Tip & How-To about Dehumidifiers

How to repair or fix a Dehumidifier when it leaks or overflows

Nine times out of ten, a problem with a dehumidifier can be traced to electrical parts-not to the compressor. If the problem is being caused by the compressor and the unit is out of warranty (most have a 1-year limited warranty), strongly consider replacing the unit rather than trying to have the compressor repaired. If you're thinking about having the unit repaired, be sure to ask for an estimate.

Unless it is designed to drain automatically, a dehumidifier should be emptied fairly often during hot and muggy or damp weather- sometimes as often as once a day. In humid, damp climates, a dehumidifier's reservoir can pull as much as 50 pints of water from the air a day. Failure to keep the reservoir clean and dry will just contribute to the problems you're trying to solve. If you're in the market for a new dehumidifier, consider its reservoir capacity: Larger capacity reservoirs work more efficiently and have to be emptied less often.
Many dehumidifiers have a float switch that prevents the unit from spilling over with the water that has been drawn out of the air. Sometimes this switch goes bad and must be replaced. If your dehumidifier is overflowing, you can test the overflow prevention switch with a volt-ohm meter.
1) Unplug the dehumidifier and remove the switch.
2) Disconnect the leads and clip the leads to the terminals on the switch.
3) Check the pan or reservoir and empty it if necessary, or make sure the drain isn't clogged.
4) Straighten any kinks or bends in the unit's hose.
5) Set a volt-ohm meter to the RX1 scale (or to K-ω or ω resistance on a digital meter) and depress the bar or trip lever on the switch. If the meter's needle shows no continuity as the switch is clicked back and forth, the switch is probably faulty and will need replacement.

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1 Answer

Unit is in the basement. After 5 years the coils started to freeze up all the time and the compressor still runs


Dirty filter or coils would cause this problem, low charge would as well but clean the coils first. Or stat. setting could be set to low below 72 degrees can cause it to ice up.

Jul 04, 2011 | General Electric AHH40LH Dehumidifier

1 Answer

breaker blows when dehumidifier tries to kick on? Replaced capacitor and no change does this mean the compressor is junk?


One of the major faults with dehumidifiers is damage and electrical ''tracking'' caused by the dampness they are constantly exposed to. Isolate the supply completely ! from the unit then carefully inspect all electrical parts for corrosion and ''blow'' marks. Check motor for shorts to earth as this occurs on old elec motor windings. Also inspect carefully the control contactor / relays that switch motor and fans.

Jul 21, 2010 | Haier Dehumidifiers

1 Answer

I just bought a Danby Dehumidifier model: DDR6009REE The fan runs constantly even when the humidity setting is reached and the compressor is off. has anyone patched the power for the fan by putting it in parallel with the compressor power instead of main power? thanks.


All new generation dehumidifiers are designed to have the fans run all the time and the compressor comes on when the relitive humidity rises above the setting that you have chosen. I spoke with the company and asked them why this is so, and they told me that it is more energy efficient to have the machine on all the time so that when the compressor kicks in there is a small draw on electricity.
Apparently when the old dehumidifiers came on it was the compressor that turned on immediately, and the fan, and this caused a very high current draw. The new design has the fan on all the time and this helps to circulate the air evenly around the area being dehumidified - thus more efficient overall coverage.
I understood their explanation, but still do not like this new method of operation.

Jun 26, 2010 | Danby DDR6009REE Dehumidifier

1 Answer

my dehumidifier is making a power surge every few minutes. why?


A dehumidifier is functionally the same as an air conditioner. It has a compressor motor, which is a fairly high current draw item.

First of all, unless you are well versed in electrical repairs, you should unplug this unit and do not use it. This is a dangerous condition and a fire or electrocution could result.

One of four things is happening:

1) You have a wiring fault in the circuit your humidifier is plugged into. There is a loose connection in the circuit, causing a voltage drop, and the humidifier therefore has to pull much more current to start it's compressor. This is a very dangerous condition, as an electrical fire could result. Try plugging the unit into another circuit and see if it does the same thing.

2) the compressor of the humidifier is going bad and is shorting out internally. Time for a new unit.

3) Many compressor motors use a 'start capacitor' to help the motor get going. If this part has failed, the motor will try to start, but it will not be able to.

4) There is a fault in the power cord or controls of the humidifier. Just like #1 above, a loose connection could cause a voltage drop, making the unit draw high current.

most of these units are standard 110V units. If yours uses 220V (like an electric dryer), then it could have 'lost a phase' which is also a similar electrical issue.

Oct 16, 2009 | Dehumidifiers

1 Answer

Blown Fuse on Compressor of Dehumidifier


That part is a thermal protector. If you can't find it at Radio Shack they should be able to direct you to an appropriate electronics store.

May 19, 2008 | Maytag M3DH30B2A Dehumidifier

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