Tip & How-To about Heating & Cooling

Want to save up to 25% on water heating?

Want to save up to 25 % on water heating? Follow these simple recommendations:

SAVINGS ON HOT WATER HEATING:

1) If you have a tank water heater (electric, gas, or oil-powered), the easiest way to lower your bill is to lower the water temperature. Most usually, a setting of 100-110 F should provide water that is hot enough for pretty much anything. In some water heaters, this corresponds to somewhat below the "MIDDLE" setting.

2) Touch the outside of your water heater tank. If it feels warm, purchase a "water heater blanket" for around $10-$20. It goes around the water heater to help keep the heat inside. Be sure you DO NOT cover the very top vent of the heater (if you have a gas-powered one).

3) If your water tank is more than 15-20 years old and it needs to be replaced, buy one that has at least a 12 year guarantee. In a recent article, Consumer Reports cut open several different brands of water heaters. The ones with a guarantee of 12 or more years had almost TWICE the amount of insulation that the ones that only had a 5 or 9 year guarantee. Also, be sure to get one that has a high efficiency, even if they cost a bit more. You'll save money in the long run.

4) Install a "low flow" showerhead (2.5 gallons per minute or less). You can buy them for as low as $10-20. With a 2.5 gpm showerhead, a 15 min. long shower will only use 37.5 gallons of hot water. Some "ultra low flow" showerheads deliver 1.6 gpm, saving even more.

5) Do not take baths in your bathtub too often. Although bathtubs vary in size, they are usually around 50 gallons, so filling up your bathtub will use 33% more hot water

6) At least once a year, drain the water from your water heater to get rid of any hard water deposits or any solids that may develop inside the tank. To do this, turn off the circuit breaker of the water heater (if you have an electric one) or turn the gas off (if you have a gas one). Wait at least 30 min. to let it cool down a bit. Close the cold water intake to the tank (there should be 2 pipes on top of the tank; the coldest one is the cold water intake). Locate the drain valve, usually on the BOTTOM of the tank. Place a bucket under it and open the valve (BE CAREFUL; VERY HOT WATER WILL COME OUT). Drain all the water. Close the drain valve. Open the cold water valve and allow the tank to fill up all the way (this may take a while). After the tank is full, open the gas valve (if you have a gas water heater) and light up the pilot or turn the circuit breaker on (if you have an electric one).

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1 Answer

new tankless bosch unit, luke warm h20, gas line 1 inch direct to tankless, gas company came and gas psi ok. Plumber said we can not adjust the gas pressure above 5.5 inches of water at the meter. hel


1) Add tempering tank to preheat incoming cold water.
http://waterheatertimer.org/Tempering-tank.html

2) Read product manual or call Bosch to make sure unit works with pre-heated incoming water. Some incoming water sensors will not trigger combustion is incoming water exceeds certain limit.

2a) Read product manual for required yearly/monthy maintenance.
Train wife to delime tankless yearly.

3) Install bigger gas meter.

4) Solve entire moneypit problem today for $325
http://waterheatertimer.org/How-to-install-gas-water-heater.html

5) Don't install tankless unless you have a lot of money and time for headaches.
Don't believe promotional literature. Tankless promotion is BS for average do-it-yourself folks who want to save a buck on water heating. Estimated yearly saving of $100 means Tankless do not save money long term. All costs are energy: Purchase price and installation negates several years saving up front. One repair will negate another 5-8 years energy savings. By then you need new unit.

Feb 03, 2013 | Water Heaters

1 Answer

I have an AE125 - had it for a couple of years at the cottage. We got the water hooked up this spring and all was fine. Last weekend, the unit stopped working. I flipped the breakers a couple of times and also drained it and tried again - no luck We draw water from the river and filter it as best we can - but it was a bit dirty this sprint. If that's the problem, can it be cleaned? Thanks, Doug Thompson


Can tankless electric water heater be repaired? Sure.
Is it worth the expense if problem is going to happen again? I can't answer, but can offer resources.

New tank-type electric water heater costs $207 and new tank-type gas costs $320 at local box store.
You can install new tank-type electric yourself in a couple hours. DIY repair on tankless is not easy since parts are not at local box store, and what part do you need, and tankless parts can easily cost more than new tank-type water heater.

Open following link for Bosch troubleshooting resources.
http://waterheatertimer.org/Troubleshoot-Bosch-Tankless-water-heater.html

GENERALLY, Tankless require .4 gpm (gallons per minute) water flow to activate heating cycle, and then require .25 gmp flow to keep heating cycle going.
For example .4 gallon per minute means faucet can fill 1 gallon container in 2-1/2 minutes
Some tankless units require more water flow, for example .75 gpm

Tankless water heaters have flow sensor that tells computer chip when enough water is flowing to activate heating cycle.
If the sensor is clogged, or if water filter inside tankless unit become clogged with dirt or sediment from hard water, then the unit does not signal enough water flow and will not activate.
Home filtration system and water softener can also slow the flow of water.
Low water pressure and crossover problem on single-handled faucet and crossover on recirculation system check valve and high thermostat setting can also cause heat cycle to not activate.

Tankless cannot be exposed to water with more than 11 grains hardness or parts inside tankless will coat with sediment and not work. Within 2 years the unit will not work, with diminished efficiency from the beginning.
http://waterheatertimer.org/Battelle_Final_Report.pdf

If water is hard, and you cannot soften the water, or if water is dirty and cannot be cleaned, then the best recommendation is to use tank-type heater instead of tankless.

All costs are energy. For average home: Tankless electric is NOT cheaper to operate than tank-type electric. Tankless gas saves $1-8 per month. However, cost of unit and installation, cost of potential repairs and cost of parts, difficulty of DIY repairs, required yearly-monthly maintenance, etc outweigh expected savings.
http://www.pmengineer.com/Articles/Cover_Story/8cf9e86f7c298010VgnVCM100000f932a8c0____

Upvote the help.
And take advantage of fixya expert assistance live.
For a price, expert works with you while you work on water heater or any do-it-yourself project.
Fixya is always less expensive than a service call.

May 31, 2011 | Bosch AE125 PowerStar 4 GPM Indoor...

1 Answer

Central heating and hot water have suddenly stopped working


not an engineer but maybe a heating compant,, it sounds like you have a relay that has gone bad, you have what we call a winter summer system your domestic water comes from a tank inside the boiler, you might want to think about splitting the system to save you some money in the long run, seperate the water heater from the boiler so you only heat up in the winter, right now you are heating the system that heats your house to get 30 or 40 gals of domestic hot water, it would cost you less by seperating them

May 17, 2009 | Water Heaters

1 Answer

Hot water lasts half the time


How old is the heater?

It may be something as simple as just needing to flush the tank to remove any sedemints....and hopefully so because this is the easiest/cheapest thing to do.

If this is not the case go ahead and remove the heating elements and check for wear. Replace them if necessary. I would also replace the thermostats that accompany each of the elements.


Checking and replacing both of this requires you to drain the tank completely and should be close to $25 total....last time I checked.

Apr 27, 2009 | General Electric Water Heaters

2 Answers

On-Demand Water Heater


An on-demand, or tankless, water heater is a system for heating water as it passes through the pipes, usually very near the point of use. Traditional tank water heaters bring the water to approximately 140 degrees Fahrenheit (60 C), in order to ensure the water supply lasts long after the heater turns off. Since this is obviously far too hot to be pumped out of a shower of faucet, cold water is added to the mix in the pipes. Coupled with the loss of thermal energy over time, the average tank heater has an efficiency of approximately 80%. On-demand water heaters have a number of advantages over their tank-using counterparts. While tanks often degrade over time and begin leaking, the apparatus used in an on-demand water heater is much less susceptible to the burdens of age, and will often outlive the house they're installed in. The amount of energy used is a fraction of that used in a tank water heater, due to increased efficiency and a much smaller window during which a heating source is in use. While tank hot water heaters can, and often do, run out of hot water after a number of showers, on-demand heaters provide a never-ending supply of hot water, ensuring that warm water is always available when needed. A tankless water heater can cost between $500 and $1500, and they most commonly use either electric or natural gas energy to heat the water. Most mid-sized households report an energy savings of approximately 25-45% for a gas or propane heater, and up to 50% with an electric heater, over using traditional tank heaters. Water is usually set to a maximum temperature of 120 degrees Fahrenheit (49 C), though many heaters allow for custom setting of the maximum temperature via remote control. Outflow rates range from 8-14 gallons (30-53 litres) per minute. Installation for most tankless water heaters is incredibly easy, involving simple plumbing. In the case of electric heaters, all that is required for a fuel source is to plug the heater into an outlet and begin heating your water. Some modern on-demand water heaters can incorporate a solar preheating system. This system uses a traditional solar heating system and tank to bring the water nearer to the desired temperature, saving substantial energy use in the final on-demand heating. A solar preheating system costs between $500 and $800.

Aug 27, 2008 | Stiebel Eltron CK20E Electric Tankless...

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