Tip & How-To about Cameras

How does aperture setting affect a photograph?

The aperture is the opening in the lens through which light passes to the image sensor. Changing the aperture setting allows you to control the depth of field of a photograph. When the aperture is opened to a widersetting, (indicated by a lower f-stop number) more light is passed to the imagesensor, creating more shallow depth of field. Closing the aperture (indicatedby a higher f-stop number) allows less light to pass to the image sensor,creating wider depth of field.

NOTE: The aperture setting is one of three primary settings usedto control the overall exposure of a photograph. The other two primary settingsare ISO and shutter speed. Because the three settings work together to produce the overall exposure for a photograph, changingthe aperture setting will require complimentary changes to either the ISO or shutter speed to produce a properly exposed photograph. These changes will bemade automatically by the camera in the Auto, Program, Aperture-priority andShutter-priority modes.

There are two ways tocontrol the aperture setting on the camera:

  • Aperture-priority mode (A) - When shooting in Aperture priority mode (A), you set the aperture value and the camera automatically sets the optimum shutter speed for you.
  • Manual mode (M) - When shooting in Manual mode (M), you control both aperture and shutter speed, which gives you maximum creative control to achieve the exact results you want.

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what does "setting aperture" mean?


The "aperture" is the hole inside the lens that controls how much light passes through. The bigger the hole, the more light passes through. Make the hole smaller and less light gets through.

Proper exposure depends on controlling the amount of light getting through the lens to the film or digital sensor. You control it by opening or closing the aperture and setting the shutter to determine how long the light gets through.

Setting the aperture simply means setting the size of this hole to some value.

Jan 08, 2013 | Cameras

1 Answer

What's the aperture in a 3G mobile lens?


The aperture of a lens system is the opening between the actual lens elements, typically made of glass or plastic, and the camera's digital sensor that translates the light into image data. Aperture openings are referred to in terms of stops or f-stops that equate to the ratio of the lens focal length to the diameter of the opening. A lens system with a focal length of 50mm and an aperture opening that is 25mm in diameter would equate to an f-stop of 2, and would be known as a 50mm f2 lens. Some lenses have variable apertures that can be set to one of multiple f-stop values. Reducing the aperture size decreases the amount of light that makes it to the sensor as well as increases the amount of depth of field that the lens will provide.

Oct 24, 2012 | Cell Phones

1 Answer

aperture function


The primary function of the aperture is to control the amount of light passing through the lens. The more light passes through the lens, the less time is required for the proper exposure. A faster exposure can freeze motion and alleviate camera motion, while a longer exposure can allow the subject to blur, conveying a sense of motion.

The aperture also affects the depth of field. A wider aperture narrows the depth of field, causing the foreground and background to blur, while a smaller aperture widens the depth of field, putting more of the scene into focus.

It's up to the photographer to decide which effects to show. Usually for a portrait you'd want the subject's face to be sharp and the background to be blurry. For a landscape, you'd generally want everything from the foreground to the background to be sharp.

May 22, 2012 | Canon PowerShot SX120 IS Digital Camera

1 Answer

The S and M modes on the dial..show black images when taking a pic; any idea why?


I'd say you're severely underexposing. The M mode is for manual exposure. This means you're responsible for setting the appropriate shutter speed and aperture. The aperture controls how much light passes through the lens, the shutter speed controls how long that light hits the sensor. The two of them have to be adjusted properly to suit the amount of light hitting the subject. If the lens doesn't admit enough light and/or the shutter is opened for too short an amount of time, not enough light gets to the sensor and you get a black image.

The S mode is for shutter priority. This lets you set the shutter speed and the camera automatically adjusts the lens aperture for correct exposure. However, the lens has a maximum aperture beyond which it cannot open. If the shutter speed is too fast, again not enough light gets through the lens and you get a black image.

Since you didn't specify the model of your Nikon camera, I can't tell you exactly how to adjust the shutter speed and aperture. If you can't find the procedure in your manual, please feel free to reply to this post, specifying the model.

Feb 24, 2011 | Nikon Cameras

1 Answer

Aperture setting


Inside the lens is an "iris" which allows you to adjust the effective diameter of the lens, and control how bright an image it casts on the film. This is controlled by the aperture ring.

Smaller number settings set a bigger hole in the iris and let more light in - allowing a shorter exposure time, but reducing your depth of field (so if you're focussed on an object at two metres, stuff at 1m or 4m might be blurred)

Larger number settings set a smaller hole and let less light in. This means longer exposures (and more risk of camera shake), but offers a better depth of field (so although you're focussed on something at 2m, objects much closer or further away are also more likely to appear shrp too.

A.

Feb 03, 2008 | Photography

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