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How to repatch small sheetrock holes in walls

Well here is a tip that im shure you will enjoy!
How to patch a hole in your wall !
Don,t worry about cutting from stud to stud so you have something to screw too, just cut out a piece of sheetrock alittle larger then your hole ,
Then take your cut sheetrock piece and put it over the hole!
Then take a pencil and trace the cut sheetrock over the hole
Then cut out the hole to the size of the traced piece of sheetrock

OK here comes the fun part: Take 2 larger wooden paint mixing sticks (you can get them at any paint store , sherwin williams,ben moore, home,depot , sears, wallmart,lowes..you get the idea! and there always free so stock up for future holes,

Now take one stick and put it into the hole so that both top and bottom of the stick are equal lengths so that you can put 1 screw countersunk on both ends from the wall side ...what that screw is doing is making a secur backing for you to screw your cut piece of sheetrock to! ...but one is not enough so get that 2nd paint stick out and stick that also behind the wall and screw it from outside at top and bottom ...now your ready to screw that piece of sheetrock to the painsticks ..after thats done just tape and spackle ...once you try this you will always use this technique ,,GUARANTEED!..good luck and happy repairs, glenn

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My 2012 wall air condioner is leaking. How do I fix this and repair the drywall?


It sounds like the drain line is plugged where it goes outdoors, so water is backing up inside the unit until it spills over indoors. Clear the drain line.

You may need to cut a section out of the drywall where it's been damaged, then get a matching piece of new drywall to replace it. If you can cut down the centers of two studs, all the better - then you can screw the new patch directly to the studs on both sides. If not... at least leave yourself a couple of inches of drywall to stitch to - you can do that by screwing small pieces of plywood to the existing drywall, overlapping the hole. Then you can screw the new drywall patch to the plywood.

Next is your adventure in taping & mudding & sanding the drywall to finish the patch. Last, paint it to match the rest of the wall... or repaint all of that wall, including the patch. No need to paint adjacent walls, if your color matching is pretty close.

Jul 26, 2014 | Samsung MH052FNCA 18000 BTU High Wall 410A...

1 Answer

how do I repair a large hole in my drywalled wall in my living room that is right beside the door frame?


If you live near a Home Depot or Lowes they sell partial sheets of drywall. Cut a square slightly larger than the damaged area from the new drywall. Trace this around the damaged area and then cut out the damaged area with a key hole saw or sawzaw or if you don't have those just your utility knife. You can probably buy all the tools and materials for a lot less than hiring someone. Since you said the hole is next to a door you shouldn't have to worry about electrical wires, but just in case, take a flashlight and look into the hole before you cut to make sure. Now you should have a hole the size and shape of the new piece you cut. The area against the door is against studs and you'll have to just keep cutting with your knife until you get through to the wood. Now, on the other side of the hole across from the door take a piece of scrap wood and put it inside the hole and press it against the inside of the wall so half the scrap wood is behind the wall and the other half is exposed in the hole. While you're holding the scrap wood you'll need to screw 1 1/4" drywall screws through the existing drywall and into the scrap wood. The scrap wood should now be tight against the back of the drywall and partially exposed to resemble the stud on the other side by the door jamb. Now you have backing for your patch. Place the patch you cut earlier in the hole and screw it in place. A screw gun or drill with #2 philips head screw tip will make this job easier. The screws should be counter sunk just slightly so the heads don't rip the paper. If you do rip the paper you'll need to put in another screw near that one or else you'll have problems later, especially near a door. Now finish the hole with joint compound. You can buy this at most hardware stores in a one gallon bucket. You'll need a role of drywall tape as well. I recommend the fiberglass mesh tape for ease. Also you'll need a taping 6" taping knife and a tray.
Fill the joint compound tray half way and mix it around with your knife until smooth. Take the fiberglass tape and stick it to the wall around the patch to cover where you cut. Spread a thick layer of joint compound over the fiberglass tape and then gently wipe it all off with one or two strokes. Repeat this until all the tape is covered with a thin layer of "mud" (joint compound). Make sure all the screw holes get filled too. Let this dry for several hours, maybe overnight. Put the excess mud back in the bucket and clean your tools. When the first coat is dry take your 6" taping knife and scrape away any blobs of mud that you left behind from the first coat and then apply a second coat. You may need a third coat. Sand the joint compound until smooth tapering the edges to the paper. Again, be careful not to sand the paper too much, you don't want to go through. If you have smooth walls, you're in luck, now just paint. If you have textured walls then you have more work. you can get spray texture in an aerosol can at the hardware store. Read the instructions on the can and practice on the left over drywall from your patch. Note: you'll never make a perfect match with this aerosol texture but you can get it close. The only way to get a perfect match is to use a compressor and and special spray gun for joint compound and it takes some practice. You can rent these things in most towns if you're very particular. Good luck

Aug 09, 2013 | Tools & Hardware - Others

1 Answer

I need to find out how to mount stereo MA-10D speakers to a wall. I can't see any mounting capabilities on the back, sides, top, or bottom of the speakers. Has anyone successfully mounted speakers like these before?


Hmmm. .U don't have option given for speakers to fix them onto the wall. You have to do the following steps.
Things U need are:
  • Masking Tape
  • Level
  • Pencil
  • Keyhole saw
  • UL Class 2 speaker wire
  • Fish tape
  1. Locate the studs closest to where you'd like to install your speaker. You'll want to install the speakers in between the studs.
  2. Tape the template that comes with the speakers in the center. Check to make sure your configuration is level and plumb. Your template will tell you exactly what size hole to drill to insert the speakers. Trace the opening you need to cut into the wall or ceiling
  3. Cut the hole using a keyhole saw or a drywall saw. Keep the section you cut open in case you can't install the speaker and need to patch the hole you just made. If the hole reveals plumbing, you need to relocate the speaker
  4. Run the speaker wire through the wall, or fish speaker wire from an existing installation.
  5. Install the brackets to support your speaker if one is included with your speakers. Some speakers use clips to secure them to the inside of the wall.
  6. Strip the protective coating from the end of the speaker wire, and insert it into the speaker jacks. Test your speakers now if the wires are attached to an audio source. If not, locate the other end of the speaker wire and hook it up. Testing now will save trouble if you run into problems.
  7. Surround the speaker with insulation to enhance the sound. Secure the speaker into place, and do any necessary patching or painting


Aug 27, 2010 | Roland MA-10D Main / Stereo Speaker

2 Answers

Broken refrigerator drawer support pin


I have a Kenmore 2 door,freezer on bottom, mod# 795.77309600,the shelf that holds the crisper draws cracks,front & back corners, also the back,middle. this is the 2nd time for me. Is there a solution??

Nov 24, 2008 | Refrigerators

1 Answer

Microwave range hood install -- stud in middle of exhaust


You have a few options, First off, I am assuming that the stud you refer to is an outside wall. Assuming that is true, then you have a few options.... one of them is to cut thru the stud and run the vent out. Even if that stud is on a bearing wall ( meaning it is carrying a roof load above it) ... It is unlikely to pose a problem if that one stud has been compromised with it cut out, If that concerns you.. and you are handy, you can open that area of wall up from the inside and box the area that the vent will be located in with short pieces of 2x4 to the studs on either side of it... Another option is to vent the hood up thru the cabinet above and direct that out slightly offset to the stud in the wall..
One thing I have done is to cut the stud out and then to place a piece of 1/2" plywood in the area that the micro/hood will be located and attach that piece with drywall screws to the studs in the wall.. That piece of plywood will help support the stud you cut when you screw it to the adjacent studs and also act as a place to secure the hood mounting bracket on the wall. Granted, it shifts the hood out from the wall 1/2 " but then you have plenty of surface to secure the plate and don't have to worry about hitting a stud or using wall anchors.. I hope you understand my comments..If not...please respond to this and I will provide additional information to clarify this... Hope this helps !

Aug 13, 2008 | Hotpoint RVM1635 Microwave Oven

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