outlet the refrigerator is plugged into. If there's no power, check the fuses or circuit breakers. If the fuses or breakers aren't the problem, contact a qualified electrician to restore power to the outlet.

If there is power to the appliance but it still seems to be stopped, there may be a problem in one or more of these:

  • Wiring

  • Thermostat

  • Defrost timer

  • Compressor

  • Overload and/or relay

Unfortunately, we can't describe all of the possible problems and repair solutions here. If you are unable to troubleshoot the problem from here, you may need to contact a qualified appliance repair technician.

It's not cool If the refrigerator isn't cool, you need to answer some questions, then see if the compressor is running.

First, answer these questions:

  • Is the refrigerator completely dead? If so, see “It's stopped completely.”

  • Is the thermostat knob turned to the proper setting? If not, reset it.

Next, see if the compressor motor is running

The compressor is a football-sized case with no apparent moving parts. It's on the outside of the refrigerator at the back near the bottom. If it is humming or making a continuous noise and your refrigerator is still not cooling, there may be a more serious problem with one or more of several different components, we recommend contacting a qualified appliance repair technician for further help.

If the compressor is not running but you do have power to the refrigerator, there may be a problem with one or more of these:

  • The compressor

  • The Thermostat

  • The overload, relay, or capacitor

  • The defrost timer

  • The condenser fan motor

Cooling is poor For an overall understanding of how refrigerators should work, read about refrigerators in the How Things Work section of our website. A refrigerator or freezer that is cooling, but cooling poorly, may have a problem in one of several areas:

Evaporator coils
Condenser
Poor cooling is often the result of a heavy frost build-up on the evaporator coils or a condenser that is clogged with dust, lint, and dirt.

Evaporator coils Poor cooling is often the result of a heavy frost build-up on the evaporator coils. You can't see these coils without removing a panel on the inside of your freezer. A sure sign that there is a build-up is the presence of any frost or ice build-up on the inside walls, floor, or ceiling of the freezer. Such a frost build-up usually indicates a problem in the self-defrosting system or damaged door gaskets.

The refrigerator is supposed to self-defrost approximately four times in every 24 hour period. If one of the components in the self-defrosting system fails, the refrigerator continues to try to cool. Eventually, though, so much frost builds up on the evaporator coils that the circulating fan can't draw air over the coils. There may still be a small amount of cooling because the coils are icy, but with no air flow over the coils, cooling in the refrigerator compartment is quite limited.

Here's an inexpensive, though inconvenient, way to determine if the problem is with the self-defrosting system. Remove all of the perishable food from the refrigerator and freezer, turn the thermostat in the refrigerator to Off, and leave the doors open for 24 to 48 hours. (Be sure to have several towels ready in case the melting frost and ice causes the drip pan to overflow). This allows the refrigerator to defrost "manually." When the frost and ice build-up has completely melted away, turn the thermostat back to a normal setting. If the refrigerator then cools properly, it indicates a problem with one of three components in the self-defrosting system:

  • The defrost timer

  • The defrost thermostat (also called the bi-metal switch)

  • The defrost heater

If it still does not cool properly, there may be a problem with the refrigerant level or the compressor. You may need to consult with a qualified appliance repair technician to further diagnose the problem

Condenser Self-defrosting refrigerators all have a set of coils and a cooling fan, usually under the refrigerator, that need to be cleaned regularly. If these coils get coated with dust, dirt or lint, the refrigerator may not cool properly. The coils may appear to be a thin, black, wide radiator-like device behind the lower kick-panel. To clean them, disconnect the refrigerator from the power source, use a refrigerator condenser brush (see the Appliance Accessories section) and your vacuum cleaner to clean the coils of any lint, pet hair, etc. You may not be able to get to all of the condenser from the front, it may be necessary to clean the remainder of the condenser from the rear of the refrigerator.


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Side by Side Kenmore Elite


Cooling is poor For an overall understanding of how refrigerators should work, read about refrigerators in the How Things Work section of our website. A refrigerator or freezer that is cooling, but cooling poorly, may have a problem in one of several areas:

Evaporator coils
Condenser
Poor cooling is often the result of a heavy frost build-up on the evaporator coils or a condenser that is clogged with dust, lint, and dirt.

Evaporator coils Poor cooling is often the result of a heavy frost build-up on the evaporator coils. You can't see these coils without removing a panel on the inside of your freezer. A sure sign that there is a build-up is the presence of any frost or ice build-up on the inside walls, floor, or ceiling of the freezer. Such a frost build-up usually indicates a problem in the self-defrosting system or damaged door gaskets.

The refrigerator is supposed to self-defrost approximately four times in every 24 hour period. If one of the components in the self-defrosting system fails, the refrigerator continues to try to cool. Eventually, though, so much frost builds up on the evaporator coils that the circulating fan can't draw air over the coils. There may still be a small amount of cooling because the coils are icy, but with no air flow over the coils, cooling in the refrigerator compartment is quite limited.

Here's an inexpensive, though inconvenient, way to determine if the problem is with the self-defrosting system. Remove all of the perishable food from the refrigerator and freezer, turn the thermostat in the refrigerator to Off, and leave the doors open for 24 to 48 hours. (Be sure to have several towels ready in case the melting frost and ice causes the drip pan to overflow). This allows the refrigerator to defrost "manually." When the frost and ice build-up has completely melted away, turn the thermostat back to a normal setting. If the refrigerator then cools properly, it indicates a problem with one of three components in the self-defrosting system:

  • The defrost timer

  • The defrost thermostat (also called the bi-metal switch)

  • The defrost heater

If it still does not cool properly, there may be a problem with the refrigerant level or the compressor. You may need to consult with a qualified appliance repair technician to further diagnose the problem

Condenser Self-defrosting refrigerators all have a set of coils and a cooling fan, usually under the refrigerator, that need to be cleaned regularly. If these coils get coated with dust, dirt or lint, the refrigerator may not cool properly. The coils may appear to be a thin, black, wide radiator-like device behind the lower kick-panel. To clean them, disconnect the refrigerator from the power source, use a refrigerator condenser brush (see the Appliance Accessories section) and your vacuum cleaner to clean the coils of any lint, pet hair, etc. You may not be able to get to all of the condenser from the front, it may be necessary to clean the remainder of the condenser from the rear of the refrigerator.

if this helps please vote me a fix ya

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