Tip & How-To about Dryers

Save on drying time and energy consumption!

A dryer is designed to exhaust so many cfm's as it drys through a 4" diameter venting system. The more choked the vent the more heat is backed up into the dryer. This in turn causes the sensors in the dryer to go on and off stopping and starting the heater system in the dyer more frequently then designed. That causes the dryer to take a lot more time and electricity and or gas to dry a load of clothes. Some time 3 or 4 times longer.
Check the flexible dryer vent from the dryer to the wall regularly for kinks and or lint build up.
The major cause of a blocked dryer duct occurs when the water in the clothes is heated to a high temperature and turned into steam, which is then exhausted out the back of the dryer to the outside of the house. As the steam cools on its journey and gets closer to the outside of the house, it tends to get cooler and turns back into water droplets. This is going to be the point where the dried lint, as it escapes past the lint filter, sticks to the newly formed water drops and starts a gradual chocking down of the 4" diameter vent to 3",2",1" and finally stops all flow of air.
Remember, the dryer is designed to exhaust so many cfm's and the more choked the vent the more heat is backed up into the dryer.
It is important to keep the ducting as free from blockages possible. If you are experiencing long drying periods, then it is important to get the lint build up cleaned out.
If you cannot access the dryer ducting, because it is in the wall or ceiling, to look for any obstructions, then look in the yellow pages or contact the local appliance repair service company and get the name of a good duct cleaning company.
Remember to check your venting regularly. A minimum every other year. You will be amazed at how much time and money you will save by doing this simple dryer maintenance.

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1 Answer

Takes 4 or 5 cycles to dry clothes.


Most of the time this problem is attributed to a blocked or more precisely, a partially blocked dryer vent system. When a dryer vent is blocked it stops the air flow and the heat backs up into the dryer turning the heat sensors on and off prematurely taking longer for the clothes to dry. Over time this may cause the heat overload fuse to blow and you will have no heat at all.
First take a look at the dryers ducting between the dryer and the wall to make sure the vent duct (normally a flexible style) has not been crushed or kinked.
If the dryer duct to the wall is in good shape then in most cases there is a blockage some where between the wall where the ducting connects to the vent and where it exhausts outside.
The major cause of a blocked dryer duct occurs when the water in the clothes is heated to a high temperature and turned into steam, which is then exhausted out the back of the dryer to outside. As the steam cools on its journey and gets closer to the outside of the house, it tends to get cooler and turns back into water droplets. This is going to be the point where the dried lint, as it escapes past the lint filter, sticks to the newly formed water drops and starts a gradual chocking down of the 4" diameter vent to 3",2",1" and finally stops all flow of air.
Remember, the dryer is designed to exhaust so many cfm's and the more choked the vent the more heat is backed up into the dryer.
If you cannot access the dryer ducting, because it is in the wall or ceiling, to look for the obstruction, then look in the yellow pages or contact the local appliance repair service company and get the name for a good duct cleaning company.

Apr 08, 2010 | Dryers

2 Answers

the back of my dryer is getting very hot and actually tripped the breaker, also clothes taking forever to dry


Pull the exhaust vent off and check for obstructions, if there's no flow, all the heat is going to build up and also block any lint from escaping out the vent as well.
This can be a fire hazard as well. You may also need to open the dryer and clean out all the lint build up.
When you pull the pull flex hose off the back (the 4"diameter one) check in the back of the machine in the pipe and also in the flex tube. You may have to explore a little in the exhaust line to find the blockage...sounds like this is your issue...
k

Sep 16, 2009 | Dryers

1 Answer

Dryer is not drying. Lint is not collecting on


There is no lint screen that catches ALL the dryer lint. Some lint will always get exhausted through the dryer vent exhaust ducting along with the moisture from your clothing as it dries. If the exhaust vent remains unobstructed, all the air and lint will be blown out the end of the dryer vent exhaust.

However, if the air meets any resistance from kinks, excessive bends, or sags, moisture will build up inside the dryer vent exhaust causing the lint to stick to the interior walls of the vent hose. Over time this lint builds up and forms a clog. With a clog comes condensation and longer dry times. The dryer will continue to run inefficiently and cause the heating circuits to work harder and overheat. This will eventually lead to a failure of the heating circuits. If you are seeing condensation inside the dryer, it is strongly recommended the you inspect and clean the dryer exhaust vent hose. You should repeat this a couple of times a year to ensure it remains obstruction free.

The most frequent causes of dryer vent clogs comes from the following:

1. Ducting that runs in an upward direction in homes that have an attic exhaust. This is a stupid design that gravity will always win. When the dryer shuts offf, anything left in the vent will fall down the ducting to the base of the wall and accumulate. Over time, this forms a clog.

2. Ducting that runs under the home in a crawl space. If not correctly hung from the rafters, the ducting will develop sags causing choke points where lint can accumulate. Leaving it on the ground is not the answer, either. This gives opportunity for rodents to possibly chew through it. This will cause leaks which exhausts warm moist air under your home resulting in mold and mildew.

3. Using plastic dryer vent hose. This type of hose is not recommended because it kinks easily and can get crushed, causing an obstruction where lint can clog. Rodents can also chew through it easily. Pushing the dryer up against the wall and crushing the hose is a common cause. Use the semi-rigid metal type ducting that resists crushing, kinks and rodent infestation.

4. Rodents. Mice love lint. If given the access to it, they will build inside the dryer vent hose which provides a nice warm place to live with lots of bedding material. Make sure you exhaust vent on the exterior of your home is about 12 inches from the ground.

5. Exhaust vent screens. I know there are many types of exhaust vents on the market that you can purchase that have screens on them to prevent birds and rodents from entering them. The screen can actually become and obstruction, though. The smaller the opening, the more resistance the blower fan meets and lint will clog at the end of the exhaust. If you chose to use a protected exhaust vent, the ones with louvers work better. You will still need to periodically check the ensure it does not become clogged.

6. Excessively long vent hose. The rule of thumb when it comes to dryer vent ducting is: The SHORTER and STRAIGHTER the run, the BETTER. Excessively long dryer vent hoses will clog due to the fact that the blower fan is not able to push all the air and lint all the way to the exhaust.

7. Kinked, Excessively Bent, or Crushed vent hoses. If the vent has any choke points due to kinks, bends, or gets crushed behind the dryer, you will develop ponts where the exhaust vent will clog.

The following link may also help in providing some basic guidance on how to install dryer vent hose:

http://www.fixya.com/support/r389357-dryer_ducting_installation_tips

I know it may seem that I'm beating this point to death, but it is important to provide good air flow for your dryer. The number one cause of dryer failures and house fires comes from poorly maintained and poorly installed ventilation ducting.

If you have any questions, please let me know. I hope you find this information helpful.

Sep 07, 2009 | Dryers

1 Answer

Dryer seems to heat-up but clothes do not dry. Substantial humidity inside dryer when opened.


Check your lint filter and the vent . Disconnect the vent hose from the dryer and dry a load . If drys ok , then the problem is between the dryer and where the vent exhausts to .

Aug 26, 2009 | Whirlpool ET8CHEXSQ Dryer

2 Answers

dryer heats up ands pins, but it takes forever to


Hi, First thing to check is the 4" venting to the outside. Make sure it is free of any lint and that there are no kinks in the hose. If this is a gas dryer, the couls on top if the gas valve could be getting over heated and not opening the gas valve later in the cycle so there will be no heat.
Please let me know if this helps you or if I can assist you further.

Thanks
Vic

Jul 15, 2009 | Dryers

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