Tip & How-To about Cameras

How to improve picture quality of Digital Camera

Slow down the shutter speed of your digital camera. Whenever you must take a photo in a low light environment decrease your shutter speed. It is virtually impossible to take a blurry digital photo with a an extremely slow shutter speed. Even if your digital camera has an automatic or semi-automatic mode, slowing down the shutter speed will still produce a better digital photo.
Wait until your digital camera is completely focused. Most digital cameras will notify you that they are focus ready by a blinking light, on screen indicator or a noise. Confirm that your digital camera has locked onto your desired target before pressing the shutter release button. Some digital cameras may have trouble focusing on subjects easily. If this happens use an auto focus mode to produce a better digital photo.
Prevent your digital camera from shaking. Shaky hands or sudden movement will definitely produce a blurry digital photo. When holding your digital camera, make sure the viewfinder is firmly pressed against your face before snapping a digital photo. If you do not have image stabilization on your digital camera, then think about investing in a tripod. This will allow you to steady your digital camera for the perfect shot.
Make sure the digital image is definitely a blurry one and not just a soft image. On many occasions soft images are mistaken for blurry ones. Soft images occur often with digital cameras. When printing these images, the softness rarely shows through. You will be able to easily edit these photos by sharpening the details for a better printing experience.
Take your time. Instead of rushing to take a digital photo, set aside enough time to shoot your image. Hurrying up will not produce an excellent digital photo. You don't need to be overwhelmingly slow when taking the photo, but try your best not to take a hasty one.

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how to fix slow shutter speed?


When in Any auto mode or P or A your camera automatically will adjust your shutter speed for ambient light conditions. So if your having issues where your camera is choosing to slow a shutter speed and you photos are coming out blurry then there isn't enough light either because other settings in the camera are limiting light or where ever you are taking photos is poorly lit. Setting your ISO Higher should allow the camera to increase the shutter speed, but will often introduce noise to your photos. The more you play with your camera and learn digital photography the more you'll understand how to make your photos the best they possibly can be. For the time being if getting a no blurr shot is key put your camera in S mode which means shutter priority this will allow you to control and lock your shutter speed and set your ISO to auto this will force the ISO and Aperture to change instead of your shutter speed to get a good photo.

Jul 21, 2014 | Panasonic Lumix DMC-FZ30 Digital Camera

1 Answer

Whenever I take photos in shutter priority mode, all the pictures seem to be UNDEREXPOSED not overexposed like most people say it is. It also says LO where the f-stop number should be. PLEASE HELP!


Your shutter speed is too fast. The correct exposure requires a lens aperture larger than physically possible on the lens. That's what the "LO" is telling you. Slow down the shutter speed until the "LO" goes away. Alternatively, increase the ISO sensitivity (or a combination of both).

Just because you can set the shutter speed to whatever you want doesn't mean you can get a properly exposed photo at that shutter speed. There may be too little light (as in your case) or too much light. You have to use a shutter speed appropriate for the subject and the light conditions.

Dec 20, 2010 | Nikon D3100 Digital Camera

1 Answer

pics out of focus


Sounds like "Camera Shake"

With Digital photography, any motion of the camera will tend to blur the photos. You'll see double edges in some photos, and plain fussy pictures in others.

The sharpest photos come from cameras sitting on stationary objects while the picture is taken.

Depending on how advanced your camera is, there are a couple of settings you can toy with.

One is the ISO setting which mimics the "Film Speed" exposure rating of camera film measured in as ISO100, ISO 200, ISO 300, ISO 400.
The Ratings are a balance between Fast action light capture, and slow higher resolution detail light capture.

ISO100 will make a cyclist passing by look like they're standing still.
ISO400 will make a cyclist passing by look like a blur passing by.

ISO100 will have larger dots of colors on the picture, (Low Resolution)
ISO400 will have tiny dots of colors on the picture, (High Resolution)

So, ISO setting is a matter of getting the best picture without the blur; get as close to ISO 100 as you can.

The other setting is Shutter Speed.

Some cameras will allow you to slow the shutter speed down to help get clearer pictures in dark environments, like places with high ceiling lights, or outside after sunset.

Again you want the fastest option available, here the balance is the same as the ISO, bright clear picture versus dark blurry picture, so you want the shortest shutter speed possible.
This is measured in fractions of a second, and often only the denominator (lower half) is mentioned, like this:
1/8 of a second is called 8 or (125 milisecond)
1/4 of a second is called 4 or (250 miliseconds)
1/2 of a second is called 2 or (500 miliseconds)
1 whole second is called 1 or (1 for one second)

On digital cameras it often simply mentioned as the fraction in a menu called shutter speed. The default is often the fastest capable speed.

Browse the menu options for ISO and Shutter speed to see what modifications you can make.

Remember it's about capturing the light, so bright sunny days are easy highest speed settings, but shady or indoor environments will take practice and fine tuning.
Also, make use of the timer delay option and set the camera on a stationary object to capture the clearest sharpest images.

Have Fun.






Jul 28, 2009 | Casio Cameras

1 Answer

On my c-765 slow shutter speed


When operating any digital camera, the camera tries to capture the best focus and exposure for that particular scene. By pressing the shutter button half-way down, the focus and exposure is being set. There will be a green circle on the upper left hand corner of the screen, then your camera is ready to take the picture. Slowly depress the shutter the rest of the way down to take the picture.

May 03, 2009 | Olympus Camedia C-765 Digital Camera

1 Answer

Blurry pictures


There is a well documented problem with the W1 (and its brother, the P100). If you are shooting in good light, you will have no problem. If you are shooting in low light or flash, you will encounter various degrees of blurred photos. Unlike most cameras, the W1 has only two f-stops (f2.8 and f5.2). So the camera must select one or the other (nothing in between). The firmware in the camera will try to select f5.2 as long as it can in low light. This results in a slow shutter speed. And with flash you usually end up with a shutter speed of 1/40th of a second. A slow shutter speed is the cause of the blurred photos. If you can hold the camera perfectly still under low light conditins (and flash) you will get good photos. If you use the cameras manual mode and manually select a faster shutter speed you will get good photos. It appears that Sony could fix the problem with a firmware change so that the camera made better use of the ISO settings along with the f-stop selections. However, they have not done so.

Sep 08, 2005 | Sony Cyber-Shot DSC-W1 Digital Camera

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