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Can not play audio files (0XC00D11BA)

I am currently running Windows XP Professional and Windows Media Player 9 and the latest version of DirectX. There are no updates required by any of the three programs. The problem occured when I upgraded my computer. The only Changes are as follows: P3 700 MHz changed to AMD Athlon XP 2600+ Memory 512 MB PC-133 to 512MB PC-2100 The new main board is a Chaintech SKT600 VIA Chipset KT600/VT8237 C-Media AC'97 audio chip Direct X diagnostics can find nothing wrong with sound. All New Drives are installed and working correctly. All Drivers from old board that are no longer needed have been uninstalled. There are no audio or other applications that are running, in point of fact there are only two programs that are in my startup menu. Because everything else works including other audio players and directX shows now errors where do I go from here? I can not play audio files

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Try downloading the windows media player 11
(that fixed a lot of my sound problems)
hope this helps

Posted on Sep 04, 2008

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Windows media player won't work


Which operating system ? Which version of Media player ?
Though designed with Windows 7 in mind, Windows Media Player 11 (WMP 11) is fully compatible with Windows XP.

The trick is knowing which version of WMP 11 to download.
Different versions of the software exist not only for Windows 7, Vista, and XP, but also for both 32-bit and 64-bit Windows XP.

Additionally, WMP 11 is only compatible with XP if it is using Service Pack 2 or Service Pack 3. Before downloading the appropriate installation file, you will need to verify which version your system requires.

Open the "Start" menu.
Open "My Computer."

Click "Help", then select "About Windows."
This will display a window with system information.

Find the listing that specifies your Service Pack. If you are operating without Service Pack 2 or 3, you will need to install one (see Resources).


Open the "Start" menu and click "Run." Within the text field, type "winmsd.exe."

Click "OK." Select "System Summary."
Find the heading labeled "Item."

Under this heading should be the word "Processor."
The value associated with "Processor" will determine which version of Windows XP you are running.

If the value begins with "x86," you are running a 32-bit version.
If it begins with "ia64" or "AMD64," then you are running a 64-bit version.

Download the Windows Media Player installation file that matches your version of Windows (see Below).
http://windows.microsoft.com/en-US/windows/downloads/windows-media-player

Open the file once it has finished downloading.
This will launch the installation wizard.

Follow the onscreen instructions to install WMP 11.
The program should now run normally.
How to Fix Windows Media Center

Windows Media Center is the home entertainment hub on a Windows computer.
With Media Center, you can play live television, songs, DVDs and slideshows.

It is preinstalled on Windows XP Media Center Edition, Windows Vista Home Premium/Ultimate Edition and Windows 7 Home Premium, Professional, Enterprise and Ultimate editions.

From time to time, users run into issues trying to play audio or video files, or with an extender connected to Media Center.

Extenders are devices that allow you to "extend" the Media Center onto a TV screen or larger display.

The Xbox 360 gaming console is an example of an extender.
Launch Windows Media Center from your computer's Start menu.

Scroll down to "Music" on the Media Center home screen.
Select "Music library."

If you find an empty folder under "Music Library," navigate to the folder on your hard drive that stores your music file and add it to Media Center's library.

If the problem isn't an empty folder, look at the file extension on the music file that won't play. Media Center can't play files with unknown or incompatible extensions.

If you find a questionable extension, skip that file. Click once on another file with a different extension, one you know is compatible with Media Center, and then click "Open" to test if you can play that one.

Media Center will play MP3, CDA, WAV and other music file formats.
Open Windows Media Player from the Start menu if you receive a codec error while trying to play either audio or video files.

If you open the file in Media Player, the codec will download automatically.
You should then be able to play the file in Media Center.

Troubleshoot your firewall settings if a Media Center extender doesn't work.
You'll have a problem using an extender if Windows Firewall blocks it.

Go to "Control Panel" from the Start menu and double-click on "Windows Firewall."
Click on "Allow a program or feature through Windows Firewall."

Click to check "Media Center Extenders."
Click on "Apply."

Check external speaker cables to make sure they're connected if you can't hear any sound. Check the computer's volume settings by clicking on the "VOL+" icon at the bottom right corner of the main Media Center screen to make sure the volume is not turned off or down too low.

You may need to reconfigure your speakers if you're having volume or sound issues.
Scroll down to "Tasks" in the Media Center home screen and select "Settings."

Click on "General" and select "Windows Media Center Setup."
Click on "Set Up Your Speakers."

Follow the on-screen prompts to reconfigure your speakers.

Dec 01, 2013 | Gateway ONE GZ7108 All-in-One Desktop PC

Tip

D3dx9_37 is missing?


This is due to the fact that your Direct X 9 version is either out of date or just plain missing.
The d3dx9_37.dll file is one of many similar files contained in the DirectX software collection. Because DirectX is used by most Windows based games and advanced graphics programs these errors usually show up when using these programs.

To fix this it is as simple of downloading the latest version of DX9.
Click here to go to FileHippo and get the June 2010 version. Click on the green arrow to the right to start the download.

I've had many people ask me "how is this possible when I've just installed Windows Vista or even Windows 7." The simple answer is that when you install Windows Vista for example it ONLY installes Direct X10 components and when you install Windows 7 it ONLY installs DirectX 10 or 11. Therefore you will need to seperately download and install DirectX 9 in order to play games in DirectX 9 solve this problem.

If installing the latest version of DirectX 9 doesn't solve the problem then do the following:
  • Explore the game CD you are trying to use and find the DirectX 9 version the game or program came with. Install this version.
  • Uninstall the game or software and then re-install it. One of the files associated with d3dx9_37 may have been overwritten or deleted by accident.
  • You could try extracting the d3dx9_37 from the DirectX 9 package and placing it where it needs to be.
  • Re-install or update your graphics card drivers.

on Nov 14, 2010 | PC Desktops

Tip

Directx Explained



Ever wondered just what that enigmatic name means?

Gaming and multimedia applications are some of the most satisfying programs you can get for your PC, but getting them to run properly isn't always as easy as it could be. First, the PC architecture was never designed as a gaming platform. Second, the wide - ranging nature of the PC means that one person's machine can be different from another. While games consoles all contain the same hardware, PCs don't: the massive range of difference can make gaming a headache.

Ta alleviate as much of the pain as possible, Microsoft needed to introduce a common standard which all games and multimedia applications could follow - a common interface is DirectX, something which can be the source of much confusion.

DirectX is an interface designed to make a certain programming tasks much easier, for both the game developer and the rest of us who just want to sit down and play the latest blockbuster. Before we can explain what DirectX is and how it works though, we need a little history lesson.

DirectX history
Any game needs to perform certain task again and again. It needs to watch for your input from mouse, joystick or keyboard, and it needs to be able to display screen images and play sounds or music. That's pretty much any game at the most simplistic level.

Imagine how incredibly complex this was for programmers developing on the early pre - Windows PC architecture, then. Each programmer needed to develop their own way of reading the keyboard or detecting whether a joystick was even attached, let alone being used to play the game. Specific routines were needed even to display the simplest of images on the screen or play a simple sound.

Essentially, the game programmers were talking directly to your PC's hardware at a fundamental level. When Microsoft introduced Windows, it was imperative for the stability and success of the PC platform that things were made easier for both the developer and the player. After all, who would bother writing games for a machine when they had to reinvent the wheel every time they began work on a new game? Microsoft's idea was simple: stop programmers talking directly to the hardware, and build a common toolkit which they use instead. DirectX was born.

How it is works
At the most basic level, DirectX is an interface between the hardware in your PC and Windows itself, part of the Windows API or Application Programming Interface. Let's look at a practical example. When a game developer wants to play a sound file, it's simply a case of using the correct library function. When a game runs, this calls the DirectX API, which in turn plays the sound file. The developer doesn't need to know what type of sound card he's dealing with, what it's capable of, or how to talk to it. Microsoft has provided DirectX, and the sound card manufacturer has provided a DirectX - capable driver. He ask for the sound to be played, and it is - whichever machine it runs on.

From our point of views as gamers, DirectX also makes things incredibly easy - at least in theory. You install a new sound card in place of your old one, and it comes with a DirectX driver. Next time you play your favorite game you can still hear sounds and music, and you haven't had to make any complex configuration changes.

Originally, DirectX began life as a simple toolkit: early hardware was limited and only the most basic graphical functions were required. As hardware and software has evolved in complexity, so has DirectX. It’s now much more than a graphical toolkit, and the term has come to encompass a massive selection of routines which deal with all sorts of hardware communication. For example, the DirectInput routines can deal with all sorts of input devices, from simple two-button mice to complex flight joysticks. Other parts include DirectSound for audio devices and DirectPlay provides a toolkit for online or multiplayer gaming.

DirectX versions
The current version of DirectX at time of writing is DirectX 9.0. This runs on all versions of Windows from Windows 98 up to and including Windows Server 2003 along with every revision in between. It doesn’t run on Windows 95 though: if you have a machine with Windows 95 installed, you’re stuck with the older and less capable 8.0a. Windows NT 4 also requires a specific version – in this case, it’s DirectX 3.0a.

With so many versions of DirectX available over the years, it becomes difficult to keep track of which version you need. In all but the most rare cases, all versions of DirectX are backwardly compatible – games which say they require DirectX 7 will happily run with more recent versions, but not with older copies. Many current titles explicitly state that they require DirectX 9, and won’t run without the latest version installed. This is because they make use of new features introduced with this version, although it has been known for lazy developers to specify the very latest version as a requirement when the game in question doesn’t use any of the new enhancements. Generally speaking though, if a title is version locked like this, you will need to upgrade before you can play. Improvements to the core DirectX code mean you may even see improvements in many titles when you upgrade to the latest build of DirectX. Downloading and installing DirectX need not be complex, either.

Upgrading DirectX
All available versions of Windows come with DirectX in one form or another as a core system component which cannot be removed, so you should always have at least a basic implementation of the system installed on your PC. However, many new games require the very latest version before they work properly, or even at all.

Generally, the best place to install the latest version of DirectX from is the dedicated section of the Microsoft Web site, which is found at www.microsoft.com/windows/directx. As we went to press, the most recent build available for general download was DirectX 9.0b. You can download either a simple installer which will in turn download the components your system requires as it installs, or download the complete distribution package in one go for later offline installation.

Another good source for DirectX is games themselves. If a game requires a specific version, it’ll be on the installation CD and may even be installed automatically by the game’s installer itself. You won’t find it on magazine cover discs though, thanks to Microsoft’s licensing terms.

Diagnosing problems

Diagnosing problems with a DirectX installation can be problematic, especially if you don’t know which one of the many components is causing your newly purchased game to fall over. Thankfully, Microsoft provides a useful utility called the DirectX Diagnostic Tool, although this isn’t made obvious. You won’t find this tool in the Start Menu with any version of Windows, and each tends to install it in a different place.

The easiest way to use it is to open the Start Menu’s Run dialog, type in dxdiag and then click OK. When the application first loads, it takes a few seconds to interrogate your DirectX installation and find any problems. First, the DirectX Files tab displays version information on each one of the files your installation uses. The Notes section at the bottom is worth checking, as missing or corrupted files will be flagged here.

The tabs marked Display, Sound, Music, Input and Network all relate to specific areas of DirectX, and all but the Input tab provide tools to test the correct functioning on your hardware. Finally, the More Help tab provides a useful way to start the DirectX Troubleshooter, Microsoft’s simple linear problem solving tool for many common DirectX issues.

on Feb 06, 2010 | PC Desktops

1 Answer

DVD drive not recognizing audio-visual Cds except audios only


My gut says that the software used to view the vidoes needs to be updated to a version that supports the latest video codecs. My guess is that you are trying to view .mp4 files but the player can only play the audio portion.

If you are using Windows Media Player, then either get the newest version or try an alternate video player like VideoLan VLC or Media Player Classic - Home Cinema which support more file formats.

Jul 30, 2011 | HP DX2000 PC Desktop

1 Answer

0xC00D11BA


Is this a sound problem with Windows Media Player 9? If so, I found a thread online which should be of some help. The solution from that site is as follows:
"One thing comes to mind. Open WMP, go to Tools, Options, Devices and wait till the window populates. Then highlight Speakers and click the Properties button.
Where it says, "Audio Device to Use", try changing to "Default Direct Sound Device". If that is already chosen, choose your soundcard from the dropdown list."

For the full thread, go here: http://www.windowsbbs.com/windows-xp/16782-windows-media-player-9-0xc00d11ba-cannot-play-file.html
Credit goes to Abraxas.
Thank you for using FixYa!

May 08, 2011 | PC Desktops

1 Answer

Cannot Play .wmv file with WMA 9.2 and WMV 9 professional codecs


Have had same happen. Try clicking right and choosing open with....and choose windows Media player for list. Don't know why this is the part that works for me. double clicking the file has never worked for me. I get the wmp with the same error but when I select the wmp and let IT open the file....it works....I think it is magic and a stubborn way to do this but it works

May 07, 2009 | PC Desktops

1 Answer

Sis651 no sounds idont know why? ------------------ System Information ------------------ Time of this report: 10/19/2008, 18:55:51 Machine name: DEWIDEWI-557D8E Operating System: Windows XP Professional...


Hello,

Is the sound card built in to *********** board? if no, you have to know your Audio model number and brand..and then download the drivers from the manufacturer's websites..some drivers are here like VGA drivers: http://www.opendrivers.com/driver/236077/sis-sis650-sis651-series-driver-univga3-3.74-windows-98se-me-2000-xp-xp-x64-free-download.html

Hope you will report the model of your audio card.

melnavz

Oct 20, 2008 | PC Desktops

1 Answer

Waching uploading movies online on wmv format


WMV files are actually Windows Media format, specifically for streaming on the web. Have you tried installing the latest version of Windows Media Player (version 10)? You can download it from Microsoft's website.

You can also try reinstalling the Windows Media Player 9 CODECS:

http://download.microsoft.com/download/a/0/3/a0398036-25b9-410c-b371-c59957c1b0f4/WM9Codecs.exe

Jul 25, 2008 | PC Desktops

1 Answer

Games


You can got to start>run> type in the box "dxdiag". This runs the directx diagnostic tool. Towards the bottom of this window it will display a version number the latest being 9.0C. If your version is not current you can update directx thru windows updates or you can download it from http://www.softwarepatch.com/windows/directx.html

If your version is current I would suggest updating your graphics card driver.

hope this helps
http://pchelpforanyone.blogspot.com

Mar 07, 2008 | PC Desktops

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