Tip & How-To about Heating & Cooling

Water leak in split a/c.

When compressor pumps the vapor of the freon passes through condenser coil pipelines where the heat removed by fan and becomes low pressure low temp and then travels as liquid. By removal of heat in the room again the freon get vaporized and sent to compressor. In this cycling if your indoor coil is dust blocked the room heat can't be removed. resulting this the liquid becomes forming ice over the coil. And when it cut off by coil temp, the fan only will work and ice get defrosted and water spray thr' vent.Due to coil block and makes airlock to drain pipeline. Resulting to water leak inside.To avoid water leaking service your a/c periodically.

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My Dometic Rooftop 15000 BTU Model 459516.701CO will come on and run and then shut off it continues to cycle within minutes of shutting off it is controlled by a Dometic Comfort Control Center 2 Thermostat. I have cleaned the coils on the entire unit outside and in so it is not a heat exchange problem what could be making the pump cycle in and out without reaching temp in the trailer.


THE OUTSIDE FAN MOTOR MIGHT NOT BE WORKING CAUSING THE COMPRESSOR TO GET HOT AND TRIP THE INTERNAL OVERLOAD IN THE COMPRESSOR - IF THE UNIT IS LOW IN FREON SAME RESULTS - WHEN UNIT IS FIRST TURNED ON DOES IT BLOW COLD AIR OR DOES THE AIR NOR FEEL COOL - JUST COOL AIR COULD BE LOW FREON - COLD THEN WARMS UP IS FAN PROBLEM

Jun 30, 2014 | Dometic Rooftop RV Air Conditioner

1 Answer

air conditioning not too cold ??


Hello,
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Let me explain in layman's terms how the air conditioning (AC) system works and what could be happening to your car.

Like your body, the air conditioning compressor is the heart of the AC system, and Freon is the blood. The compressor pumps Freon throughout the AC system, either the older type R12 which costs as much as gold it seems these days, or the new environmentally-friendly R134A Freon. This Freon is a gas and liquid combination that is compressed and circulated throughout the air conditioning system. The compressed Freon is pushed through the system under pressure and is passed through different sized metal and rubber hoses and a special valve called an expansion valve that cause the gas to expand and contract.

This expansion and contraction makes the Freon gas very cold. This cold gas makes its way via metal lines into the dash area of your vehicle to the evaporator core. This evaporator core is like a small radiator, except it has cold Freon circulating inside and not hot antifreeze. A small fan (the AC blower fan which you control from the control panel on the dash) sits in front of the evaporator core and blows air across this cold evaporator and then through the vents inside your vehicle.

The other objective of the air conditioning system is to remove the heat from inside the cab of the vehicle. This heat is removed by the Freon with the help of the AC condenser located at the front of the car (usually in front of the radiator). The Freon coming back from the evaporator carries the heat from the cab to the condenser via rubber and metal hoses. Just like your radiator, the condenser is lightweight aluminum with many internal winding coils.
The Freon travels through these coils, and in between these coils are small slits or fins that the Freon is forced through. The condenser will have an electric cooling fan mounted in front or behind it to push or pull air through these fins to remove the heat from the Freon. Some vehicles still use the old fashioned fan blade driven by the engine to pull air across the radiator and the condenser.
Now I know that is just a tidbit of information on how the air conditioning system works, and it is very general, but I wanted you to know what to look for to give you insight as to what might be happening with your vehicle.
A few causes of low cooling efficiency or no cooling at all at idle are:

Lack of air flow across the condenser. Make sure the electric cooling fan motor near the condenser is coming on, or in models that are equipped with a fan blade make sure this fan is turning and is turning very fast.

Low Freon levels. Freon level and pressure should be checked by your certified air conditioning mechanic.

Overheating. If the engine is running hot or overheating, it can have a noticeable negative affect on the air conditioning system. Some cars have two electric cooling fans, one for the air conditioning condenser and the other for the radiator. Make sure they are both working properly. Usually at idle on a hot day with the AC on both fans will be on.

When the vehicle is traveling at freeway speeds, the compressor is pumping the Freon throughout the system much faster and harder than at idle. There is a dramatic increase in air flow across the condenser due to 55 mph winds, and the engine is usually operating at a cooler, more efficient temperature as well, thus allowing the air conditioning system to operate efficiently.
Note: An air conditioning system that is somewhat low on Freon can still feel comfortable at freeway speeds due to the added air flow across the condenser which can overcome the ill effects of slightly low Freon. Periodic air conditioning performance checks by your mechanic are the best way to keep the system in great shape.

Hope this helps.

Goodluck

Oct 08, 2010 | 1998 Cadillac DeVille

2 Answers

for my thesis: 5 condenser problems and 5 solutions


Problem number one.

condenser fan won't come on. solution check the capacitor if good ohm out the fan to see if it is bad. If bad replace fan motor with new one.

2. compressor will not come on. solution check the contactor to see if engaging this applies to problem 1 also. If engages check the capacitor on the herm side if it is bad replace. If good check compressor to see if the compressor is bad. Should it be bad replace compressor.

3. High head pressure not cooling properly dirty condenser coils. Clean coils. With hose and water.

4. Low head pressure frosting accruing on suction line. Check freon levels. Also check inside air filter for being dirty.

5. Condenser unit is failing to come on. solution check the power source check the contactor should the main power be bad check main breaker and replace any slow blow fuses that are bad. Should the contactor be bad check transformer to ensure 24 volts going to secondary side on contactor. Inspect the two wire going to outside unit condenser. replace any broken wire any bad transformer or bad contactor.

Feb 21, 2010 | Carrier 38CKC042 Air Conditioner

1 Answer

the compressor suddenly trip off and it runs and after few minutes it trip off again


Compressor tipping is typically due to overheating. A single bimetal disc thermostat (e.g. Klixon brand device) in located within the motor windings within hermetically sealed compressors which will cut off motor current after the local windings have sufficiently overheated.

Unfortunately, by the time this limiter has activated, the compressor motor and pump has typically already suffered mild to major damage.

Compressor overheating is typically a result of low freon. The freon, besides cooling the compressor, also carries the lubricant, so low freon results in a hot compressor with poor lubrication, with some degree of permanent damage by the time the internal limiter has activated.

There are a few other possibilities, depending on system design, but some version of the above scenario is typical.

When the compressor runs hot, this also initiates chemical changes in the freon and oil resulting in acids with further attack both the compressor pump, motor windings and motor bearings, a viscous circle.

Compressor overheating can also be a result of contaminants circulating within the freon or evolving mechanical failure problems within the compressor pump or motor.

Better systems (very few high end residential central AC systems) include OEM or field installed high freon pressure and low freon pressure cut out switches connected to circuits which stop the compressor and keep it off when pressure are well beyond desired.
These are far more effective in protecting the compressor and preventing permanent damage.

Additional protection options are a compressor discharge temperature limit switch (shuts off the compressor if the outlet freon goes well above desirable outlet temps), and a flow switch which sense adequate condenser fan air flow and only allows the compressor to run when adequate air flow is present (a second or so after the condenser fan has started). (Since condenser air flow is what removes all the system and interior heat, the compressor should not run unless airflow is appropriate.)

While all the above 4 safety device strategies are relatively inexpensive, they are not present in the vast majority of residential AC systems sold in the US.

Jan 06, 2010 | Carrier Heating & Cooling

1 Answer

reversing valve


The first thing you need to do is fix the hole in the coil. It will only get worse no matter what you do. The reversing valve is controlled by the thermostat, then to the defrost board, as it has a timer, sensor and all that jazz. As to your question, that is a tricky one. The way I found worked best for heat pumps is to turn it to cool. If its so cold outside that it will not turn on because of an outside thermostat, cover the coil and yourself with a cardboard box or a large tarp. Give yourself some room of course, get a set of gauges that has temp. ring for R-22.Take suction temp. from the line about 1 foot from the compressor, look at the low side of the gauge and find the temperature, not the pressure for R-22. You should have a 20 degree differential. If more than 20, add freon, less remove. This sounds a little odd, but its easy to overcharge heat pumps on the heat mode. The condenser has a sensor that switches on the electric heat if the heat pump is not working. Ice on the condenser is normal on heat mode, that's why there is a defrost board.

Jan 12, 2008 | Heating & Cooling

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