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FAIL-SAFE FILE SERVER AND COMPUTER SYSTEMS If your data is very important, you should consider doing regular data backups because hard disk will fail at some at some stage in the future. This is especially true when you get an error message"hard drive is about to fail". Depending upon how critical your computer or files server to you or your business, you should consider building a fail-safe computer or file server system using RAID technology. RAID means "A Redundant Array of Inexpensive Disks" and there are several levels of RAID. For details of different RAID levels - click on this link - http://searchstorage.techtarget.com/sDefinition/0,,sid5_gci214332,00.html The most common of the fault redundant RAID systems are - RAID 0 + RAID 1 provides fastest data transfer Mirrored hard drives. RAID 5 is one of the most popular system, it data striping across hard drives with error correction. It has excellent performance with fail-safe system and allows for hot swappable hard drives. There should be redundant powers supply inside the computer or file server in the event of a power supply failing. Another consideration is to install a UPS (uninterruptible power supply) to prevent a computer or server shut down from power outages, as this will corrupt your data. These systems do not mean you should not back up your data on a regular basis.

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Will reformatting my hard drive save it the disk from going out?


There isn't any way of fixing a failing hard disk (it is nearly worn out).
You need a new hard disk, but in the mean time backup your data regularly before the hard disk fails completely.

Dec 29, 2012 | Computers & Internet

1 Answer

Here are some of the best practices to take into consideration in any backup & recovery system: Usually perform system state backups of your servers frequently. Each computer on a Windows network has a corresponding computer account in Active Directory. Like a user account, the computer account has an associated password. The difference is that the password is assigned, and periodically changed, by Windows. If you try to restore a system state backup that is too old, the computer account password that is stored in the backup will no longer match the password that is bound to the computer account in Active Directory. As a result, the machine won't be able to participate in the domain. There are workarounds, but it is usually easier to just make frequent system state backups of your servers, & use these backups to recover the servers when needed. Always backup the data, the server's operating system, & the applications installed on the server. Although it is true that, if a server fails and you need to perform a full recovery, you can reinstall the operating system & the applications & then restore any data. However, time is of the essence when trying to recover from a crash. It is much faster to restore everything from backup than it is to manually install an operating system and a set of applications. More important, it is often difficult to manually configure a server so that it matches its previous configuration. Backing up the entire server ensures that its configuration will be exactly as it was before the crash. Periodically test your backups to make sure you are able to use them for recovery when the disaster strikes. Always remember that we perform backups in order to be able to restore from then when we need to. So, we have to make sure our backups are usable. For some applications (for example, Microsoft SQL Server, Microsoft Exchange Server, Lotus Domino Server, ... etc), a file-level backup is insufficient. These applications usually utilize open databases that need a special backup agent to back them up consistently while they are being in-use. Usually make sure that you are using the correct backup agent needed by your application. While you should keep backups off site, consider waiting until the end of the business day to remove the previous night's tapes from the building. This way, if your server fails early during the day, you will not have to wait for hours till you can get the tapes on-site again & start the recovery. Construct your backup architecture in a way that avoids (at least as much as possible) having a single point of failure. If possible, have a backup for your backups, or configure 2 independent backup schedules to run everyday. Do not rely solely on a disk-to-disk backup solution. Although disk-to-disk backup solutions offer many advantages over traditional tape backups, they should not be the only backup solution to rely upon. In such a scenario, the backup server is prone to the same risks as the servers it protects. A hurricane, lightning strike, fire, or flood could wipe out your backup server along with your other servers. For this reason, it is important to dump the contents of your disk based backups to tape on a frequent basis, and then store those tapes in an off-site secure storage. When deciding to replace your current backup technology with a newer one, do not get rid of the old tapes, tape device(s) & backup software. At least, do not do this unless you are sure that your newer tape device(s) support the older tapes, or that you have moved the older backups to newer media supported by the newer tape device(s). This way, when it is required to retrieve data from the old backups, you will be able easily to retrieve the required data. This also could apply to the older backup software if the newer backup application does not support the older tapes or tape device(s). There is no denying that it is important to secure your backups, but it is equally important to consider the consequences of your security measures. If you find yourself having to restore a backup after a major system failure, the last thing you need is an ill-conceived security mechanism standing in the way of the recovery. For example, if you are planning to use hardware-level encryption, do not forget (when time comes to upgrade your backup hardware) to make sure that your new hardware supports the previously used encryption. Always use a long tape rotation scheme, or at least keeping some of your backup tapes as long-term archives.

Jan 05, 2010 | Computers & Internet

2 Answers

SMART Failure Predicted on Hard Disk 0: WDC WD3200BEVT-75ZCT2-(S1) WARNING: Immediately back-up your data and replace your hard disk drive. A failure may be imminent. Press F1 to Continue


just means its time to backup all your information, as if the hard drive does fail theres a good chance you may lose some or all of your information.
hard drives aint that expensive around 30 pounds +
and you can replace it with any sata hard drive.

Jun 17, 2012 | Western Digital Computers & Internet

1 Answer

hard disk failure imm


Hello

The hard drive is a mechanical device that WILL fail - it is only a matter of time. Since you are being prompted that yours is about to fail, you need to get a backup of your data as soon as possible.

Use a USB memory stick, USB hard drive, CD or DVD disk or network drive to copy your data from the hard drive immediately. Once your data is copied to a safe location, you can run CHKDSK /r /f from the CMD line to check the hard drive and possibly fix issues.

If the hard drive has "Bad Sectors", you will need to replace the hard drive.

Dec 15, 2011 | HEWLETT-PACKARD Computers & Internet

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