Question about Fuji FinePix S5200 / S5600 Digital Camera

1 Answer

Time exposure shot

Can a long exposure shot be taken with this camera? Help! Second hand with no instruction manual. Thanks, Fran

Posted by on

1 Answer

  • Level 3:

    An expert who has achieved level 3 by getting 1000 points

    All-Star:

    An expert that got 10 achievements.

    MVP:

    An expert that got 5 achievements.

    President:

    An expert whose answer got voted for 500 times.

  • Master
  • 1,113 Answers

Hi - You can download the manual by clicking the link underlined in blue below:

FinePix S5200

The max exposure time is 15 seconds. See page 42:

time exposure shot - da1220e.jpg

Please take a moment to rate this solution & let us know if the information given was useful to you - Good Luck!

Informatica

Posted on Sep 03, 2008

Add Your Answer

Uploading: 0%

my-video-file.mp4

Complete. Click "Add" to insert your video. Add

×

Loading...
Loading...

Related Questions:

1 Answer

Can I manually adjust exposure and ISO on this camera?


Your camera is capable of full manual control once you turn the mode dial to "M". Your instruction manual should explain everything.

Jun 08, 2010 | Sony Cyber-Shot DSC-H1 Digital Camera

1 Answer

Sony DSC H-5 Camera slow response time


you might have switched the shooting process to timer mode. please refer the instruction manual to change it back to normal mode.normally there will be button near the lcd screen with the symbol of a timer deviice. if you click it once it sets the delay of shot to 2 sec and for the second time to 10 secs.and for the third time, it goes back to normal mode. thanks for using fixya. please dont forget to rate my solution!!!

May 29, 2009 | Digital Cameras

1 Answer

Using timer


Kodak EasyShare C613

Changing picture-taking settings
You can change settings to get the best results from your camera.
1Press the Menu button.
2Press to highlight a setting, then press OK.
3Choose an option, then press OK.
■Press the Menu button to exit the menu.
NOTE: To better understand each menu option, use camera Help. Highlight a menu choice, then press the button. Some settings remain until you change them; others, until you change modes or turn off the camera. Some modes offer limited settings.Press Menu, , and OK to access settings
Options
Self-timer
10 seconds (default)—
so you have time to get into the scene.
2 seconds—
for a steady, auto-shutter release on a tripod.
2-shot—
one picture is taken after a 10-second delay. A second picture is taken 8 seconds later.
Exposure Compensation
Increase or decrease brightness before taking a picture. (Also see page 27.)
0.0, -0.5, -1.0, -1.5, -2.0, +0.5, +1.0, +1.5, +2.0



From: http://www.kodak.com/global/plugins/acrobat/en/service/manuals/urg00711/C613_UG_GLB_en.pdf

If this helps, please post a rating for me. Thanks!

OpenSource13

Apr 19, 2009 | Kodak EasyShare C613 Digital Camera

1 Answer

Night and low-light specialty/experimental photography


Hello, thanks for the compliments!

First, yes, the Digital Rebel series of cameras (my first DSLR was the first Digital Rebel, the 300D model) have a small sensor than a "full frame" sensor, which results in a "multiplicationfactor" or "crop factor" of .6. This is good for telephoto shots (yourtelephoto lens ends up acting like a "longer" and more expensive lens) but bad for wideangle shots.

For Macro, you need very bright light to have enough light to use a small fstop for needed DoF because even at the smallest fstop (largest number) your DoF will still be very small. This typically means you need to use a strobe. The strobe will help freeze the image so you can still shoot hand-held. For hand-held use look for a "ring strobe" that fits around your lens and lights the item in front of your lens.

Focusing is a very tricky matter when you are shooting in macro. Usually you go to manual focus, set the lens to manually focus at either infinity or the closest distance, then you "focus" using the zoom, rather than the focus ring.

For night shots, you need to change to manual exposure and adjust to get the exposure you desire. Your camera's light meter doesn't know how bright or dark the thing you are viewing is - to the light meter everything you point it at is supposed to be exposed to medium gray - an average value. It can't know that you want a dark shot to stay dark.

Here's how I do it. First, I bump up the ISO so I can take a fast shot, and I set the camera to AV mode. Then I set the lens to the widest aperture (smallest number). I let the camera set the shutter speed as I take this test shot, and look at the exposure. Then I determine if I want the shot darker and if so how much. Now I switch to manual mode - same aperture and shutter as the previous shot, and adjust the shutter speed faster to produce a darker image. When I have the right settings, then I adjust the ISO and as I adjust the ISO I have to compensate with the shutter. E.g. if I have a good exposure at ISO 1600 @ f2.8 @ 1/30, to drop to ISO 100 means I have to slow the shutter to 1/2 second. Now, I usually also want a smaller aperture (larger number). To go from ISO 100 @ f2/8 @ 1/2 second to f/16 is 6 stops, which takes the time needed from 1/2 second to 15 seconds. Obviously this means the camera needs to be on a tripod.

I can help more if you can give me a link to some of the photos you have taken so far so I can see what you are shooting, and make suggestions for how I would approach the same subject and situation.

Dec 15, 2008 | Canon EOS Rebel XSi Digital Camera

1 Answer

Shots taken


It is useful for the pro to know the settings automatically at every exposure.But if you dont like you can avoid it by going through the menu.You select "No" to display info or preview

Mar 11, 2008 | Nikon D40x Digital Camera

1 Answer

Extremely long time writing to CF card


IIRC these cameras support a noise reduction feature through a custom function. The camera will take a second exposure with the shutter closed (i.e. against something pure black) to see which pixels in the camera are "hot", and then will use that information to remove that hot pixel noise from the original image. "hot" pixels depend on temperature and exposure length so the camera would need to do this on every shot.

Mar 05, 2008 | Canon Rebel XT / EOS 350D Digital Camera

1 Answer

Taking a photo of the family, delaying the camera until I can get into the shot.


Sure, follow these steps...
  • Set everyone in an even composition, close together, maybe some standing, some sitting, whatever strikes you as a good picture.
  • Put the camera on a tripod or other tall article
  • Press the Mountain/Macro/Timer button until the (clock/timer) icon is displayed on the viewer. The button to press is just above the MF (Manual Focus letters)
  • Press the shutter button all the way down to activate the timer.
    • Press once for ten-second delay
    • Press twice for three-second delay
    • Press a third time to stop the timer
  • Jump into the shot! =)
The lamp next to the lens will start to blink and continue until one second before the picture is taken. The lamp will then stay solid during the last second to warn about the picture being taken.

Please rate FixYa!, ThankYa!

Dec 15, 2007 | Nikon Coolpix 4500 Digital Camera

2 Answers

Blinking hand and exclamation point- less focus


It's a vibration indicator. My camera has just begun doing it too. It's on P.17 of the manual.

Oct 23, 2007 | Sony Cyber-Shot DSC-P200 Digital Camera

Not finding what you are looking for?
Fuji FinePix S5200 / S5600 Digital Camera Logo

Related Topics:

190 people viewed this question

Ask a Question

Usually answered in minutes!

Top Fuji Digital Cameras Experts

kakima

Level 3 Expert

96417 Answers

Donald DCruz
Donald DCruz

Level 3 Expert

17129 Answers

Tony

Level 3 Expert

2598 Answers

Are you a Fuji Digital Camera Expert? Answer questions, earn points and help others

Answer questions

Manuals & User Guides

Loading...