Tip & How-To about Watches

Watch glossary: E

EBAUCHE
Incomplete (jeweled or non-jeweled) watch movement without regulating organs, mainspring, dial and hands.
ECO-DRIVE
A name for a patented power mechanism found on some Citizen watches. This mechanism uses ordinary light to keep a rechargeable battery powered for watch operation. This technology is very sophisticated allowing some watch models to remain powered for up to 5 years in the dark. Watches with Eco-Drive technology will never need to have the battery replaced.
ELAPSED TIME ROTATING BEZEL
A graduated rotating bezel used to keep track of elapsed time. The bezel can be turned so the wearer can align the zero on the bezel with the watch's seconds or minutes hand. After a period of time passes, you can read the elapsed time off the bezel. This saves you having to perform the subtraction that would be necessary if you used the watch's regular dial.
ELECTROPLATING PROCESS
Process of covering metal articles with a film of other metals. The article is immersed in a chemical solution; electric current (D.C.) flows through the solution from a piece of metal (anode) to the article (cathode), depositing metal thereon by electrolysis.
ENDSTONE
Undrilled jewel, placed on the balance jewel with the tip of the balance-staff pivot resting against its flat surface, to reduce pivot friction. Sometimes used also for pallet staffs and escape wheels.
ENGINE-TURNED, see guilloché.
EQUATION OF TIME
Indication of the difference, expressed in minutes, between conventional mean time and real solar time. This difference varies from -16 to +16 seconds between one day and the other.
EQUINOX
The time when day and night are of equal length, when the sun is on the plane of the equator. Such times occur twice in a year: the vernal equinox on March 21st-22nd and the autumnal equinox on September 22nd-23rd.
ESCAPEMENT
Positioned between the train and the balance wheel and governing the rotation speed of the wheel - train wheels. In today's horology the most widespread escapement type is the lever escapement. In the past, numerous types of escapements were realized, such as: verge, cylinder, pin-pallet, detent and duplex escapements. Recently, George Daniels developed a so-called "coaxial" escapement.
ESCAPE WHEEL
A wheel belonging to the mechanism called escapement

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Citizen Eco Drive


The Citizen Eco Drive watches use special recharchable batteries.
I started collecting a couple of watches and I noticed sometimes a jeweler replaces them with an ordinary battery. The watch will work and at the same time it will try to recharge this one until it explodes! In newer models they made it harder to use the non-rechargable ones by adding a special connector or clip to the rechargable battery types.
Okay,you stored your watch in a drawer as many people do? It may have lost the charge over time. First thing to try is to leave it on the window sill so the dial is in the sun. It will start ticking, but please leave it out there for 3 days to a week. The seconds hand will tick irregularly in steps of one and two seconds, to show you it wants you to readjust the time, as it knows it has lost time. Adjust the time and it should run smoothly.
The seconds hand should run in single second steps, if it takes steps regularly, but every 3 seconds or so, it tries to tell you that its power level is going down. It will be able to continue for one or two days, but you should get it into the sun more often.
Charging the battery under a lamp is possible, however this heats up the watch and this may reduce battery life.
If you need to know more about the Eco Drive, look for detail tech manuals for all types here: http://www.citizenwatch.com/downloads/tech/tech.htm
Those are great watches as long as you remember it needs light to charge. Be sure to ask the watch repair man if he knows the eco drive uses special battery, if not sure, find another watch repair man before he kills your watch ;)

Jun 13, 2009 | Citizen Eco-Drive BL006056H Wrist Watch

1 Answer

Citizen Eco Drive watch


The Citizen Eco Drive watches use special recharchable batteries.
I started collecting a couple of watches and I noticed sometimes a jeweler replaces them with an ordinary battery. The watch will work and at the same time it will try to recharge this one until it explodes! In newer models they made it harder to use the non-rechargable ones by adding a special connector or clip to the rechargable battery types.
Okay, if you say your battery goes bad, did you store your watch in a drawer as many people do? It may have lost the charge over time. First thing to try is to leave it on the window sill so the dial is in the sun. It will start ticking, but please leave it out there for 3 days to a week. The seconds hand will tick irregularly in steps of one and two seconds, to show you it wants you to readjust the time, as it knows it has lost time. Adjust the time and it should run smoothly.
The seconds hand should run in single second steps, if it takes steps regularly, but every 3 seconds or so, it tries to tell you that its power level is going down. It will be able to continue for one or two days, but you should get it into the sun more often.
Charging the battery under a lamp is possible, however this heats up the watch and this may reduce battery life.
If you need to know more about the Eco Drive, look for detail tech manuals for all types here: http://www.citizenwatch.com/downloads/tech/tech.htm
Those are great watches as long as you remember it needs light to charge.

Mar 05, 2009 | Citizen Skyhawk Eco-Drive JR306059F Wrist...

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