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Wireless Tip: Does you wireless router keep disconnecting / dropping the connection?

Home wireless networks that are based on the 802.11b or 802.11g/n standards transmit their signal in a narrow radio frequency range of 2.4 GHz. Various other electronic devices in a home, such as cordless phones, garage door openers, baby monitors, and microwave ovens, may use this same frequency range. Any such device can interfere with a Wi-FI home network, slowing down its performance and potentially breaking network connections.

The 2.4 GHz Wi-Fi signal range is divided into a number of smaller bands or "channels," similar to television channels. Many wireless products ship with a default Wi-Fi channel of 6. If encountering interference from other devices within the home, consider changing the channel up or down to avoid it. Some Wi-Fi channel numbers overlap with each other. Channel 1 uses the lowest frequency band and each subsequent channel increases the frequency slightly. Therefore, the further apart two channel numbers are, the less the degree of overlap and likelihood of interference.


If this won't work, try to update or upgrade your wireless network device driver software. Visit your PC/Wireless device manufacturer's website and look for the appropriate updated driver. If the problem continues after doing all these, then consider buying a new wireless router as your current is deemed broken.

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keeps dropping internet. the internet light on router flashes. i have to power it down and then it works for a while


Home wireless networks based on the 802.11b or 802.11g standards transmit their signal in a narrow radio frequency range of 2.4 GHz. Various other electronic devices in a home, such as cordless phones, garage door openers, baby monitors, and microwave ovens, may use this same frequency range. Any such device can interfere with a Wi-FI home network, slowing down its performance and potentially breaking network connections.
The 2.4 GHz Wi-Fi signal range is divided into a number of smaller bands or "channels," similar to television channels.Many wireless products ship with a default Wi-Fi channel of 6. If encountering interference from other devices within the home, consider changing the channel up or down to avoid it. Some Wi-Fi channel numbers overlap with each other. Channel 1 uses the lowest frequency band and each subsequent channel increases the frequency slightly. Therefore, the further apart two channel numbers are, the less the degree of overlap and likelihood of interference.
If this won't work, Then consider buying a new wireless router as your current is deemed broken.

Dec 15, 2010 | Belkin F5D72344 Wireless G Router 54Mbps...

1 Answer

internet fails every day and i have to unplug modem wait afew minutes and internet comes back


Try changing your wireless channel.
Home wireless networks based on the 802.11b or 802.11g standards transmit their signal in a narrow radio frequency range of 2.4 GHz. Various other electronic devices in a home, such as cordless phones, garage door openers, baby monitors, and microwave ovens, may use this same frequency range. Any such device can interfere with a Wi-FI home network, slowing down its performance and potentially breaking network connections.
The 2.4 GHz Wi-Fi signal range is divided into a number of smaller bands or "channels," similar to television channels.Many wireless products ship with a default Wi-Fi channel of 6. If encountering interference from other devices within the home, consider changing the channel up or down to avoid it. Some Wi-Fi channel numbers overlap with each other. Channel 1 uses the lowest frequency band and each subsequent channel increases the frequency slightly. Therefore, the further apart two channel numbers are, the less the degree of overlap and likelihood of interference.
If this won't work, Then consider buying a new wireless router as your current is deemed broken.

Dec 08, 2010 | Computers & Internet

1 Answer

unstable connection


ome wireless networks based on the 802.11b or 802.11g standards transmit their signal in a narrow radio frequency range of 2.4 GHz. Various other electronic devices in a home, such as cordless phones, garage door openers, baby monitors, and microwave ovens, may use this same frequency range. Any such device can interfere with a Wi-FI home network, slowing down its performance and potentially breaking network connections.
The 2.4 GHz Wi-Fi signal range is divided into a number of smaller bands or "channels," similar to television channels.Many wireless products ship with a default Wi-Fi channel of 6. If encountering interference from other devices within the home, consider changing the channel up or down to avoid it. Some Wi-Fi channel numbers overlap with each other. Channel 1 uses the lowest frequency band and each subsequent channel increases the frequency slightly. Therefore, the further apart two channel numbers are, the less the degree of overlap and likelihood of interference.
If this won't work, Then consider buying a new wireless router as your current is deemed broken.

Nov 21, 2010 | D-Link 802.11g Wireless Router WBR-1310...

1 Answer

The Wireless router in our house is resetting itself every few minutes disconnecting all of our devices. I've tried manual resets and recently had a repairman out here to adress the problem. He claimed to fix it but the system is still on the fritz. I have no idea where to even start so any and all suggestions are appriciated.


Home wireless networks based on the 802.11b or 802.11g standards transmit their signal in a narrow radio frequency range of 2.4 GHz. Various other electronic devices in a home, such as cordless phones, garage door openers, baby monitors, and microwave ovens, may use this same frequency range. Any such device can interfere with a Wi-FI home network, slowing down its performance and potentially breaking network connections.
The 2.4 GHz Wi-Fi signal range is divided into a number of smaller bands or "channels," similar to television channels.Many wireless products ship with a default Wi-Fi channel of 6. If encountering interference from other devices within the home, consider changing the channel up or down to avoid it. Some Wi-Fi channel numbers overlap with each other. Channel 1 uses the lowest frequency band and each subsequent channel increases the frequency slightly. Therefore, the further apart two channel numbers are, the less the degree of overlap and likelihood of interference.
If this won't work, Then consider buying a new wireless router as your current is deemed broken.
Good Luck.

Nov 10, 2010 | D-Link AirPlus DI-614+ Wireless Router

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