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How to set Mac OS X 10.6 (Snow Leopard) to run in 64-bit mode

There are two ways to set Mac OS X Snow Leopard to run in 64-bit mode.
The first way is quite simple: you just have to hold down "6" and "4" keys while the system is booting up.
The second way is simple as well. You only have to search for a file named "com.apple.Boot.plist" in /Library/Preferences/SystemConfiguration. Open it with Text Editor and edit line 9: where it reads "", change to "arch=x86_64". Without quotes, of course.
Using the second way, Mac OS X Snow Leopard will boot in 64-bit mode whenever you turn on your computer.
PS: 64-bit mode is available just in some machines like MacBook Pro and Mac Pro. To check if your Mac supports 64-bit mode, write the following command in Terminal, again without quotes: "ioreg -l -p IODeviceTree | grep firmware-abi". You will get the answer "firmware-abi" = <"EFI64"> if your system can run in 64-bit mode or "firmware-abi" = <"EFI32"> if not.

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mac os 9 download


Check the system requirements that need 64-bit, Intel-based Macs currently running Mac OS X 10.6.7 Snow Leopard or higher, with 8GB of free disk space for installation. If need more help for any update Apple and Mac Technical Support .

Jul 31, 2014 | Apple Mac Mini Desktop

2 Answers

Hi, Went to the Mac store to upgrade to Snow Leopard and was told my OS was "way too Old to upgrade to Snow Leopard!" Sorry, I'm a numbskull when it comes to these things. Figured as long as my computer was working then I didn't need to keep upgrading. Now I'm in a pickle. Have Jaguar OS X but must have upgraded along the way since my "about this mac" says I have version 10.4.11 power pc not 10.2. What upgrade do I need to catch up in order to upgrade to Snow Leopard? Thanx!


Apple recommends that if you wish to go from 10.4 to 10.6 then you should purchase the 10.6 Box Set.

System Requirements to run Snow Leopard:
  • Mac computer with an Intel processor
  • 1GB of memory
  • 5GB of available disk space
  • DVD drive for installation
Snow Leopard Installation Instructions:
  1. Just insert the DVD in the optical drive.
  2. Restart your Mac while holding down the C key.
  3. You will be guided through the installation procedure and be prompted at one point to choose which install option you want.
  4. Once the Snow Leopard install is completed the Mac will restart itself.
  5. You will probably be asked to register with Apple upon restart.
  6. Enjoy Snow Leopard on your Mac!
Q: Can I upgrade directly from Mac OS X 10.4 (Tiger)?

A: Yes. Apple recommends purchasing the Mac Boxed Set for this purpose, which will also update iLife (it is unknown at the time of this writing whether older versions of iLife work with Snow Leopard) and iWork. Also note that while it has been said that the $29 upgrade will work with 10.4, it is not officially supported and may be in violation of the licensing terms.

Q: What happened to the different install options? Can't I do an Archive & Install?

A: Apple has revamped the familiar installation options for Mac OS X. You now have two choices, either a straight upgrade or a clean install. Supposedly if you choose to do a straight upgrade, what actually goes on behind the scenes is what was traditionally known as an Archive & Install.

Q: Is there anything I can do to better prepare myself for the upgrade?

A: Yes. It is advisable to run a Verify/Repair Permissions and Verify/Repair Disk in Disk Utility. You may also want to run the maintenance tasks in Onyx. And finally, it would be wise to get your applications up to date using a program like AppFresh.

Feb 16, 2011 | Apple Mac OS X

2 Answers

Need OSX Snow Leopard Driver for Laserjet 1018. Have MacBook Pro 13".


This is the best solution for that problem and works perfectly...
http://blog.ragnarson.com/2010/01/mac-and-hp-laserjet-1018.html

Feb 09, 2010 | Apple MacBook Pro MB991LL/A 13.3-Inch...

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Mac os x Snow Leopard


Apple's next major Mac OS X released, will focus solely on under-the-bonnet changes, the Mac maker has revealed. PowerPC-based machines might be left in the cold?

Apple is promising a version of Mac OS X that "dramatically" reduces the amount of storage space the operating system requires. Undoubtedly, some of that will come from the re-engineered core technologies, but it's hard to conclude that Snow Leopard's release will come not as a "universal" binary capable of running on both Intel and PowerPC processors, but as a single-platform product.

Universality has been handy in ensuring users can run the same installed code on both Intel- and PowerPC-based Macs without resorting to emulation. But just as Leopard lacks the ability to run Mac OS 9 apps - a feature present in previous Mac OS X releases - there will come a time when Apple drops Rosetta, its PowerPC emulation mechanism.

Early rumours concerning Snow Leopard suggested PowerPC support was to be dropped, though that was subsequently denied by Apple.

How can these two claims be reconciled? Only by Apple shipping native-only versions of Snow Leopard. Owners of Intel-based Macs will finally be free of all that redundant PowerPC code in the system software, freeing up space for, as Apple puts it, "their music and photos".

With any luck, Apple will finally allow users to readily remove unwanted languages from their system software, a process that can free up a fair bit of hard drive space too.

Apple won't be ditching support for universal binaries, or PowerPC Macs, because there, for now, too many of them out there. But if Snow Leopard's Grand Central technology does as promised and improves the OS' ability to work with multi-core CPUs, Intel-based Macs are going to shoot even further ahead of old G5 and G4 models.

Apple is also promising that Snow Leopard will offer more pervasive support for 64-bit computing, leading to the ability to support up to 16TB of memory, though the motherboard hardware to do this isn't there yet. In any case, limits to CPU memory controllers mean they don't physically support the full range of 64-bit memory addresses, only a subset.

Snow Leopard will also feature QuickTime X, a "streamlined" revamp of Apple's multimedia foundation, and OpenCL (Open Compute Library), a non-proprietary programming system for running complex code on a machine's graphic chip(s).

Oh, and it'll get Microsoft Exchange support too, in a bid to make Macs more business-friendly.

Aug 27, 2008 | Apple Mac OS X 10.4

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