Question about Konica Minolta DiMAGE A200 Digital Camera

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With the close-up lens attached, can the flash photography be done?

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Re: With the close-up lens attached, can the flash...

Use of built-in flash will result in shadowing. Please use an external flash.

Posted on Sep 15, 2005

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What should i buy ? Lense or Flash for DSLR?


I would say it depends on the type of photography you intend to do.

Obviously, you're going to need at least one lens, whereas you can take photos without a flash at all. If you're doing landscape photography during the day, you won't have much need for a flash. If you're doing studio photography, you're going to need a flash or other source of light.

Feb 27, 2014 | Canon Digital Cameras

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I HAVE A NIKON 60 AND NEED TO KNOW WHAT TYPE OF LENS TO GET


In order to get close to the subject, you need to be able to focus close. If you're using one of the kit lenses, you won't be able to get much closer than a foot or two.

In order of decreasing cost:
  • Special macro lenses are designed to focus closer, as close as a couple of inches, but they cost more.
  • Extension tubes fit between the camera and other lenses, allowing the lens to focus closer.
  • Close-up adapters fit in front of the lens, also allowing closer focus.
One major consideration with any type of close-up photography is lighting. Having the camera close to the subject tends to block out light. Two possible ways around this are: a tripod or other support, and an additional light source such as an external flash unit.

Jul 22, 2010 | Nikon D60 Digital Camera

1 Answer

Best settings for close up


That depends. A true macro lens allows you to get a 1:1 reproduction ratio; most manufacturers call a lens "macro" if it allows 1:4 or so. Some lenses work better for close work if you reverse them, using a reverse adaptor to put the nose of the lens onto the mount. Bellows and extension rings behind the lens will give you sharper results than close-up adaptors that screw onto the front of the lens.

The focal length will affect perspective; to get the same image size with a wide angle lens, you'll have to get closer, wihch will make the background seem smaller and farther away. You don't have to get as close with a longer lens, which will make the background seem larger and closer.

The aperture affects depth-of-field. If you're photographing something flat, like a piece of paper, you don't need much DoF. If you're photographing something three-dimensional, you'll need more DoF.

The exposure mode might depend on the lighting conditions and your personal preferences. I tend to do most of my close-up work in Manual. I also tend to focus manually, for better control.

There's no one set of "best" settings for close-up photography, any more than there's a set of "best" settings for any other type of photography.

Mar 30, 2010 | Nikon D80 Digital Camera with 18-135mm...

1 Answer

Are there any digital photography how-to books for canon s1 is?


The minimum focus distance for this camera is 3.9 inches at W, 3.1 feet at T.

In order to blur the background you need to reduce the depth of field. Unfortunately, that's easier said than done. The S1 has a small sensor, and thus a short lens, only 5.8-58mm. If you've heard about "35mm equivalents," forget about that for now--the depth of field is determined by the physical focal length, not any equivalences. A lens this short is going to have a rather wide depth of field, no matter what you do. Even wide open, the maximum aperture is f/2.8 at W, f/3.1 at T.

Spend a couple of hours browsing in the photography section of your local public library. I'm sure you'll find some books on close-up photography. And if you want to learn the technical stuff about depth of field, apertures, and so on, you'll probably find books on that as well.

Apr 07, 2009 | Canon PowerShot S1 IS Digital Camera

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How do I attach lens cap string?!!!


go here and download the manual in your language

http://uk.leica-camera.com/photography/compact_cameras/d-lux_4/download-147_2.html

it's on page 9-10

Robert

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Jan 23, 2009 | Digital Cameras

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Whats the best economical lens to use for indoor photograph with


If you are new to photography in general and especially SLR photography I would suggest holding off on buying any lenses besides the 18-55mm.

The reason I suggest not buying extra lenses just yet is coz you need to get to know your camera and if you are new to SLR photography then you need to get your fundamentals right. Sure the 400D will let you shoot in full auto mode but you will really not learn much doing that and certainly not be making the most of your camera in that process and that will extend to your new lenses too.

Get used the the control, the 18-55 is a great little cheap lens with the pop up flash it will work great for most family pics. The 55-200mm is a new "cheap" lens, its been marketed as letting you go beyond 55mm thats why it starts at 55mm goes to 200mm.

Hope this helps you...

Jan 02, 2009 | Canon EOS 400D / Rebel XTi Digital Camera

1 Answer

Photography techniques


Use a zoom lens with a wide aperture, best done outdoors with trees behind the subject, it'll blur the background leaving the subject in sharp focus. very flattering especially if you have the subject with their face pointing away from the sun, this'll give you natural looking highlights around the hair line and shoulders and allow you to fill the shadows with a flash.

Nov 29, 2008 | Panasonic Lumix DMC-FZ7 Digital Camera

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Good book for a beginner?


have you set it to macro mode? (little flower icon on the right cursor) this function will allow you to get within about 2cm of the subject, however do not use the zoom as the lens cannot focus close enough. To get results any closer you will be looking at an slr and a budget on a few thousand! If enabling macro and not using zoom to allow the lens to focus doesn't get you close enough in you can always enlarge and crop images. have a look on www.picture-skew.blogspot.com i've taken some macros of flowers and bugs, this camera can capture the hairs on an ants back or the individual lenses of a flys compound lens eye.

persevere with this camera, for a very small budget you will get amazing results, ISO refers to the speed of 'film', it comes from the dark old ages of 35mm film cameras. Basically a low ISO is the lowest sensitivity to light and gives the best image quality, however as the ccd is less responsive to the light the camera holds the shutter open for longer. The higher the ISO the more sensitive the ccd but the greater the noise and lower the quality of picture.

Books, try looking for more photography orientated books and less digital camera based books. An upto date photography book will tell you all the technical information about how to take a good picture for any given senario.

if you would like any further advice email me (address on the blogspot)

Dec 20, 2007 | Sony Cyber-shot DSC-W50 Digital Camera

1 Answer

Blurry Images


If there's not enough light your camera can't invent any. Well, normally it can, which is what a flash does, but as you've said, no flash allowed. Your photos are blury because you're not mounting the camera on a tripod or you are using an ISO value that's too low for the available light. The shutter speed is slow to make up for the lack of light you have. But it's obviously too slow to hand-hold and you're shaking too much when you're taking the photo. Increasing the shutter speed is only going to make your images underexposed. So, pick a higher ISO value or get a tripod or monopod. Oh and read the manual. As for you purchasing the wide angle lens and the telephoto lens, I can not fathom why you would purchase something and have no idea what it is used for. That just boggles my mind. Perhaps a basic photography book is in order? Something to get a few of the fundamentals down? Any photography book with the word "beginner" and probably the word "digital" in it would be a fine start. They're all equally basic.

Sep 13, 2005 | Olympus Camedia C-700 Ultra Zoom Digital...

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