Tip & How-To about Cameras

Bad pictures on my Digital Camera

A digital camera is a wonderful device - it's just not as good as the human eye yet.
Some things to watch out for:

Spots in the picture - Shiny surfaces reflect your flash back to you.
Picture is dark - Bright Window behind your subject - . Use backlight setting.
Bad focus - Subject is not in the middle of the picture. (Use focus lock if you have it)
Colours don't look right - Sunlight in a building with overhead fluorescents.The camera does not know to use the fluorescent light setting. Set it.
Picture is clear but dark on an overcast day - sport setting is ON or the ISO is too fast. Use auto, 100 or 200.
Flash won't flash and subject comes out dark - light behind subject. Set the flash to 'Always' for this picture.

Do's and Don'ts
Don't drop the camera. USE the hand/neck strap.
Don't store pictures on your memory stick - make copies as soon as you can.
Don't make changes to pictures with your computer while they are on the memory stick. Work with copies on your computer.
Do not allow rain to land on the camera - rain easily runs inside.
If you use rechargable batteries - have two or more sets. Use one set until they are used up, then switch. Charge the low battery only. This maximizes the battery life and provides the longest operating time.
Clean the battery contacts in the camera two or three times a year with 99% pure alcohol and a cotton swab. It does not hurt to clean the ends of rechargeable batteries at the same time. Don't touch batteries on their ends.

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WHY DO I GET RED EYE IN MY PICTURES WITH RED EYE ON


It's becasue of human eye. Eye bottom is red, and when flash fires, camera captures eye bottom
Red eyes function makes pre flash, for pupil to become smaller, but if it is very dark, it is not enought. There is no best solution for eyes not be be red, but shooting techniques can help You or You can try some software after.

Aug 29, 2010 | Canon PowerShot S1 IS Digital Camera

1 Answer

DSC-H7 camera, getting red eye or white eye spots


First, here is why they are red or white spots:

The red is the reflection of your flash on the retinas of your subjects. The white are generally animal eyes reflecting back.

You will notice this on flash shots only and mostly when you use the zoom. The zoom uses a "narrow" field of view so the light that reflects back is "direct", instrad of at an angle.

The fix: Change the ISO setting (it is set too high). It is probably near the maximum sensitivity (3200?)... set it to 400 or so and try that for a while. 800 is probably the best general setting, but try 400 first.

Try not to use the flash unless you really have to, but only if the subject is less than 12 feet away. If no people are in the picture, you may use the flash for subjects greater than 12 feet.

this should work for you...

Sep 11, 2009 | Sony Cyber-shot DSC-H7 Digital Camera

1 Answer

flaw on LCD monitor


This is normal. It may be distracting, but what it is is light. If you notice, it happens when there are bright spots, lights, reflections. These distortions will show up in video so try to avoid aiming at bright things while in video mode. Another type of flicker will happen mostly in florescent light.

Before CCD image sensors, video camera used tubes and aiming them at the sun or bright objects would burn the tubes permanently so cameras have come a long way, but by the nature of cameras being devices that record light, it is hard to eliminate that effect altogether (similar to red eye...just can't be a perfect science due to human nature of having blood vessels in the back of their eyes that when bright light is shined into them, their pupils open and the red color is reflected and shows up as red eye...this is best fixed in a photo editing program. It is hard to totally prevent, but changing angles and not shooting directly head on at subject helps). But I digress...

If it is really distracting for you, here is the one thing I found helpful; recompose the shot slightly by moving yourself, the camera, the angle (doesn't have to be dramatically different, but try to have the sun or light source behind the camera). As you move around, continue to push the shutter halfway down (each time not continuously) to bring subject into focus (getting your green box or boxes that indicate proper focus). Sometimes the lines will disappear if you change your shot even very slightly.

Hope this Helps!

May 31, 2008 | Canon PowerShot A720 IS Digital Camera

1 Answer

White Balance


What is White Balance? The human eye captures white as white, red as red and blue as blue, regardless of whether you are outside under the sun or inside under incandescent lighting. Although this is something that we take for granted, the human eye actually adapts to correct the changes in color under different light sources. In reality, when light sources vary, colors caught as the reflection of those light sources also vary. For instance, films for cameras that use film are designed to capture the most appropriate coloring outside under the sun. Thus when you take pictures under incandescent or fluorescent lighting without using a flash, the colors in the resulting picture may seem strange. Digital camera and digital camcorders are equipped with a handy feature called "White Balance" that corrects the changes in color under different light sources, just like the human eye. One of the white balance settings, "Auto White Balance" (AWB) automatically adjusts to correct the changes in color under different light sources. White Balance and Coloring The White Balance feature on Canon digital cameras and camcorders is set to "Auto White Balance" at the time of purchase. If you prefer different coloring, if you want to adjust the coloring more in detail, or if you want to change the coloring on purpose, we recommend that you change the white balance setting.

Sep 04, 2005 | Canon Optura 500 Mini DV Digital Camcorder

1 Answer

White Balance


What is White Balance? The human eye captures white as white, red as red and blue as blue, regardless of whether you are outside under the sun or inside under incandescent lighting. Although this is something that we take for granted, the human eye actually adapts to correct the changes in color under different light sources. In reality, when light sources vary, colors caught as the reflection of those light sources also vary. For instance, films for cameras that use film are designed to capture the most appropriate coloring outside under the sun. Thus when you take pictures under incandescent or fluorescent lighting without using a flash, the colors in the resulting picture may seem strange. Digital camera and digital camcorders are equipped with a handy feature called "White Balance" that corrects the changes in color under different light sources, just like the human eye. One of the white balance settings, "Auto White Balance" (AWB) automatically adjusts to correct the changes in color under different light sources. White Balance and Coloring The White Balance feature on Canon digital cameras and camcorders is set to "Auto White Balance" at the time of purchase. If you prefer different coloring, if you want to adjust the coloring more in detail, or if you want to change the coloring on purpose, we recommend that you change the white balance setting.

Sep 04, 2005 | Canon GL2 Mini DV Digital Camcorder

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