Tip & How-To about Cameras

DIY Pop-up Flash Diffuser

Wanting to lessen the power of your flash with under exposing your picture/subject?
Want to add natural light bounce to your subject and lessen shadows?
Wanting to have a pop-up flash diffuser without spending a dime?How about removing shadow cast when doing some macro shots?
If your answer to these questions are YES, then time to read this DIY guide. This should be easy to follow and the material(s) needed should be available in your home.
First, let's briefly discuss what a diffuser is. A diffuser lessens the strong/ harsh light coming from your camera's built-in pop-up flash, creating a softer and distributes the light evenly on your picture.
There are lots of pop up diffusers out there and are relatively cheap. However here's one that I've tried and tested and worked fine for me. Take the cap of your empty roll-on(deo) place it with your hand, right at the front of the pop-up flash(in it's popped out position). Then take a picture using flash. Try it with and w/o the cap to see the difference. Not impressed? Try it first and explore new ways of getting better pictures.

Posted by on

Cameras Logo

Related Topics:

Related Questions:

1 Answer

background is overexposed


So, the problem doesn't seem to be the flash if the actual subject in the foreground is exposed properly. My guess is that the background is being lit by another light source. Typically, your camera uses a flash for dark areas or what it gauges as a dark area. This doesn't adjust the background for additional light sources. For example, if you're standing outside and there's a tree covering someone that you're taking a picture of your flash will adjust to "properly" light that individual. However, because the flash was used for the main subject, the background is actually now overexposed. The overexposed background will show up as a brightly lit area because the camera had to adjust for the foreground. This will actually reverse itself when it's dark out - meaning if the background and foreground are dark, the flash will expose the foreground, but the background will be black. Hopefully, that helps you understand lighting and exposure. Now, to fix this problem when shooting, you would need to consider several options - 1. SLR camera with aperture and f-stop settings as well as compensation controls. This will allow you to control every element of the exposure, but you still need to be aware of the lighting behind the "subject" to properly expose your shots. 2. backlighting compensation - common settings on both SLR and point and shoot cameras that makes auto lighting conversions for backlighting and other common lighting issues. Test whatever options are on your camera to see what works best for your specific problem. 3. Photoshop retouching - you may take one shot with your subject exposed properly and a second shot with the background then merge the images together. 4. using a tripod to shoot without using the flash - this may give you the closest exposure to exactly what you see when looking at your subject.

Dec 19, 2008 | Polaroid i733LP Digital Camera

1 Answer

Canon 40D


Hey D1ppy,
There are two ways to get rid of shadows behind a subject, but both require you to use a hotshoe mounted flash. The first way is to bounce the light off a ceiling or some other white surface by turning the flash head towards that surface instead of your subject. The second way would be to connect the flash to the camera using a off camera flash cord and hold the flash above your head when your taking the picture, and by doing this you are able to aim where the shadows show up in the image. Bounced flash is what is called soft light and generally is more pleasing light. I of course am assuming the shadows are caused by the built in flash on the camera. I hope this helps!

Sincerely,
Allan
Go Ahead. Use Us.

May 30, 2008 | Canon EOS 40D Digital Camera

1 Answer

Using Flash


The Flash is useful up to approximately six feet, after which distance the light is less effective. The Flash is good for close subjects in low light. The Flash is not good to use when taking pictures in large rooms with low light or night / evening scenes. When the Flash is used, the shutter speed is automatically faster to compensate for the light from the flash. This means less natural light through the lens. This can cause dark images in large rooms or evening scenes. In this case, TURN OFF THE FLASH and allow the shutter speed to automatically slow down to adjust for natural light. Your images will be more bright. Be careful, slower shutter also means more potential for blur from motion by you or your subjects.

Sep 11, 2005 | Toshiba PDR-3300 Digital Camera

1 Answer

reduce shadow


All solid objects cast a shadow; it cannot be avoided. Certain techniques will help control or reduce the shadow by eliminating or reducing the harshness of the flash. Some of these techniques are: Elevate, eliminate or soften the flash: Make sure the flash is above the lens when you camera is turned to vertical (portrait) orientation. If the on-camera flash is higher than the subject, the lens should not "see" the shadow in most situations. Make sure the camera is higher than the subject, but not so high that you make a shadow in the other direction (under your subject's eyebrows, nose or chin, for example). If there is enough natural light, you might be able to turn the flash off, or you can add "natural" light to the scene by opening curtains, turning on room lights, and so on. In low light you can still photograph without the flash by making sure the camera does not move during the exposure. Consider using a tripod or monopod. The auto color balance feature should automatically adjust the color for the light source. Sometimes it is helpful (at least minimally) to include a white or near neutral grey item within the camera's field of view to assist the camera's color balance assessment. Mixed lighting gives mixed results. Illuminate, eliminate, or move away from the object that has the shadow cast upon it (a wall, for example). Or, use it to your advantage by angling for a better position that may bounce and diffuse the light from the on-camera flash by reflecting light off the wall. Some photographers might lay a white sheet in front of the subject to soften the light by bouncing the light off the ceiling.

Aug 29, 2005 | Kodak EasyShare CX7530 Digital Camera

1 Answer

pictures reddish or orange


Although normal room lights (tungsten lights) appear white to our eyes, their light is actually much "warmer" than daylight, giving a reddish or orange color to pictures. This happens with digital and film cameras. To prevent or lessen this reddish or orange color: If your digital camera has a selectable White Balance mode (check your camera's User's Guide) and you are not using the camera or external flash, set the White Balance mode for "Tungsten" light. If your pictures are reddish even when you use the camera flash or external flash, the room lighting is overpowering the flash. Try setting the White Balance mode for "Tungsten" and continue to use the flash. If your camera does not have a selectable White Balance mode, use the camera flash or external flash when taking pictures in lighting that makes your pictures turn out reddish or orange. If you can, turn down or turn off one of the room lights (without making the room too dark), or move your subject so that it is not being hit directly by the room lights. If you can, when taking pictures in the daytime, try opening any drapes that might be covering windows. Letting in natural daylight improves the color quality of the lighting.

Aug 29, 2005 | Kodak EasyShare One Digital Camera

Not finding what you are looking for?

1,203 people viewed this tip

Ask a Question

Usually answered in minutes!

Top Cameras Experts

kakima

Level 3 Expert

102366 Answers

Donald DCruz
Donald DCruz

Level 3 Expert

17130 Answers

yadayada
yadayada

Level 3 Expert

76691 Answers

Are you a Camera Expert? Answer questions, earn points and help others

Answer questions

Loading...