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Slow System Performance Due to Failing Hard Drive

Hard drives will often start making errors before they fail completely. In WINXP, the system will recognize drive errors and will throttle back the speed of the drive interface to try to improve things. Unfortunately, this makes the system really slow and fakes the effects of a virus/trojan. If you can't find any malware and your system is a slug, check in the hard drive properties and check until you find the hard drive interface mode. If it says PIO instead of DMA, then something is wrong. You can change it back, but if the drive creates more errors it will just switch to the slow setting without telling you. Clone your drive ASAP! I used xxclone which is free.

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externel harddrive will not open on computer and keeps making a beeping noise


If your USB drive is not being recognized by your computer when you plug it in

try unplugging it, and also unplugging any other USB devices that are connected.


All USB devices, even those that have an external power supply, draw a portion of their power directly from the USB bus.


If you have too many devices connected to the same USB controller, problems such as a drive not being recognized can result.

Incompatible File System

The Mac-operating system can read drives formatted under the FAT32 and NTFS file systems used by Windows, but Windows will not recognize HFS, the file system used by Mac OS.

If you connect an HFS-formatted external drive to a computer running Windows, the drive will spin up but Windows will not respond.

The drive will have to be used with a Mac, or reformatted using a disk-partitioning utility.


Drive Disconnected from Power

Some external hard drives have the option of drawing all their power from the USB bus, or receiving supplemental power from a wall outlet.


If your drive will not operate using power from the USB bus only, connect the power supply. Many drives do not have this option; they will not operate unless they are connected to both a power outlet and a USB port.


Driver Update Required

Some older motherboards may require updated USB drivers to properly utilize a modern USB 2.0 device.


If you have exhausted all the basic troubleshooting steps above, visit the website of your motherboard's manufacturer and look for updated USB drivers.


Also, ensure that your Windows installation is fully up to date.

Corrupted Files

USB hard drives are susceptible to data corruption if either the power or USB cables are disconnected during a write operation.

Over time, this could lead to a situation in which Windows will be unable to write to the drive correctly.

To have Windows attempt to fix corrupted files, run Scandisk by right-clicking on the drive after double-clicking on "My Computer." Click Properties > Tools > Error Checking. Click the two check boxes to have Windows attempt to fix errors and bad sectors.


Click "OK" to start the operation.

Depending on the size of your hard drive and the speed of your computer, this operation can take a few hours to complete.

Failing Hardware

If your drive is still not being recognized, but it is making audible noises when it is plugged in, the drive may be failing.


Nearly every hard drive manufacturer distributes a free utility to check the drives that they make for errors.

Visit the manufacturer's website to download this utility.


If the drive is failing, the utility will most likely be able to detect it.

Contact the manufacturer for a replacement if the drive is under warranty.



Oct 01, 2012 | Toshiba Canvio 500 GB USB 20 Portable...

1 Answer

See message please.


Hi,

If your PC is not acknowledging the device nor allowing you to install a driver the most likely cause is a failed circuit board in the enclosure with the next most likely be a failed hard drive inside the enclosure.

Take the drive to a local computer store and swap the hard drive into a new enclosure. If this works your done, if not the drive is likely damaged and you will need the help of a data recovery pro.

Either way comment back here and if needed I will point you to an appropriate pro.


Chris

May 25, 2009 | Maxtor Personal Storage 3200 (U01E200) 200...

1 Answer

WinXP Won't boot after installing a second hard drive


I'm guessing maybe the IDE cables aren't connected properly, or the jumpers need to be set for cable select. Are you sure you configured the jumpers correctly for the master/slave setting for that particular drive?
Then again, when you enter the bios setup at boot does it recognize the second drive, but xp fails to boot, or is the bios also failing to recognize the 2nd drive? If that's the case, and the bios is set correctly, your drive may be at fault.
Check your bios setup,
If all that's in order, all I can offer is a couple links that might help you to sort it out.
http://www.pcmech.com/article/installing-a-hard-drive-step-by-step/
http://www.helpwithpcs.com/upgrading/install-hard-drive.htm
regarding partitioning, http://www.theeldergeek.com/hard_drives_09.htm
And here's a link to a bios primer, that may shed some light on your situation.
http://www.pcguide.com/ref/hdd/bios/index.htm
I hope this steers you in the right direction. Let me know if you get it sorted out...

Mar 20, 2009 | Symantec Norton Partition Magic-8.0...

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