Tip & How-To about Cameras

Flashing photos on a Nikon camera

You're seeing blown-out highlights. Those are the portions of your photos that have been so badly overexposed that they've gone pure white, losing all detail. This is generally considered a bad thing and thus the camera is warning you about it. The proper fix is to reduce exposure so as to bring back highlight details. This risks losing details in the shadows as they go pure black, but that is generally considered not as bad as losing highlight details since we don't expect to see things in the dark. However, the camera doesn't know what effect you're striving for. Sometimes blown-out highlights are perfectly acceptable, thus the camera merely warns you that it's happening.

That was the long answer. The short answer is to press up/down on the multiselector to cycle through different views of your pictures.

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1 Answer

After taking pictures with bright colors, image in the viewer blink black/white over brightly lit objects...Help, it's making me crazy!


You're seeing blown-out highlights. These are the portions of your picture that have been so overexposed that they've gone pure white, losing all detail. This is generally considered a bad thing so the camera is warning you about it. But the camera doesn't know what you're taking a picture of, things like the sun reflecting off polished chrome should go pure white, so it's just a warning.

Usually the proper fix is to reduce exposure, bringing back the lost details. This risks losing details in the shadows as they go pure black, but that's generally considered not as bad. After all, we don't expect to see things in the dark.

That was the long answer. The short answer is to press up/down on the multiselector to cycle through the different views of your picture.

May 18, 2011 | Nikon D80 Digital Camera with 18-55mm Lens

1 Answer

I have a D3100 Nikon and when I look at photos on the screen of the camera certain parts of the images flash black


You're seeing blown-out highlights. These are the portions of your photos that have been so overexposed that they've gone pure white, losing all detail. The camera doesn't know whether you were deliberately going for this effect, but this is generally considered a bad thing and so the camera is warning you about it. The proper fix is to use exposure compensation to reduce exposure and shoot again to bring back the highlight details. This risks losing details in the shadows as they go pure black, but this is generally considered not as bad. After all, we don't expect to see details in the dark.

That was the long answer. The short answer is to press up/down on the multiselector to cycle through the different views of your photo until you see one you prefer.

Jan 27, 2011 | Nikon Cameras

2 Answers

My nikon d3000 has suddenly started flashing, the White parts of the photo only, can you help?


You're seeing blown-out highlights. Those are the portions of your photos which have been overexposed so much that all details have been lost and gone pure white. Of course, the camera doesn't know whether you were going for that effect and the blinking is only a warning. Blown-out highlights are generally considered a bad thing, and the correct remedy is to reduce exposure to bring up the details. This risks losing details in the dark areas and the shadows, but this is not considered as bad. After all, we don't expect to see things in the dark.

That was the long answer. The short answer is, repeatedly press up/down on the multiselector to cycle through the different views of your photo until you find one you like.

Sep 22, 2010 | Nikon Cameras

1 Answer

When i view photos on the lcd screen. The photo with the bright parts will turn black and white, like blinking.


You're seeing blown-out highlights. Those are the portions of your photo that have been overexposed and lost all detail, going pure white. This is a warning, since the camera doesn't know whether you're going for this effect. Blown-out highlights are generally considered a bad thing, and the proper fix is to reduce exposure to bring back the details. This risks losing details in the dark shadows but this isn't considered as bad, since we don't expect to see things in the dark.

That was the long answer. The short answer is to press up/down on the multiselector to cycle through the different views of your photo.

Sep 19, 2010 | Nikon D90 Digital Camera with 18-105mm...

1 Answer

theLCD screen that you view pictures with keeps flashing black to white or gives the look of a negative. Thank You!


You're seeing blown-out highlights. Those are the portions of your photo that have been overexposed so much that they've gone pure white and lost all details. This is generally considered a bad thing, but this is only a warning: the camera doesn't know what kind of effects you're trying for.

The correct fix is to reduce exposure to bring back the highlight details. This may result in losing detail in the shadows, but that's generally considered to be not as bad. After all, we don't expect to see things in the dark.

That was the long answer. The short answer is to press up/down on the multiselector until you find a view you like.

Sep 16, 2010 | Nikon D40x Digital Camera

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