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60Hz hum - Advent AV190

Hi,

I have an Advent AV190 system that has functioned very well for a long time. Suddenly it developed what I would term a constant 60 Hz hum. I checked all signal grounding and everything was fine, so my first thought was faulty smoothing in the power supply.

I found that it had 2 supplies: one for the bass system and another for the small speaker system. Lo and behold there was a smoothing capacitor that broken away from the print at one end. I thought that was it and replaced it, but it made no difference.

I suppose I could go on and replace all of the smoothing capacitors, but it may be something else? I have checked the diodes that form both the bridge rectifiers and they are O.K.

My question is, does anyone happen to have a copy of the circuit diagram or schematic. I have been very impressed with this unit, and I would like to get it going again rather than buy a new one. Can anyone help me? Thanks.

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If you can isolate the inputs to the bass amp would give u a hint. I suggest try to check all components (out of circuit if possible) of the power supply.

Posted on Sep 08, 2008

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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

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