Tip & How-To about Computers & Internet

How to play guitar using a computer

Playing a guitar using a PC at home is a simple process that some audio devices and a computer to an analog line or microphone port on your sound card to obtain. There are two kinds of freeware, that a user can provide to the task. Basic freeware that standard on any Windows computer, including audio drivers free, microphone input, even if the computer's speakers to play. Users to make recordings of your own burning freeware, however, were interested in Windows freeware called "Sound Recorder" can do the work in the most elementary sense.


1. Plug the Phono-style audio cable into the guitar phono audio jack.


2. Connect the large to small-RCA adapter to the end of the other side of the RCA cable.


3. Connect the adapter cable and phono large on the back of the computer through a computer microphone.


4. Adjust audio properties of the system from the Start menu and Control Panel of your computer to play audio into the microphone port on the speaker. The exact process of adjusting the settings may be proprietary software, the sound card came with the computer system vary. If you have problems, ask the help documentation for software and manual for your computer sound. On most systems, the microphone volume level using the properties menu of the extended microphone system sound settings.


5. Set the switch to the guitar pickup - the pickup is a version of power - the "on" position. Adjust the volume on the computer so the computer speakers clearly the natural sound of the guitar can be heard.


6. Play a few notes on the guitar. If your computer speakers to play the guitar sound, the method proved unsuccessful.

Posted by on

Computers & Internet Logo

Related Topics:

Related Questions:

1 Answer

ConnectLand cl-me 606 goose neckdesktop microphone to desktop


Look for a 3.5 mm microphone port on the computer. Usually the port on the back of the desktop will have a pink surround. (There will be other ports there; the usual minimum are the green port for speakers and blue one for line-in.) Put the 3.5 mm jack on the end of the cord on the microphone into the port. If you have an add-in sound card, use the microphone port on the sound card.

Some machines will also have a front panel microphone port. This will have a small mike icon next to the port.

Next you need to ensure that the audio device is set to Microphone. For Windows systems (Vista/7/8), enter the Control Panel and go to the Hardware and Sound panel. Click on Manage Audio Devices under Sound. Then click on the Recording tab. Check if the microphone listed as plugged in. Make this the default recording device. (XP has a slightly different name for the panel.) For XP through Windows 7, click on the start button and then find the Control Panel listed on the right. For Windows 8, from the desktop, press the Ctrl and X keys at the same time. Then find the Control Panel in the list. (Alternatively, activate the Charms menu, Ctrl+C or hover on the upper right of the screen. Move down and click on the gear (Settings). Then select the Control Panel.)

If the computer doesn't indicate that the microphone is plugged in, make sure that the 3.5 mm plug is in the correct port. Next try the microphone on another computer. The audio card port could be damaged or the microphone cable could be faulty. If the microphone works on another computer, you can try a USB audio adapter (StarTech ICUSBAUDIO or similar) or a new sound card. (Note: some older sound cards do not work properly on newer versions of Windows. If you have a sound card installed and the motherboard has an on-board audio device, remove the sound card. Enable the on-board audio in the computer's BIOS. Install the appropriate audio drivers. Try that audio device. Accessing the BIOS will depend on computer. Often you can press Esc, F1, F2, F10 or Delete repeatedly after you turn on the computer. If Windows starts to boot, turn off the system and try again.) If another computer doesn't recognize the microphone, I'd recommend a new microphone. Fixing the cable isn't worth the effort.

I hope this helps.

Cindy Wells

Sep 20, 2013 | Computers & Internet

1 Answer

under device manager where to locate microphone option


Your microphone would only show up under Device Manager if it is a USB microphone. If you are using analog, 2.3mm jack (looks like a headphone jack only red), then you won't see it there.
For WinXP you want to be looking under Control Panel, Sounds and Audio Devices to see and configure settings for your speakers, microphone, etc.
What is shown under Device Manager, if you aren't using a USB microphone, is the sound card. This is because your headphone and microphone ports are connected to the sound card in your computer.

Jul 06, 2012 | Computers & Internet

1 Answer

i can't find where my microphone goes


Is your computer a laptop or a desktop? How old is it? Which make/model of computer do you have?

For an older desktop, the microphone input will be on the back of the computer. There are usually three 3.5 mm jacks for audio connections. The pink connector is for the microphone. The black connector is for Line In and the green is line out (speakers). Often they are towards the far side of the motherboard connections from any PS2 (keyboard and mouse) ports. Otherwise, they will line up with one of the card slots.

Newer desktop computers often have additional audio ports for surround sound. However, the pink jack for the microphone is standard. If the computer has front audio ports, you may find that the same color labels the jacks. Otherwise look closely at the icons next to the ports. These will be in addition to the back audio ports.

Laptops can have the audio ports on the front, back or side depending on the model. There will be a small icon with a stand microphone indicated for the microphone port.

If you have one of the newer USB microphones, plug it into an available USB port.

If the computer has no working audio ports, either get a USB microphone or add a sound card.

I hope this helps. If you add a comment with your computer's brand and model number, I'll try to provide the exact audio port details. (There are some computer motherboards that do not have on-board audio and you will need a sound card.)

Cindy Wells
(on Windows computers, you may have to change the default audio input. Click Start > Control Panel > Hardware and Sound > Sound > Manage Audio Devices. (for Windows 7) For other versions of Windows, you may find slightly different titles in the Control Panel.)

Jun 24, 2011 | Compaq PC Microphone (Black or Beige)...

2 Answers

Can't get a signal with my Tascam US-144


Make sure the Tascam is has updated drivers. The latest driver is Version 1.12. Something that helped me as well was to re-route my sound card to the Tascam. Meaning to have Windows, use the Tascam as the sound card for the computer.

This is the advice I followed from a forum it helped me alot!

I eventually disabled all other sound cards on my PC. In my case it was simply the integrated soundcard on my motherboard. I did this in the bios setting. I also uninstalled the drivers for it, just in case. I was having problems hearing anything in Cubase before I did this.

I set the US-144 as my default sound device in Windows (Control Panel>Sounds and Audio Devices>Audio)

I'm not sure what you are trying to record so I will give you a guitar example.

Guitar plugged directly into LINE/GUITAR IN R using the 1/4" jack with the switch above it in the GUITAR position. You can use the INPUT R dial to adjust the input volume for this channel. The SIG/OL light should turn green when you strum the guitar.

The US-144 is plugged into a USB 2.0 port on the PC.

Speakers are plugged into the LINE OUT jacks on the back of the US-144. The MON MIX dial will adjust what goes out through these jacks. If you move the dial all the way to the left, you will hear the input from the guitar directly from the US-144. If you move the dial all the way to the right, the signal goes through the US-144, into the PC via the USB connection, then back to the US-144 through the USB cable, and then out through the line out jacks. You may not hear anything when it is all the way to the right until you have Cubase open and configured properly. IMPORTANT NOTE: If you have MON MIX dial turned all the way to INPUT, you will not hear anything being output from your computer.

The LINE OUT dial adjusts the volume through the LINE OUT jacks. Make sure this isn't turned all the way down.

At this point, you should be able to turn the MON MIX dial all the way to INPUT and hear your guitar. It will probably only be coming out of the Right speaker, which is what it should be doing. Now turn the MON MIX dial back to somewhere in the middle so you can hear both the input from the guitar and your PC.

I downloaded and installed any updates that were available for Cubase LE 4 (I think all I needed was the 4.1.3 hotfix).

In Cubase goto Devices>Device Setup>VST Audio System and choose the US-122L /US-144 ASIO driver from the pull down menu. I'm not sure how important the "Relase Driver when Application is in Background" checkbox is, but mine is unchecked. If you click on the US-122L / US-144 section, you will see a button for the Control Panel. It will tell you what your driver and firmware are and what USB mode you are operationg in, etc. I didn't mess with any of these settings, but it is good to know how to get there. You should also see all your in's and outs. I have 2 analog in's and out's and 2 digital in's and out's. I am only using the analog in's and out's. Hit OK to close out this menu.

Now goto Devices>VST Connections and you should get a new window. There is an "Inputs" tab and an "Outputs" tab. Under Outputs, you should have a Bus for Stereo Out using the US-144 as your Audio Device and the US-144 Analog outs for the device ports. Make sure the "CLICK" colum is checked if you want to hear your Cubase metronome through your speakers. If you don't have a bus, add one and set it up as I have described.

Now goto the Inputs tab and add a mono input using the US-144 analog in R as the Device Port.

Now start a new project and add an Audio track using the Mono in and stereo output. Use the Edit Channel Setting button if you have to change your input and output.

Now with the MON MIX dial all the way to the right and with the Monitor button enabled on your audio track, you should be able to hear your guitar through Cubase.

Now if you turn on the Record Enable Button on your track and then press the Transport Record button, you should be able to record your guitar. Hit stop and then go to the beginning of the track and hit play. You should be able to hear what you just recorded. Don't forget that if the MON MIX dial is all the way to the left, you won't hear anything from your computer.

Well that is my Cubase LE / Tascam US-144 Getting started guide written by a newbie for newbies. May my pain and suffering alleviate some of yours. Good luck.

Dec 26, 2008 | Tascam US-144 Sound Card

Not finding what you are looking for?

1,157 people viewed this tip

Ask a Question

Usually answered in minutes!

Top Computers & Internet Experts

Doctor PC
Doctor PC

Level 3 Expert

7733 Answers

kakima

Level 3 Expert

102366 Answers

David Payne
David Payne

Level 3 Expert

14161 Answers

Are you a Computer and Internet Expert? Answer questions, earn points and help others

Answer questions

Loading...