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10 reasons why PCs crash-You must know tip 3

3 BIOS settings

Every motherboard is supplied with a range of chipset settings that are decided in the factory. A common way to access these settings is to press the F2 or delete button during the first few seconds of a boot-up.

Once inside the BIOS, great care should be taken. It is a good idea to write down on a piece of paper all the settings that appear on the screen. That way, if you change something and the computer becomes more unstable, you will know what settings to revert to.

A common BIOS error concerns the CAS latency. This refers to the Ram. Older EDO (extended data out) Ram has a CAS latency of 3. Newer SDRam has a CAS latency of 2. Setting the wrong figure can cause the Ram to lock up and freeze the computer's display.

Mcft Windows is better at allocating IRQ numbers than any BIOS. If possible set the IRQ numbers to Auto in the BIOS. This will allow Windows to allocate the IRQ numbers (make sure the BIOS setting for Plug and Play OS is switched to 'yes' to allow Windows to do this.).

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Dell Inspiron 530. At start up gives CMOS checksum error defaults loaded. Options press F1, F2 or F12 computer does not react. Has new CMOS battery. RAM OK. Did CMOS clear and password reset. What else can I do to get in setup ?


When a Power Supply is plugged into power, there is a constant 5 Volts present. The 5 Volt Standby Power.

You press the Power On button.
This in turn presses against the Power On switch, located inside it's plastic assembly.

The Power On switch is a Momentary Contact Switch.
Temporary closing it activates the Soft Power On circuit.
A 5 Volt circuit that utilizes the 5 Volt Standby Power.

The Soft Power On circuit 'excites' the Power Supply, and turns it on.
(Sounds like a seedy novel)

The first chipset (Integrated Circuit) to receive power is the BIOS chipset.
The Basic Input/Output System program is initialized.

BIOS looks to see what devices are connected, does a Ram Memory count, turns the Processor on, and hands the computer over to the Operating System.

A checksum is computed as an error-detecting code, to protect the BIOS settings stored in CMOS.
Each time the computer is turned on, this number is re-computed; and checked against stored values.

If they do not match an error message is generated, to tell you the CMOS memory contents may have been corrupted; and therefore some settings may be wrong.
Your BIOS assumed the settings were incorrect, and loaded BIOS default settings; stored in BIOS.

(Default = factory settings)

CMOS Checksum Error Defaults - Loaded

New battery? Nope didn't help.
Clear CMOS, and password reset? Nope didn't help.

Leaves Virus as the problem, or hardware component/s on motherboard; are bad.

My thoughts?
Bad motherboard.

("BAD motherboard. NO,...........you know you have been bad,....don't give me that look. You're a bad motherboard."

Lol!)

That's my diagnosis.


(Unless you put the CMOS battery in upside down.
+ goes UP)

Regards,
joecoolvette

Mar 17, 2013 | Dell Computers & Internet

3 Answers

VGC-RB42G flashig power light and won't power


I have had this problem if power is removed by disconnecting the power cord (in cases where nothing else works). To fix the problem:
1) remove the power cord from the back of the unit
2) disconnect the large power connector from the power supply to the motherboard
3) apply power to the power supply
4) reconnect the motherboard power connector
5) turn the unit on
- dedndave

Apr 13, 2010 | Sony VAIO VGC-RB42G PC Desktop

2 Answers

START UP PROBLEM


You need to reset bios.
Open cpu cabinet and pull cmos cell from motherbord chipset for 15 minutes then all settings are factory defaults.
Aslo you can reset settings with jumper settings .
Refix your RAM memory. Refix processor.
Reattch ATX power supply to motherbord.
Thanks for using fixya.
Please rate solution if it helps.

Jul 20, 2009 | Asrock ALiveNF6G-VSTA (MB-ALVNF6G)...

1 Answer

rebbot to factory settings


Hi bgreenejr,

Are you referring to the BIOS or OS?

If you’re referring to the BIOS settings, you can do this by accessing it and selecting "set to factory default" from the menu. The most common way to access it is by pressing the DEL button upon boot up; there are however, a lot of branded PC and laptops may use a different button like F2 or F12, etc; if you’re BIOS is locked, of course you’ll need the password to log-in.

Another and common method of resetting it to factory default is by shorting the CMOS reset jumper located in your motherboard, usually it’s the closest jumper to the battery or the CMOS chip. This does not require any password, actually this is the method used if you forget your BIOS password. I would suggest that you consult your motherboard or computer’s documentation on how to locate the CMOS reset jumper on it.

If you are referring you your operating system, the only sure way to reset it to default settings is if you do a clean install, that means re-formatting your pc and re-doing everything again, kinda messy, unless you can do a system restore that would revert it back to the original date and time when you first install the system, . Hope this helps

Cheers and best regards,

May 06, 2008 | Computers & Internet

1 Answer

cannot see 4 gb ram


Hi Ciccio8670,

If you are running 32-bit Windows, you must live with it. You will not ever see all 4GB of RAM you've paid for.
If you are running 64-bit Windows, you may have to live with it. Depending on your motherboard's chipset, your system may support memory remapping. If so, you will be able to use all 4GB of RAM.

Detailed:
Due to an architectural decision made long ago, if you have 4GB of physical RAM installed, Windows is only able to report a portion of the physical 4GB of RAM (ranges from ~2.75GB to 3.5GB depending on the devices installed, motherboard's chipset & BIOS). This behavior is due to "memory mapped IO reservations". Those reservations overlay the physical address space and mask out those physical addresses so that they cannot be used for working memory. This is independent of the OS running on the machine. Significant chunks of address space below 4GB (the highest address accessible via 32-bit) get reserved for use by system hardware: • BIOS – including ACPI and legacy video support • PCI bus including bridges etc. • PCI Express support will reserve at least 256MB, up to 768MB depending on graphics card installed memory
What this means is a typical system may see between ~256MB and 1GB of address space below 4GB reserved for hardware use that the OS cannot access. Intel chipset specs are pretty good at explaining what address ranges gets reserved by default and in some cases call out that 1.5GB is always reserved and thus inaccessible to Windows.

Feb 13, 2008 | ASUS P4P800 SE (890552603657) Motherboard

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