Tip & How-To about Computers & Internet

How to Make Ubuntu Play MP3 Files

Because of licensing issues, Ubuntu is unable to play MP3s out of the box. We’ll show you how to play MP3s and other restricted file formats in about four mouse clicks.
The philosophy behind Ubuntu is that software should be free and accessible to all. Whether MP3 and other file formats are free is unclear in many countries, so Ubuntu does not include software to read these file formats by default.
Fortunately, it does include a package that installs the most commonly used file formats all at once, including a Flash plugin for Firefox.
Note: These instructions are for Ubuntu 10.04. There are small differences for earlier versions of Ubuntu.
Play MP3 Files
Open the Ubuntu Software Center, found in the Applications menu.

Click on View and ensure that All Software is selected.
Type “restricted extras” into the search box at the top-right. Find the Ubuntu restricted extras package and click Install.
Enter your password when prompted.
Once the install is complete, close out of Ubuntu Software Center, and you’ll be able to play MP3 files! To confirm this, we’ll open up Rhythmbox, found in the Sound & Video section of the Applications menu.
Our test MP3 plays with no problems!
Note: If Rhythmbox tells you that MP3 plugins are not installed, close Rhythmbox and reopen it. You should not have to install anything extra through Rhythmbox.

Despite this extra step, playing the most common audio and video file formats – including Flash videos on the internet – is simple. All the software comes installed, you just have to teach them how to read your files.

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1 Answer

MY SANSA WONT SYNC SONGS..


The songs are in the wrong format - they need to be stripped of their DRM license (illegal) or converted to mp3 format.  The best, most legal way to do this is to redownload the songs as an Mp3 file, or re-rip your CD's in Windows Media Player in Mp3 format.
these problems occur because the user is trying to download a song format that the player does not recognize. Every music file is in a certain format. The most common music file formats are Mp3, WMA, AAC (iTunes), WAV, RA, etc.  In addition, every file format type is in a certain bitrate, size, etc.  By far the most common issue is that the music file contains a license or copyright (especially with WMA or AAC file formats).  Each Mp3 player only recognizes a certain number of these formats. Every Mp3 Player is different. You will have to check your Mp3 player’s product specifications (specs) or user’s manual to find out which formats your particular Mp3 player recognizes. When you try to download or sync the wrong file format, you will get one of the errors that I mentioned above.   If you want to know what file type you have, then you must find the location of the individual music file on your computer, right click the title of the song, and select the option “Properties” from the menu.
Mp3 player product documentation is not straightforward.  If a player supports only non-protected WMA files, it will merely say that it supports WMA – it will not tell which type of WMA it supports.  A player that supports DRM-protected WMA’s will usually indicate such on the box (usually with a Windows Plays For Sure logo – which is actually an ironic misnomer).  DRM stands for Digital Rights Management, and it is a type of licensing system for WMA files.  It is used extensively by mp3 player music services such as Bearshare, LeapFrog, Napster, and others.  Not all DRM licenses are created equal – there are licenses with “play rights,” burn rights,” and “transfer rights.”  Play rights mean that you can only play the song on your PC – it will play fine on your computer, but it will not play in your mp3 player even though it appears to transfer.  Burn rights mean that the song can be burned to CD.  Transfer rights mean that the song can be transferred onto an mp3 player that supports DRM-protected files.  Then, there are unlimited licenses and limited licenses.  Limited licenses only allow you to play a song for a certain length of time. You would have to pay extra to continue using the song after that trial period is over – the time length ranges from a few days to several months or longer.

-Tha Mp3 Doctor

Sep 12, 2008 | SanDisk Sansa e260 MP3 Player

2 Answers

Ubuntu Troubleshooting


One of the most common issues people have after getting their codecs installed into Ubuntu, is the sad discovery that Ubuntu won’t play Avi files from inside of your Firefox browser. Well, there is a fairly simple fix for this - lose GStreamer and switch to Xine.

You do this from Synaptic located from System, Administration in Ubuntu. In the search box for the application, just do a query for totem-xine. Once it comes up, select (double click) and then allow the uninstallation of totem-gstreamer. It’s simple!

Aug 05, 2008 | Canonical Ltd. Ubuntu

1 Answer

Re: Unable to play music; license is expired


Re-Rip them, but change the Rip format to Mp3 in Windows Media Player - you will not have any licensing issues with mp3 format

Jul 06, 2008 | Sony Network Walkman NW-A3000 MP3 Player

1 Answer

WMAs and MP3s getting a "not supported format"


Check the files that say "non-supported format" by right-clicking one and going to "properties". Click the "license," "digital rights mgmt," or "media usage rights" tab (wording varies by configuration). See if the license is expired or says, does not support transfer to device. Make sure your music svc sub is up-to-date. If so, convert them all to mp3 format - problem solved. Another poster said that they got same error with 128 kbps bit rate.

May 08, 2008 | Samsung YP-T10 Digital Media Player

1 Answer

Marisell


nwe003f is not a standard mp3 player. It plays mp3 files, but firstly they must be converted to another format (omg). I think that this is not typical conversion- some tags are added and that's why player plays mp3 files and shows the bitrate on screen but those mp3s are not mp3s :)
Download sonic stage and the problem will b solved. Best wishes in 2k8 year :)

Dec 27, 2007 | Sony NW-E507 MP3 Player

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