Tip & How-To about Computers & Internet

Basic tips to boost Win XP

Note: These tips contain compiled as well as newly added tricks/tips with my own experiences.
Memory Upgrade: If a PC has less than 512 MB of RAM, add more memory. This is a relatively inexpensive as compared to other upgrades and easy upgrade that can dramatically improve system performance.
To keep the system stable, you need to use the hard drive with the same partition format. This greatly improves the speed as well as the performance of the System.
File Indexing: Disable file indexing. The indexing service extracts information from documents and other files on the hard drive and creates a "searchable keyword index." This process eats up a lot of processor usage. The idea is that the user can search for a word, phrase, or property inside a document, should they have hundreds or thousands of documents and not know the file name of the document they want. Windows XP's built-in search functionality can still perform these kinds of searches without the Indexing service. It just takes longer. The Operating System has to open each file at the time of the request to help find what the user is looking for. Most people never need this feature of search. Those who do are typically in a large corporate environment where thousands of documents are located on at least one server. But if you're a typical system builder, most of your clients are small and medium businesses. And if your clients have no need for this search feature, I recommend disabling it. Here's how: First, double-click the My Computer icon. Next, right-click on the C: Drive, then select Properties. Uncheck "Allow Indexing Service to index this disk for fast file searching." Next, apply changes to "C: subfolders and files," and click OK. If a warning or error message appears (such as "Access is denied"), click the Ignore All button.
UPDATE: Update the PC's Motherboard BIOS, video, motherboard chipset drivers etc..
Prefect/Temporary files: Empty the Windows Prefetch folder every three months or so. Windows XP can "prefetch" portions of data and applications that are used frequently. This makes processes appear to load faster when called upon by the user. That's fine. But over time, the prefetch folder may become overloaded with references to files and applications no longer in use. When that happens, Windows XP is wasting time, and slowing system performance, by pre-loading them. Nothing critical is in this folder, and the entire contents are safe to delete. You can do this directly by typing %temp% in the run and click OK/ hit Enter and delete the files in the temp folder, another method to clean the temporary files including prefetch files is Run - temp - OK and delete the files in the folder.
Unused Files in the System: If you use internet regularly, you need to run a disk cleanup daily or frequently. It's better to use a small apps like Ccleaner or Tuneup Utilities. Or you can do it using the windows utilities as follows: Double-click the My Computer icon. Then right-click on the C: drive and select Properties. Click the Disk Cleanup button -- it's just to the right of the Capacity pie graph -- tick which are applicable and click next, the wizard will automatically delete all the files (unused) selected.
DMA Enabled :In your Device Manager, double-click on the IDE ATA/ATAPI Controllers device, and ensure that DMA is enabled for each drive you have connected to the Primary and Secondary controller. Do this by double-clicking on Primary IDE Channel. Then click the Advanced Settings tab. Ensure the Transfer Mode is set to "DMA if available" for both Device 0 and Device 1. Then repeat this process with the Secondary IDE Channel.
Replace of Cables: If your PC is old and you haven't changed the cables such as IDE/SATA/Power Cables etc. you need to replace them since the electric current flow through these media will slow down and more resistance will hinder the flow. As hard-drive technology improves, the cabling requirements to achieve these performance boosts have become more stringent. Be sure to use 80-wire Ultra-133 cables on all of your IDE devices with the connectors properly assigned to the matching Master/Slave/Motherboard sockets. A single device must be at the end of the cable; connecting a single drive to the middle connector on a ribbon cable will cause signaling problems. With Ultra DMA hard drives, these signaling problems will prevent the drive from performing at its maximum potential. Also, because these cables inherently support "cable select," the location of each drive on the cable is important. For these reasons, the cable is designed so drive positioning is explicitly clear.
Using Updated Antivirus/Antivispyware: Remove all spyware from the computer. Use free programs such as AdAware by Lavasoft or SpyBot Search & Destroy. Once these programs are installed, be sure to check for and download any updates before starting your search. Anything either program finds can be safely removed. Any free software that requires spyware to run will no longer function once the spyware portion has been removed; if your customer really wants the program even though it contains spyware, simply reinstall it.
Uninstalling/Removing Unnecessary Apps: Remove any unnecessary programs and/or items from Windows Startup routine using the MSCONFIG utility. Here's how: First, click Start, click Run, type MSCONFIG, and click OK. Click the StartUp tab, then uncheck any items you don't want to start when Windows starts. Unsure what some items are? Visit the WinTasks Process Library. It contains known system processes, applications, as well as spyware references and explanations. Or quickly identify them by searching for the filenames using Google or another Web search engine.
Remove Unused Programs: Remove any unnecessary or unused programs from the Add/Remove Programs section of the Control Panel.
Disable Visual Effects: Turn off any and all unnecessary visual effects, and disable active desktop. In fact, for optimal performance, turn off all animations. Windows XP offers many different settings in this area. Here's how to do it: First click on the System icon in the Control Panel. Next, click on the Advanced tab. Select the Settings button located under Performance. Feel free to play around with the options offered here, as nothing you can change will alter the reliability of the computer -- only its responsiveness.
Refer to the Microsoft: Visit Microsoft's Windows update site regularly, and download all updates labeled Critical. Download any optional updates at your discretion.
Delete Unused fonts: Make sure the you have fonts fewer than 500 types installed on their computer. The more fonts, the slower the system. While Windows XP handles fonts much more efficiently than did the previous versions of Windows, too many fonts -- that is, anything over 500 -- will noticeably decrease the system performance.
Do not partition the hard drive. Windows XP's NTFS file system runs more efficiently on one large partition. The data is no safer on a separate partition, and a reformat is never necessary to reinstall an operating system. The same excuses people offer for using partitions apply to using a folder instead. For example, instead of putting all your data on the D: drive, put it in a folder called "D drive." You'll achieve the same organizational benefits that a separate partition offers, but without the degradation in system performance. Also, your free space won't be limited by the size of the partition; instead, it will be limited by the size of the entire hard drive. This means you won't need to resize any partitions, ever. That task can be time-consuming and also can result in lost data. I don't recommend this since our systems are not definite when it will crash or corrupted. What i mean is that if your system has only the option to format to re run it and you have only one partition, you'll loss all your data.
Disabling Services: Disable unnecessary services. Windows XP loads a lot of services that your customer most likely does not need. To determine which services you can disable for your client, visit the Black Viper site for Windows XP configurations. I don't recommend this as Microsoft set the necessary services to run them by default as soon as the system starts running. It can cause the unrecoverable problem.
System Maintenance: As per your environment where the systems are operated, you need to do some cleaning and blowing work. I suggest at least once every three months, open the computer's cases and blow out all the dust and debris. While you're in there, check that all the fans are turning properly. Also inspect the motherboard capacitors for bulging or leaks. I do this for quite every 2 months and most of my systems are out performed than others after doing some cleaning.

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3 Answers

change ram from 512 to 1 gig bios cannot read added ram


The original 2 sticks of 256 Mb of RAM gives you a total of 512
Mb of RAM. Two 512 Mb of RAM gives you a total of 1 Gb of RAM.
With two sticks of 512 Mb of RAM are you sure you got a total of 192 Mb of RAM, this is a lot less than the original RAM total of 512 Mb?
Should this be 1920 Mb of RAM?
If this 192 Mb is correct then the RAM modules are either not compatible with the laptop or if the RAM modules are not from the same manufacturer then they may not work together.

Most laptops have video cards that use part of the main RAM for video RAM, that is why the available RAM is less than the installed RAM modules. The amount of RAM the video card grabs depends upon the type of video card and in some cases the amount of video RAM can controlled in the BIOS setting.

Nov 07, 2009 | Sony VAIO PCG-K25 Notebook

1 Answer

I have a Easy Note M5 280DW and would like to know if I can upgrade the RAM?


Standard Memory 256 (256MB x1 Removable) Maximum Memory 1 GB The standard memory of your system is 256 Mbytes and the maximum memory it supports is 1 Gbytes.
So you can either upgrade the RAM by adding 1 stick of 256 Mbytes (for a total of 512 MB) or buy two sticks of 512 Mbytes each (for a total and maximum memory of 1 Gbytes).
You are looking for PC2700 DDR Memory.
In any case, check the memory you have installed.
You can download a free utility like CPUZ that will give your information about your system, including the number of memory slots available and used and the memory (amount and type) installed: http://www.cpuid.com/download/cpuz/cpuz_152_setup.exe

Aug 03, 2009 | Packard Bell Computers & Internet

3 Answers

i want to upgrade my ram what type of ram should i use and how what is the maximum amount of ram i can upgrade to?


Hi,
Memory Upgrade for Sony VAIO PCG-K35 Laptop, the Sony VAIO PCG-K35 Laptop takes the PC2100 DDR SDRAM SODIMMs Memory Type, and comes installed with 512 MB = 256 MB (removable) + 256 MB (removable) of Memory. You can upgrade your Sony VAIO PCG-K35 Laptop to up to a maximum of 1.0 GB Memory, the system has 2 sockets to install Memory, already with 512 MB = 256 MB (removable) + 256 MB (removable) standard Memory installed. For best Laptop performance use the maximum amount of allowed Memory per slot for your Laptop.


Regards

Jun 29, 2009 | Sony VAIO PCG-K35 Notebook

2 Answers

beginning dump of physical memory


Try removing that newly added memory and see if it solves the problem. Might be faulty or incompatible.

Jun 28, 2009 | Compaq Computers & Internet

1 Answer

memory upgrade for Dell Inspirion 4100 notebook


buy 1Gb -one ram, the rices for 512 and 1gb are more or less same now

Apr 21, 2008 | Computers & Internet

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