Question about Konica Minolta DiMAGE 7 Digital Camera

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With Macro flash unit attached, and using the closest subject distance, images are extremely over-exposed.

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The camera fails to control the flash output automatically due to the high intensity of Macro ring flash, causing the image to be over-exposed. Please set the camera as below to prevent a undesired result. Camera and Flash Settings - Set the sensitivity to ISO 100 using the function dial of the camera. - Set the flash metering of the camera to Pre-Flash TTL from the recording-mode menu. MACRO RING FLASH 1200 - Set the camera exposure mode to A or M mode. - Set the aperture to f/6.7. - Attach a ND filter x4 (0.6D) to the camera lens. MACRO TWIN FLASH 2400 - Attach a diffuser to the flash tube units. In case the flash tube and the subject is too close, eg. Not using the arms, set the camera exposure mode to A or M mode and the aperture to f/6.7. A subject at minimum distance may still be overexposed. Use exposure compensation to obtain the best result.

Posted on Sep 15, 2005

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1 Answer

Can't use macro and flash at same time


Correct. Most cameras will not let you use the flash in macro mode. There are several reasons for this. One is the distance. The flash is so close to the subject that the camera cannot properly adjust the amount of light. Perhaps more important, since the flash is off the optical axis of the lens, any illumination from the flash will be uneven. The part of the subject closest to the flash will get more light than the part farthest away.

May 26, 2014 | DXG Technology DXG-518 Digital Camera

1 Answer

SAMSUNG S860 Problem is Flash is not FUNCTIONING..


The camera may have a fault requiring professional service (probably not worthwhile unless you can get it done under warranty), HOWEVER, before you go there, check that you haven't put the camera into Macro mode. This is used for extreme close-ups and is represented by an icon of a little flower. When in Macro mode, the flash is disabled (also the camera won't focus well on subjects at normal distances).

Jan 26, 2011 | Samsung S860 Digital Camera

1 Answer

Cannot figure out how to take good macro shot with new Tamron len


With an SLR you only get true macro focussing on a lens that has proper macro focussing abilities. Unfortunately in the photogaraphy world, there are a huge number of lenses which claim to have macro ability but are stretching the term far too much.

Strictly speaking, macro means that the lens is capable of producing images on the sensor which are the same size as the actual subject or even bigger, at life size this is described as 1:1 macro. Your Tamron lens is only capable of a maximum 1:3.7 "macro", and that's only at the 200mm zoom setting with the subject no closer than 45cm from the lens. By SLR zoom lens standards, that's actually pretty good, but if you want to go closer and get greater magnification you need to either use a supplementary close-up filter lens or for better optical quality use a set of extension rings. The trade off with close up filter lenses is poor image quality and usually plenty of colour fringing and with extension rings is that if you're using a 2x magnification at 200mm, your f5-ish maximum aperture at 200mm becomes a very dark f10.

The only way to get good macro results is to either use a proper (=expensive) macro lens and excellent lighting, or use extension rings plus a good ring flash unit. However you can improve your macro by investing in a more capable zoom lens with a closer minimum focus distance and a better aperture at the telephoto end of the range. This can be expensive, or you can pick up some very cheap 35mm film SLR lenses. Using an adapter will never allow you to achieve infinity focus on a Canon digital SLR but you can get a close focussing 200mm f3.8 very cheaply. The crop factor of your smaller sensor means it will have the same angle of view as a 310mm lens but the aperture will remain at f3.8. As Canon digital SLR's have the deepest body register (lens to sensor distance) of the current systems then you'll also have the effect of using it on an extension ring. The downside is that you'll have to use the lens in a totally manual mode as no information will be communicated to your camera body. By mounting the lens back to front using a reversing ring you can achieve some really stunning macro magnifications but then you need a tripod, powerful flash and absolutely no wind... There was also a Makinon 80-200mm zoom which sells for next to nothing on auction websites, but it had a macro collar which allowed it to achieve around half size macro (1:2).

Alternatively, if the Fuji still works and does the job just keep it in your camera bag ready for those types of shots. overall, that seems the easiest and best solution unless you really want to get heavily into macro shooting.

I hope that I've helped you, please ask more if there's anything unclear. I've tried to keep a very complicated subject as simple as possible. Please also take a moment to rate my answer.

Mar 05, 2010 | Tamron 28-300mm f/3.5-6.3 DI XR for Canon

2 Answers

Macro shots on a cloudy day...


do you really need to use tohe zoom function when in macro mode? remember the lens has it limit on distance of the taken subject. Try to experiment without using the zoom and doing some distance adjustments

Aug 10, 2009 | Sony Cyber-shot DSC-H2 Digital Camera

1 Answer

Lens for Nikon D60


I will try to help you, but please understand that my experience is with Nikon film cameras. Assuming that the D60 works in a manner similar to a Nikon 35 mm body and that Sigma macro lens work like Nikon macro lens, you should be able to determine the usable subject to lens distance by experimentation. First, make sure the lens is in the macro mode. To do this you must set the auto-focus mode control to the manual focus mode (see your manual). On Nikon lenses, you must first set the focus ring to infinity, then move slider switch, which has two positions marked; "normal" and "macro., to the macro position. You should now be able to rotate the focus ring to the macro range. Use the zoom ring to zoom in and out and focus with the focus ring. The the range over which the lens to subject to lens distance will yield an in focus image will be rather limited and in the range of an inch or so to 6 or 8 inches.

Dec 09, 2008 | Cameras

1 Answer

Cannot get clear close-ups


Recommend not using flash. The first thing is that your subject should be well lit. Try placing it on a lighter background with good lighting around it. Also recommend using a tripod to keep the camera steady, and setting and using the camera's timer to take the photo (this also helps keep the camera steady). The closest auto-focused macro shot that the S200 takes is around 1 foot from the subject. Depress the shutter button halfway to verify that the subject is in focus (one of the three squares on the LCD should turn green on the subject). Next depress the shutter button all the way to take the photo.

Jan 24, 2007 | Canon PowerShot S200 / IXUS 178 Digital...

1 Answer

Is the wide converter attachable?


Wide converter can be attached by using the dedicated adaptor ring ZCA-300 and will provide equivalent to 26mm angle of view in 35mm film. The closest subject distance: Normal Recording mode: 70.5 cm (from CCD), 60 cm (from the front of wide converter) Macro mode : 20.5 cm (from CCD), 10 cm (from the front of wide converter) *1 Set the Lens acc. to Wide Converter. in the setup menu. (Optical zoom will be fixed at wide-angle end.) *2 Built-in flash can be used when attaching a filter, but shadowing may occur at the bottom of the image. In this case, use of program flash 5600HS(D), 3600HS(D), 2500(D) (sold separately) is recommended. *3 Filter with 52mm in diameter can be attached to the adapter ring.

Sep 13, 2005 | Konica Minolta DiMAGE Z3 Digital Camera

2 Answers

Focusing distance in macro mode


On a D-565 camera, The Macro Mode operating range is 8 inches to 20 inches. This means the camera must be between 8 inches and 20 inches away from the subject for a picture to be in focus.

Sep 01, 2005 | Olympus Camedia C-450 Zoom Digital Camera

1 Answer

White circles appear on the image. Why is That?


When shooting with flash in a location where there are many suspended particles, such as in a dusty area or on a snowy day, the image may contain white circles as shown in the picture below. Why does this happen? If the flash fires when a suspended particle floats right in front of the lens, the reflection of the flash from the particle appears more intensely than that of the subject, as the particle is much closer to the lens than the subject. Therefore, the reflection of the flash turns out in the image and causes an effect such as that shown in the sample image above. The closer the lens and strobe are located, allowing suspended particles to be exposed to more light, the more frequently this effect can occur. How can I avoid this effect? Ideally, it is best to shoot in locations where there are very few suspended particles. If not, you can use following method to prevent this effect. a) Avoid using flash by lighting the area as much as possible. b) If your camera has a zoom function, shoot at a wide angle. c) If you can attach an external flash, use the external flash to distance the flash from the lens.

Aug 31, 2005 | Canon PowerShot Pro1 Digital Camera

1 Answer

Circular Spots


When shooting with flash in a location where there are many suspended particles, such as in a dusty area or on a snowy day, the image may contain white circles as shown in the picture below. Why does this happen? If the flash fires when a suspended particle floats right in front of the lens, the reflection of the flash from the particle appears more intensely than that of the subject, as the particle is much closer to the lens than the subject. Therefore, the reflection of the flash turns out in the image and causes an effect such as that shown in the sample image above. The closer the lens and strobe are located, allowing suspended particles to be exposed to more light, the more frequently this effect can occur. How can I avoid this effect? Ideally, it is best to shoot in locations where there are very few suspended particles. If not, you can use following method to prevent this effect. a) Avoid using flash by lighting the area as much as possible. b) If your camera has a zoom function, shoot at a wide angle. c) If you can attach an external flash, use the external flash to distance the flash from the lens.

Aug 29, 2005 | Canon PowerShot 600 Digital Camera

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