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Drywall Tip!!!!!!Rrepair ti yourself

If for some reason A hole becomes appearent and a Man or women have to fix it.......... Mud around The hole with a light coat of drywall compound and then put the screem mesh drywall tape in plece.Let it set.Remember to cover the hole diamenter with tape and mud in all edges to be uniform. Let set till dry and white and smoothly apply another coat without leaving streaks of mud. Last coat..........put a little water in a ice-cream tub or something of this nature and add drywall compound to make something to the nature of a pancake batter and feather out the edgesof your best mud job that you ever did, let dry and lightly wash down with sand-paper and get ultiment resaults every time..Prime and paint.

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drywall screws show


Use setting type compound for filling over screws. This compound doesn't shrink and does a better job of covering them up. Light weight compound is fine but is soft. It does shrink as it dries so you'll need maybe 3 or 4 coats to get the dimple area covered. I use setting compounds on all my second coats for this reason. This applies to tapered seams, end or surface joints and corners. You want to tape the drywall with all purpose compound that does shrink so it pulls the tape tight when dry. I use the TapeBuddy taping tools for a tight, no blister seam. Let this dry and second coat with the setting type compound and your finishing project will go much faster.

Mar 13, 2014 | Usg Sheetrock Lightweight All-Purpose...

1 Answer

how do I repair a large hole in my drywalled wall in my living room that is right beside the door frame?


If you live near a Home Depot or Lowes they sell partial sheets of drywall. Cut a square slightly larger than the damaged area from the new drywall. Trace this around the damaged area and then cut out the damaged area with a key hole saw or sawzaw or if you don't have those just your utility knife. You can probably buy all the tools and materials for a lot less than hiring someone. Since you said the hole is next to a door you shouldn't have to worry about electrical wires, but just in case, take a flashlight and look into the hole before you cut to make sure. Now you should have a hole the size and shape of the new piece you cut. The area against the door is against studs and you'll have to just keep cutting with your knife until you get through to the wood. Now, on the other side of the hole across from the door take a piece of scrap wood and put it inside the hole and press it against the inside of the wall so half the scrap wood is behind the wall and the other half is exposed in the hole. While you're holding the scrap wood you'll need to screw 1 1/4" drywall screws through the existing drywall and into the scrap wood. The scrap wood should now be tight against the back of the drywall and partially exposed to resemble the stud on the other side by the door jamb. Now you have backing for your patch. Place the patch you cut earlier in the hole and screw it in place. A screw gun or drill with #2 philips head screw tip will make this job easier. The screws should be counter sunk just slightly so the heads don't rip the paper. If you do rip the paper you'll need to put in another screw near that one or else you'll have problems later, especially near a door. Now finish the hole with joint compound. You can buy this at most hardware stores in a one gallon bucket. You'll need a role of drywall tape as well. I recommend the fiberglass mesh tape for ease. Also you'll need a taping 6" taping knife and a tray.
Fill the joint compound tray half way and mix it around with your knife until smooth. Take the fiberglass tape and stick it to the wall around the patch to cover where you cut. Spread a thick layer of joint compound over the fiberglass tape and then gently wipe it all off with one or two strokes. Repeat this until all the tape is covered with a thin layer of "mud" (joint compound). Make sure all the screw holes get filled too. Let this dry for several hours, maybe overnight. Put the excess mud back in the bucket and clean your tools. When the first coat is dry take your 6" taping knife and scrape away any blobs of mud that you left behind from the first coat and then apply a second coat. You may need a third coat. Sand the joint compound until smooth tapering the edges to the paper. Again, be careful not to sand the paper too much, you don't want to go through. If you have smooth walls, you're in luck, now just paint. If you have textured walls then you have more work. you can get spray texture in an aerosol can at the hardware store. Read the instructions on the can and practice on the left over drywall from your patch. Note: you'll never make a perfect match with this aerosol texture but you can get it close. The only way to get a perfect match is to use a compressor and and special spray gun for joint compound and it takes some practice. You can rent these things in most towns if you're very particular. Good luck

Aug 09, 2013 | Tools & Hardware - Others

1 Answer

How to put tape and putty on drywall


The TapeBuddy drywall taping tool is the answer to your taping problem. A one step drywall tape and joint compound application tool that makes taping easy. It's lightweight, easy to assemble and applies an even amount of joint compound directly to the joint tape. It even applies more compound to the tape center where more compound is needed. Just load with paper or Fibafuse tape and joint compound, pull out the coated tape, cut, apply to the seam and embed. There is no need to pre-mud drywall joints or carry around heavy tools. Taping walls, corners and ceilings is fast with no mess. TapeBuddy is a great DIY tool that will give you professional results. It is easy-to-use and the perfect tool for any drywall taping project.
The tool comes with easy-to-understand How To information on taping drywall. There is a how to manual on their website.

Jun 10, 2013 | Drywall

3 Answers

do i need to apply seem tape over screw holes before applying joint compound?


no this is overkill. the seem tape is only necessary for seems, screw holes can be covered by a coat of joint compound, and sanded smooth after it dries

Jan 15, 2013 | Adhesives, Coatings & Sealants

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