Question about AOpen AX4SG-UN Motherboard

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Cpu overheating CPU temp is running around 31 deg C with case open and external fan blowing on it. With case closed it started climbing up to 37 before I reopened the case. Do I need to replace only the cpu and fan, or should I replace whole motherboard? I've been trying to find a board to buy but no one seems to have one. Have they stopped making them or what? Can I use another board instead? Karen

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  • karriola Sep 05, 2008

    I will buy a new fan and give that a try first.

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I would purchase a external fan to keep the unit cool. if your computer is functioning and the only issue is that it's over heating, you could hardwire another fan unit. this way the fan is always running and that should keep the temp down. if your having a hard time finding a board chances are they are obselete and your out of luck, however you can check around your local repair shops and you just might get lucky... please rate this

Posted on Sep 05, 2008

  • Ronald Mueller
    Ronald Mueller Sep 05, 2008

    if you can try and hard wire a fan unit inside the case as well this will only help the situation.

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Hi,

Three possibilities:

  • the HSF (heatsink/fan combo) is no longer sufficiently cooling the CPU, probably dusty, clogged, the fan lubrication dried up. Remove, clean lubricate;
  • thermal runaway of the CPU (unlikely but still is a possibility);
  • temp sensor faulty. Could possibly resolve with a BIOS update/flash.
Hope this be of initial help/idea. Pls post back how things turned up or should you need additional information.

Good luck and kind regards. Thank you for using FixYa.

Posted on Sep 05, 2008

  • Louie  Role
    Louie Role Sep 05, 2008

    Should you still be interested with a replacement motherboard, pls try here (it's a store in the Philippines).

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First of all make sure that your motherboard is not overclocked. you can try to use a stronger fan and if the temperature still goes up then it only means that there is something wrong with your processor and you need to replace it.

Posted on Sep 05, 2008

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You can just simply btry to add another fan or get a bigger fan to make the system much cooler to avoid overheating, I think they already stop making this MOBO that's why its hard to find this any store even online...

Hope that helps.........

Posted on Sep 05, 2008

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You can try to use another fan with high cooling capability. Also you can adjust the CPU temp on the BIOS setup.

Posted on Sep 05, 2008

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1 Answer

My cpu overheated and now my video,keyboard,mouse,and usbs wont work! Whats wrong with it. Do i need a new fan?


Why did it overheat? In cases where a CPU has overheated, it more likely you will need a new CPU. If you can get one. Does the fan run? Is there dust in or around the heatsink? Have you booted the PC? If so, does it start to boot? Does the operating system load up? Anything displayed on the screen? Any errors on bootup? Rgds, Dave.

Mar 04, 2014 | Intel DQ965GF Motherboard

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My CPU Heat


You should check Task MGR and see what process's are running, you need to find out if the CPU is being pushed, when you are not doing anything the CPU should be close to zero or between 0-10 percent.

So if you check and find the CPU is running at Idle, then you check the CPU fan clean it.

You should install software that will show you the CPU temp and fan speed, as you work the CPU through software running, the fan should increase in speed.

If the CPU is not staying cool near 40C, then look for a better cooler.

Thermal compound has no miracle, the cooler is what is important, and the case fan is not as important as the CPU cooler itself.

Dec 02, 2012 | Motherboards

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I turn on the computer and it may run some times for about 10 or 15 min. and then shut down i was wondering if i need a bio's update or what i have two hard drives in the computer xp pro on 1 and vista...


It could be overheating. After it shuts down, restart it, and enter BIOS SETUP, and look for a "PC Health" or "Status" entry on the menu. If you're lucky, it will report the current CPU temperature, and the speed of the fans, and the settable temperature at which it will shut itself down.

Check the capacitors on the motherboard -- any capacitor with a "dome" on top, instead of perfectly-flat, is a leaking capacitor that is intermittently failing.

Jul 19, 2011 | Mach Speed (MSNV-939) Motherboard

1 Answer

Following about an hour (hopefully) of run time, this computer shuts down (appears to be overheating)


Heat is cause for "random" shut downs.

While the computer is running - inspect the visible fans. Make sure they're running smoothly - a screeching fan is not spinning at the correct speed - and like those not spinning at all; isn't doing the job intended. Replace any fan that makes noise or does not spin freely or at all.

Shut off the PC and take note of plugs & jacks; and disconnect all cables.

Remove the computer to a table with ample room to work. Position the computer so that left removable side panel is facing up. Loosen (or remove if required) any screws, clips or other fastener used to secure the panel to the case. Remove the cover and set aside.

Using a crevice tool or narrow wand attachment on a vacuum cleaner, gently vacuum the inside of the computer case. Try not to touch any components inside. Gently move cables and wires out of the way to allow the vacuum to **** dirt, dust, etc. from the motherboard and interior of the case. Some plugs at the end of wires can very easily be pulled off of connectors to the motherboard, so be very careful moving the cables and wires out of the way.

Be sure to pay attention to any slots in the case or drives - such as a floppy disk. Vacuum dust from the the opposite direction they entered - pull it back out instead of pulling it all the way through. Check openings in the case designed for airflow. Clear any obstructions found. Inspect the power supply. Often, a fan blows outside air into the power supply - coating the insides with dust. The dust is often visible choking the slots of the power supply inside the case - this should be vacuumed away from the slots, to restore airflow.

Inspect the CPU fan. Remove any dust and dirt caught on the fan blades. Spin the fan by hand. It should spin freely. Shine a light through the fan to view the heat sink. the heat sink is just a large metal piece that sits between the fan and the CPU itself. It conducts the heat created by the CPU away from the CPU - where the fan blows comparably cooler across it, wicking the heat away. If the heat sink fins, posts, or channels are clogged or coated, the CPU fan should be removed and the heat sink vacuumed or bushed clean in place. The CPU fan usually held in place with 2 or 4 small screws. Remove them and the gently rock the fan from the heat sink. Move it just off to the side so that it won't need to be unplugged from the motherboard. Clean the heat sink and reassemble.

After removing as much dust as possible, reassemble the case and reconnect. The overheating problem should be resolved. If you're still having issues, you start over again but this time try blowing the dust out. A caveat of that is that it forces dust and dirt deeper still into components inside the case. If the computer is not working - this may not be a cause for concern. It would be best to use a "shop air" source - like those compressors found in workshops or gas stations as they have large the large volume of air at significantly high pressure. Canned air bought in stores can't come close on either of those two qualities - but is better than nothing.

Reassemble and try again. If it is a heat related problem that hasn't existed long enough to cause permanent damage, your PC should work fine once again. Please rate this reply "very helpful" and good luck!

Nov 27, 2010 | Motherboards

1 Answer

My CPU temp varies between 48C & 52C which hangs my computer with


Have you checked the CPU fan? If not, open the case and inspect the fan and the cooling fins. Clean as needed to insure good air flow. You may need to remove the fan from the cooling fins. Also check the vents in the case to make sure they are not plugged with lint. Vacuuming the case openings would also be a good idea. When everything is back in place, turn on the computer and watch the fan to make sure that it is turning freely. close the case and let the computer run for a few minutes and the recheck the temperature.

Good luck, and please let me know how it works out for you!

~ Spoem


Mar 25, 2009 | ASUS Motherboards

1 Answer

Random shut down


Yes.... over heating can and will cause a system shutdown..

Download and install speedfan ( http://www.almico.com/sfdownload.php ) It will most likely tell you how hot things are really getting......

Depending on what cpu you have, you may have a thermal paste problem, you may need to remove the heatsink and re-apply heatsink thermal paste to the bottom of the heatsink and reseat ontop of the cpu. This will void any warranty if you PC still has any left.

Jan 07, 2009 | EliteGroup GeForce 6100SM-M Motherboard

1 Answer

System temperature too high


Do you still have your manual? If not download it from Gigabyte at this link:http://www.giga-byte.com/Products/Motherboard/Products_Spec.aspx?ProductID=2637
Enter your bios & open manual to page 51, "PC Health Status". Here you can monitor the CPU temp, system temp & CPU fan speed. Notice the manual shows the example of system temp to be 30degs C & current CPU Temperature is at 47degs C. One would think these temps are reasonable. My CPU fan runs between 3308Rpm & 3341Rpm. CPU @ 41deg C & MB @ 31deg C. AMD 64 X2 Dual Core 4200+ 2.21 GHz.
Suggest you try this. If your running Win XP. Open system properties. Click the Advanced tab. Click the settings button under
Startup and Recovery. Remove the check mark to the left of, Automatically restart. Windows should provide an error message if & when the system freezes. This will help in finding what is causing the system to freeze. If your CPU fan is running under 3000Rpm you might consider buying a faster fan or add a case fan to the side of the case to help bring in fresh air to blow onto the CPU fan & PCI-Express card. Here is a decent lace to look for case fans: http://www.xoxide.com/casefans.html

Keep me up to date andr_zero.
Good luck!
Mike

Dec 17, 2008 | Gigabyte GA-P35-DQ6 Motherboard

1 Answer

CPU throttles for No Reason!


Turbo-Cool makes a better power supply then all the rest . For total happiness even if you use two PCI-16 video cards ( CrossFire Ready, SLI Ready ) Turbo Cool 860-Watt Power Supply .

Jul 30, 2008 | Foxconn 661MX Motherboard

1 Answer

Motherboard problem


Chances are the CPU fan may be running too slow, dust & dirt build up under & over the fan blades can be a big factor. CPU fan could just be going. Are you over clocking the system. (IF so buy a better heatsink & fan for over clocking the system).
To check if CPU is getting too hot. Enter the bios & go to the title, "Power" page 2-28. Open Hardware monitor & check the CPU temp & mother board temp. (Make sure the case is closed in normal running conditions).
Link to Asus: http://support.asus.com/download/download.aspx?modelname=M2N-MX&SLanguage=en-us

Jul 02, 2008 | ASUS M2N-MX Motherboard

1 Answer

Troubleshooting


What is the brand name of the ram you are using? If you look up on AMD's website, it will tell you what RAM is compatable with your processor and mobo. 45 degrees celcius translates to 113 farenheit. If it is a constant temp that way, it is ok. But just at IDLE speed, means the processor is getting over heated more than likely after opening multiple apps.

Mar 17, 2008 | Gigabyte GA-MA790FX-DQ6 AMD Phenom Socket...

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