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Will not charge

I had a short in the wiring harness and it quit charging i fixed the short put on a new voltage regulator it fixed the problem for about 2 hours now its not charging again

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Double check the regulator with an ohm meter, if it's not working, then you may have missed a short, bad ground, or bare wire. Hopefully, it didn't blow the new regulator.

Posted on Sep 04, 2008

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Kawasaki Vulcan 500-26,000, miles.new rotor and stator. Batty It is not quite chargeing enough.it has to be changed every wk to 10 days itis1991kawa.Vulcan 500


The battery charge voltage should be about 13.5-15.5 volts dc when speed is about 2000-2500 rpm. The rectifier and/or voltage regulator could be bad or the motorcycle could have a wiring issue such as an intermittent connection/short etc.

Nov 21, 2014 | Motorcycles

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How to test voltage regaltor


Voltage Regulator Bleed Test if the battery is discharging wile sitting unused.

Ensure that the regulator is connected to battery, then unplug voltage regulator connector at the engine crankcase (the stator connector) to isolate the regulator from the stator windings. THEN using a test light, touch one probe to a suitable ground and touch the other to the regulator pins, one at a time. IF the tester light glows at any time the regulator is defective (shorted) and needs to be replaced.

OTHERWISE:

Motorcycle voltage regulator connections must be clean and tight for proper operation so it must be verified that both the AC (stator) connections and the DC (battery supply side) connectors are clean, fully inserted and locked in place with the regulator latches (they should also be coated with dielectric grease to keep them clean and corrosion free).

The motorcycle voltage regulator is a series regulator that is also a rectifier that changes stator supplied alternating current (AC) to direct current (DC) which the battery system requires. If the charging system does not keep the battery properly charged both with regards to Voltage (between 13 VDC minimum and 15.5 VDC maximum) and the current supply at a high enough amperage to meet the system lighting, ignition, TSM/TSSM, security and accessory requirements plus a minimum of 3.5 more amps (3.5 amps more than the foregoing system requirements) there are a number of tests that can be done to ascertain why.

As the voltage regulator must have a good, clean, tight (and otherwise secure) ground connection for proper operation a Voltage Regulator Ground Circuit Test can be accomplished by connecting an ohmmeter to a known good ground (like the battery negative post) and the case of the regulator. If there is continuity with little resistance the ground is GOOD and nothing more needs to be done BUT if there is NO continuity or there is more than minimal resistance the ground will need to be fixed so there is a low resistance continuity by either locating and fixing the poor ground or adding a new grounding wire from the regulator case to a know good ground.

A Voltage Regulator Power Circuit Test can be accomplished by turning OFF the Ignition, disconnecting the voltage regulator and with an ohmmeter set to the Rx1 setting, testing for continuity between the voltage regulator wire harness supply terminal and the main fuse terminal (with the fuse removed) and if there is continuity present then the wiring circuit here is GOOD but if there is NO continuity then you will need to either find the open and repair it or replace the whole wire running from the voltage regulator to the main fuse.

As there should be no short circuit in the power supply from the regulator to battery (main fuse) wiring OR in the regulator internal circuitry continuity from these both need to be checked again with an ohmmeter set to the Rx1 setting. If the regulator to main fuse wiring connector is not disconnected from the regulator you can connect an ohmmeter with one lead on the regulator supply wire terminal end at the main fuse (with the main fuse removed) and the other lead to a known good ground. If there is NO continuity then you know that both the supply wire and the regulator are okay (as there is no short to ground). BUT if there is continuity then either the regulator or wiring or both is/are shorted to ground. To determine where there is a short circuit (i.e. either the wiring or the regulator internal circuitry) you must disconnect the DC side of the wiring harness (the connector at the DC side of the regulator) from the regulator and test between either or both ends of the wire i.e. from the regulator wire harness connector terminal and a known good ground and/or the main fuse terminal end of the wire and a known good ground. If there is any continuity the wire is shorted to ground and the short circuit must be found and repaired or the wire must be completely replaced. If there is no such continuity then the regulator DC supply terminal (with the DC side of the regulator connector disconnected) must be tested by putting one lead of an ohmmeter on the regulator terminal and the other on a known good ground. If there is continuity the regulator is shorted to ground and must be replaced. If there is a short in the wiring it is unlikely BUT the regulator could ALSO be internally shorted so it should also be checked either before or after any wiring short is located and repaired.

The voltage regulator must also properly regulate the rectified DC voltage supplied to the battery so that it is not less than 13 VDC or more than 15.5 VDC. If the regulator is not properly limiting supply voltage to the battery to 15.5 VDC or less it will be overcharging the battery. This can be tested for by operating the motorcycle engine at 3000 rpm while placing a voltmeter between the battery positive and negative posts and reading the supplied voltage. If the reading is greater than 15.5 VDC the regulator is defective and must be replaced. If the voltage is less than 15.5 VDC but more than 13 VDC the regulator and the rest of the charging system are operating correctly. If the supplied voltage is less than 13 VDC the AC side of the system must be tested and if the AC side is good but the supplied voltage at the battery is less than 13 VDC then the regulator is defective and must be replaced. If the AC side of the system is not providing correct AC supply then the stator must be tested and if it is bad, replaced and if it is good then the rotor inspected (cannot be electrically tested as it consists of permanent magnets but it could be inspected fro physical damage and roughly tested for strong magnetic force fields by using a ferrous metal object to see if the attraction of the magnets is strong or weak, but this is basically a better guess rather than a precise measurement). The rotor can also be physically inspected for physical signs of damage including signs of the center hole having become oval AND the stator bolts inspected for possibly having come loose and into contact with the rotor.

Sep 09, 2014 | 2004 Harley Davidson FLHTC - FLHTCI...

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Looking for help charging system not charging battery on 1999 Harley Davidson fatboy


Check regulator ground by using an ohmmeter with one lead on a known good ground, such as the battery ground cable, and the other on the regulator base.
The connection where the alternator stator wires plug into the regulator could be corroded/dirty and need to be cleaned and sprayed with electrical contact cleaner and protected with dielectric grease because corroded wires going to the battery or alternator from the stator or the regulator will affect the ability of the charging system to properly charge a battery.

Motorcycle voltage regulator connections must be clean and tight for proper operation so it must be verified that both the AC (stator) connections and the DC (battery supply side) connectors are clean, fully inserted and locked in place with the regulator latches (they should also be coated with dielectric grease to keep them clean and corrosion free).

The motorcycle voltage regulator is a series regulator that is also a rectifier that changes stator supplied alternating current (AC) to direct current (DC) which the battery system requires. If the charging system does not keep the battery properly charged both with regards to Voltage (between 13 VDC minimum and 15.5 VDC maximum) and the current supply at a high enough amperage to meet the system lighting, ignition, TSM/TSSM, security and accessory requirements plus a minimum of 3.5 more amps (3.5 amps more than the foregoing system requirements) there are a number of tests that can be done to ascertain why.

As the voltage regulator must have a good, clean, tight (and otherwise secure) ground connection for proper operation a Voltage Regulator Ground Circuit Test can be accomplished by connecting an ohmmeter to a known good ground (like the battery negative post) and the case of the regulator. If there is continuity with little resistance the ground is GOOD and nothing more needs to be done BUT if there is NO continuity or there is more than minimal resistance the ground will need to be fixed so there is a low resistance continuity by either locating and fixing the poor ground or adding a new grounding wire from the regulator case to a know good ground.

A Voltage Regulator Power Circuit Test can be accomplished by turning OFF the Ignition, disconnecting the voltage regulator and with an ohmmeter set to the Rx1 setting, testing for continuity between the voltage regulator wire harness supply terminal and the main fuse terminal (with the fuse removed) and if there is continuity present then the wiring circuit here is GOOD but if there is NO continuity then you will need to either find the open and repair it or replace the whole wire running from the voltage regulator to the main fuse.

As there should be no short circuit in the power supply from the regulator to battery (main fuse) wiring OR in the regulator internal circuitry continuity from these both need to be checked again with an ohmmeter set to the Rx1 setting. If the regulator to main fuse wiring connector is not disconnected from the regulator you can connect an ohmmeter with one lead on the regulator supply wire terminal end at the main fuse (with the main fuse removed) and the other lead to a known good ground. If there is NO continuity then you know that both the supply wire and the regulator are okay (as there is no short to ground). BUT if there is continuity then either the regulator or wiring or both is/are shorted to ground. To determine where there is a short circuit (i.e. either the wiring or the regulator internal circuitry) you must disconnect the DC side of the wiring harness (the connector at the DC side of the regulator) from the regulator and test between either or both ends of the wire i.e. from the regulator wire harness.

AC Output Check
Disconnect the voltage regulator connector from the alternator stator wiring and then connect an AC voltmeter across both stator sockets of a two wire stator, or if a three wire stator across two of the three for example 1 & 3 and then later you will repeat the test between 2 & 3 and later between 1 & 2. THEN run the engine at as close as possible in the circumstances to 2000 RPM. The AC output should be approximately 32-40 VAC, approximately 16-20VAC per 1000 RPM. If you have done a stator static test and the stator has proven to be in good mechanical condition and the AC output is below specifications, the charging problem is going to be a faulty rotor. If you have not done a static stator check yet and the AC output is less than as set out above it may be that the stator is defective and the static stator check will need to be done. While the regulator has nothing whatsoever to do with the alternator output, if the alternator output is good the regulator might be defective in either rectification or in limiting the output to the battery to under 15 VDC. If AC output is low and the stator has passed the static stator check then it is likely that the permanent magnets in the alternator rotor are weak. A permanent magnet can lose its magnetic strength if it is dropped or shocked such as letting it snap into place when being installed or possibly by use of an impact wrench to remove the compensator fastener etc.

May 27, 2014 | Harley Davidson FLSTF - FLSTFI Fat Boy...

1 Answer

2004 Ultra classic won't charge battery


Motorcycle voltage regulator connections must be clean and tight for proper operation so it must be verified that both the AC (stator) connections and the DC (battery supply side) connectors are clean, fully inserted and locked in place with the regulator latches (they should also be coated with dielectric grease to keep them clean and corrosion free).

The motorcycle voltage regulator is a series regulator that is also a rectifier that changes stator supplied alternating current (AC) to direct current (DC) which the battery system requires. If the charging system does not keep the battery properly charged both with regards to Voltage (between 13 VDC minimum and 15.5 VDC maximum) and the current supply at a high enough amperage to meet the system lighting, ignition, TSM/TSSM, security and accessory requirements plus a minimum of 3.5 more amps (3.5 amps more than the foregoing system requirements) there are a number of tests that can be done to ascertain why.

As the voltage regulator must have a good, clean, tight (and otherwise secure) ground connection for proper operation a Voltage Regulator Ground Circuit Test can be accomplished by connecting an ohmmeter to a known good ground (like the battery negative post) and the case of the regulator. If there is continuity with little resistance the ground is GOOD and nothing more needs to be done BUT if there is NO continuity or there is more than minimal resistance the ground will need to be fixed so there is a low resistance continuity by either locating and fixing the poor ground or adding a new grounding wire from the regulator case to a know good ground.

A Voltage Regulator Power Circuit Test can be accomplished by turning OFF the Ignition, disconnecting the voltage regulator and with an ohmmeter set to the Rx1 setting, testing for continuity between the voltage regulator wire harness supply terminal and the main fuse terminal (with the fuse removed) and if there is continuity present then the wiring circuit here is GOOD but if there is NO continuity then you will need to either find the open and repair it or replace the whole wire running from the voltage regulator to the main fuse.

As there should be no short circuit in the power supply from the regulator to battery (main fuse) wiring OR in the regulator internal circuitry continuity from these both need to be checked again with an ohmmeter set to the Rx1 setting. If the regulator to main fuse wiring connector is not disconnected from the regulator you can connect an ohmmeter with one lead on the regulator supply wire terminal end at the main fuse (with the main fuse removed) and the other lead to a known good ground. If there is NO continuity then you know that both the supply wire and the regulator are okay (as there is no short to ground). BUT if there is continuity then either the regulator or wiring or both is/are shorted to ground. To determine where there is a short circuit (i.e. either the wiring or the regulator internal circuitry) you must disconnect the DC side of the wiring harness (the connector at the DC side of the regulator) from the regulator and test between either or both ends of the wire i.e. from the regulator wire harness connector terminal and a known good ground and/or the main fuse terminal end of the wire and a known good ground. If there is any continuity the wire is shorted to ground and the short circuit must be found and repaired or the wire must be completely replaced. If there is no such continuity then the regulator DC supply terminal (with the DC side of the regulator connector disconnected) must be tested by putting one lead of an ohmmeter on the regulator terminal and the other on a known good ground. If there is continuity the regulator is shorted to ground and must be replaced. If there is a short in the wiring it is unlikely BUT the regulator could ALSO be internally shorted so it should also be checked either before or after any wiring short is located and repaired.

The voltage regulator must also properly regulate the rectified DC voltage supplied to the battery so that it is not less than 13 VDC or more than 15.5 VDC. If the regulator is not properly limiting supply voltage to the battery to 15.5 VDC or less it will be overcharging the battery. This can be tested for by operating the motorcycle engine at 3000 rpm while placing a voltmeter between the battery positive and negative posts and reading the supplied voltage. If the reading is greater than 15.5 VDC the regulator is defective and must be replaced. If the voltage is less than 15.5 VDC but more than 13 VDC the regulator and the rest of the charging system are operating correctly. If the supplied voltage is less than 13 VDC the AC side of the system must be tested and if the AC side is good but the supplied voltage at the battery is less than 13 VDC then the regulator is defective and must be replaced. If the AC side of the system is not providing correct AC supply then the stator must be tested and if it is bad, replaced and if it is good then the rotor inspected (cannot be electrically tested as it consists of permanent magnets but it could be inspected fro physical damage and roughly tested for strong magnetic force fields by using a ferrous metal object to see if the attraction of the magnets is strong or weak, but this is basically a better guess rather than a precise measurement). The rotor can also be physically inspected for physical signs of damage including signs of the center hole having become oval AND the stator bolts inspected for possibly having come loose and into contact with the rotor.


AC Output Check
Disconnect the voltage regulator connector from the alternator stator wiring and then connect an AC voltmeter across both stator sockets of a two wire stator, or if a three wire stator across two of the three for example 1 & 3 and then later you will repeat the test between 2 & 3 and later between 1 & 2. THEN run the engine at as close as possible in the circumstances to 2000 RPM. The AC output should be approximately 32-40 VAC, approximately 16-20 VAC per 1000 RPM. If you have done a stator static test and the stator has proven to be in good mechanical condition and the AC output is below specifications, the charging problem is going to be a faulty rotor. If you have not done a static stator check yet and the AC output is less than as set out above it may be that the stator is defective and the static stator check will need to be done. While the regulator has nothing whatsoever to do with the alternator output, if the alternator output is good the regulator might be defective in either rectification or in limiting the output to the battery to under 15 VDC. If AC output is low and the stator has passed the static stator check then it is likely that the permanent magnets in the alternator rotor are weak. A permanent magnet can lose its magnetic strength if it is dropped or shocked such as letting it snap into place when being installed or possibly by use of an impact wrench to remove the compensator fastener etc.

Apr 28, 2014 | 2004 Harley Davidson FLHTCUI Electra Glide...

1 Answer

Charging system problem 1994 pant era


Sounds like you have a short in your wireing harness. Look by the brake caliper.,also make sure the voltage regulator is tight.

Mar 24, 2014 | Arctic Cat Winter Sports

1 Answer

2002 Ford Focus, driving down road, airbag light comes on, dashlights go out, engine runs rough then quits. Restarts, goes one block, quits again.


Symptoms of a charging system problem. The charging system comprises the alternator, battery and associated wiring. If the alternator should fail to produce a sufficient or stable enough voltage for the car's electronic systems - due to a wiring short, faulty voltage regulator, or corroded electrical connector, for example - the car will run off the "reserve" in the battery for a short time until the battery is eventually depleted. (The battery itself could also contribute to the problem if it has a faulty cell or for some reason is causing the alternator to put out an excessively high voltage in an attempt to compensate.)

So a couple of quick checks: Measure the battery voltage with the car off. Yours sounds like it will be dead; the clicking while attempting to start is the starter relay not getting enough juice. Then the question becomes: Is the battery dead because of age (fails to hold a charge) or because the alternator isn't charging it? To answer this question, measure the voltage at the battery with the car running. (Jump it or substitute a known good 12V battery.) You should see 14+V. If you only see 12V or less, you're seeing only the current battery charge without any contribution from the alt.

Finally, don't assume because the alt isn't putting out anything the alt is at fault. The wiring harness and electrical connector to the back of the alt should be thoroughly examined. (The wiring connector is a known failure point on early models.) The wiring harness should obviously show no signs of burning, melting or chafing and the battery terminals should be corrosion free and tight. If the harness checks out, remove the alt and have it bench tested. Rebuilding usually gives better long term reliability than chain store bought reman units, I'm told.

Long story short, I suspect the voltage regulator in your alternator failed, the battery gave it's all trying to keep your car running, finally gave up and now you have a dead alt and a dead battery. Don't just install a new battery without doing the alternator voltage output tests.

If you're really lucky it could be as simple as loose or corroded battery terminals.

Dec 31, 2012 | 2002 Ford Focus

2 Answers

1982 Yamaha XJ 550, the battery will not take a charge. New battery, checked all connections, ran all the tests (stator, brushes, and alternator). Replaced the voltage regulator/recifier. Not sure what is...


It is corrected properly, right? + to the wiring harness and - to ground ... right? Are you certain about the rectifier? Is the battery charged at this time?

You know a alternator cannot make power unless you first put power into it ... right? Alternators (unlike most generators) are not self exciting. If your battery is weak or "dead", the alternator cannot make electricity to charge the battery. I don't know what the rating of your alternator is. Your battery should be fully charged before you do any more tests. If you have a 1 amp charger, allow at least 10 hours for a full charge. Don't cook your battery with a big, powerful, fast charging automotive battery charger.

Good luck with your repair ... I hope you find this response helpful.

Thanks for your question @ FixYa.com

May 02, 2011 | Yamaha XJ 650 Motorcycles

1 Answer

1979 dodge d-150 truck .. The battery wont stay charged we have put new battery, wiring harness, voltage regulator, alternator and coil what else could be the problem


I can only guess here but clean your wires going into the bat terminals, also check for a light that may be stuck on when it is parkes such as trunk engine or glove compartment.. since you did all these things also check the alt/charge fuse

Dec 10, 2010 | Dodge Ram 150 Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

The bike does not charge the battery. After


Battery new or old (fluid levels), Charging System and Components, fuses, wiring harnesses, and look for loose or bare wires including lights and wires...good luck this will take some time but worth it in the pocket book.

Oct 13, 2009 | 1982 BMW R 100 RT

3 Answers

Bad regulator?


Fuse 2 is actually the fuse from the regulator to the battery (see schematic below) - so if it's blown then you are not charging the battery. Put the correct fuse in - if it blows again, you may have a shorted regulator. Unplug both connections to the regulator: With your test meter set to 'ohms' check in turn between each of the three yellow wires in the 3-pin connector to both the red & blacks in the 4 pin connector (the two reds are already connected to each other, as are the two blacks). Also check between the reds & the blacks. None of these should readings be 'short' (zero ohms). Inspect the wiring at the three-pin connector - if the bike's harness looks charred/burned that is a sign the regulator has shorted. There is possibility it could have taken the stator with it. Incidentally, the cable that plugs into the three pin connector - that should be a replacement auxiliarry harness: the original was deemed too small gauge for the job & was replaced with the auxiliary one as a recall. You should find that cable is stand-alone from the main bike harness and you can follow it back to the stator output connection. At both ends you should find the connectors of the original harness that is 'laced' into the complete harness. If you do not find that auxiliary harness, you need to get it. You should be able to get it at no charge from Triumph if the records on your VIN show it was never supplied.

Nov 10, 2008 | 2002 Triumph Centennial Edition Daytona

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