Tip & How-To about Dishwashers

Heat your home

From the point of view of energy, electricity is the most expensive to heat your water and your house because it is produced in incredibly inefficient power plants that consume huge quantities of coal or oil. The gas remains the best source of energy for your water and heating, but solar energy offers huge potential in terms of heating water for domestic purposes . If you have no choice, reduce the heat loss through exterior walls by sticking to the walls of aluminum foil, shiny side toward the inside, behind the radiator.

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Is the Whirlpool Electric Water Heater Model # EE3J50RD045V energy star rated


You want to know if this heater has Energy Star label.
I don't know.
Call Whirlpool 1-877-817-6750

Energy Star is a label that means nothing to you.
Manufacturers use energy-star label to promote a product as a money-saver.
They can put an Energy Star label on a giant 10,000 square foot house, and you know that cannot be the truth that a large house saves energy vrs a smaller house.

Energy factor, (energy factor/ not energy star) on the other hand, is a comparison measure how efficient the water heater uses energy to heat a gallon of water, when water heater is absolutely new.
EE3J50RD045V has energy factor of .59, which is completely typical and ordinary for electric water heaters.

The EE3j 50 gallon is an ordinary electric water heater, with ordinary average .59 energy factor rating, so electricity to operate this water heater is same as any other typical 50 gallon electric water heater: it will cost $35-45 a month depending on incoming water temperature, hot water use, thermostatic setting, electricity pricing, and whether you operate heater at peak pricing, etc.
http://waterheatertimer.org/9-ways-to-save-with-water-heater.html
http://waterheatertimer.org/How-much-does-it-cost-to-run-water-heater.html

The most important measure of water heater cost does not have anything to do with Energy-star or energy-factor.
The most important measure is total cost of owning and operating the water heater.
So if you spend $100 more to purchase electric water heater with slightly higher energy factor, then it will not pay you back. The difference will be $2 to $4 per year.
All costs are energy.
The total cost of operating water heater includes purchase price, installation cost, cost of repairs, cost of parts, whether you can fix it yourself, expected life of water heater, and replacement cost.
Every water heater has expected lifespan, and will not have resale value except current price of scrap.

Electric water heaters cost more to operate per month than same-size gas water heater.
Gas water heater might cost less over the life of water heater, but gas water heaters are increasingly expensive to repair, and increasingly more complicated, and cost more up-front to buy.

Electric water heaters cost less to buy, are easy to install yourself, are fully repairable by homeowner using generic off-the-shelf parts, and can be made to last many years by keeping tank clean and replacing anode rod every 2 years.
You can make ordinary 6-year electric water heater from box store last almost indefinitely.
Avoid electric water water heater that has electronic controls.
http://waterheatertimer.org/Clean-sediment-out-of-water-heater.html
http://waterheatertimer.org/Replace-anode-rod.html

Sep 20, 2011 | Water Heaters

3 Answers

How do you reduce an electric bill in a all electric house?


The biggest wasters of electrical energy are Heat and A/c, water heaters,dryers and ranges. The more you insulate the less you have to cool or heat. If you live in a warm climate, consider installing an attic fan that runs on a thermostat or timer. During the summer allow it to run, during winter turn it off. Ceiling fans in rooms that are occupied create the illusion of being cooler, allowing the thermostat to be turned up.I'm not sure of the exact numbers but any thermostat setting on your a/c below 78 is more inefficient so try kicking the a/c up and the heat down. I'm a Florida boy so I can't tell you much about baseboard heaters. I know that anything that heats things up cost a lot in energy.

Consider installing a hot water heater timer. Commonly called a "Little Grey Box". Whenever your water heater is not actually being used it is still heating the water. A big waster. Once installed set the timer to cycle the water heater off during times when you commonly don't use it. Overnight,when your at work etc....

Somewhat antiquated, but a clothesline always uses 100% less energy than a clothes dryer. :) Short of this, try to fill the dryer all the way and make sure your dryer vent and lint trap are clear.

Microwaves draw 1/3 the energy of a range and run for 1/10 of the time. Microwave as many things as you can. In our house we have started microwaving canned veggies and boxed side dishes and such.

These are the big ones I've done at my house. A lot of the other things seemed to be more work than they are worth. Some actually end up costing you more if you don't own the house for decades.

There are many sites you can visit such as your local power company and possibly your local government pages.

Good luck. I'm in the same boat with the high power bill.

Mar 24, 2009 | Fahrenheat F2543 Baseboard Heater

3 Answers

Pool and Spa Heaters pros and cons


An electric heat pump needs heat available to pump. If it is 30 degrees outside, heating a spa to 102 or so, may be impossible unless the heater has some type of alternative heat source. A properly sized, gas fired heater can take care of a larger range of heating needs. A combination heat pump and natural gas heater, probably with a controller, really makes the issue more difficult, expensive, and would require a lot of study for efficient, cost effective operation. Bottom line: In really mild climates a heat pump might do the job. In cooler climates the gas heater rules. And where a wide range of temperatures and high heat demand is wanted by the customer, a gas heater is the only way to go. A backup heat pump may take years to payout.

Aug 27, 2008 | Saunacore Special Edition Residential...

2 Answers

On-Demand Water Heater


An on-demand, or tankless, water heater is a system for heating water as it passes through the pipes, usually very near the point of use. Traditional tank water heaters bring the water to approximately 140 degrees Fahrenheit (60 C), in order to ensure the water supply lasts long after the heater turns off. Since this is obviously far too hot to be pumped out of a shower of faucet, cold water is added to the mix in the pipes. Coupled with the loss of thermal energy over time, the average tank heater has an efficiency of approximately 80%. On-demand water heaters have a number of advantages over their tank-using counterparts. While tanks often degrade over time and begin leaking, the apparatus used in an on-demand water heater is much less susceptible to the burdens of age, and will often outlive the house they're installed in. The amount of energy used is a fraction of that used in a tank water heater, due to increased efficiency and a much smaller window during which a heating source is in use. While tank hot water heaters can, and often do, run out of hot water after a number of showers, on-demand heaters provide a never-ending supply of hot water, ensuring that warm water is always available when needed. A tankless water heater can cost between $500 and $1500, and they most commonly use either electric or natural gas energy to heat the water. Most mid-sized households report an energy savings of approximately 25-45% for a gas or propane heater, and up to 50% with an electric heater, over using traditional tank heaters. Water is usually set to a maximum temperature of 120 degrees Fahrenheit (49 C), though many heaters allow for custom setting of the maximum temperature via remote control. Outflow rates range from 8-14 gallons (30-53 litres) per minute. Installation for most tankless water heaters is incredibly easy, involving simple plumbing. In the case of electric heaters, all that is required for a fuel source is to plug the heater into an outlet and begin heating your water. Some modern on-demand water heaters can incorporate a solar preheating system. This system uses a traditional solar heating system and tank to bring the water nearer to the desired temperature, saving substantial energy use in the final on-demand heating. A solar preheating system costs between $500 and $800.

Aug 27, 2008 | Stiebel Eltron CK20E Electric Tankless...

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