Tip & How-To about Watches

Watch glossary: A

ACRYLIC CRYSTAL
The inexpensive plastic crystal. It's not very hard and shallow scratches can be buffed out.
ALARM WATCH
A watch provided with a movement capable of releasing an acoustic sound at the time set. A second crown is dedicated to the winding, setting and release of the striking-work; an additional center hand indicates the time set. The section of the movement dedicated to the alarm device is made up by a series of wheels linked with the barrel, an escapement and a hammer striking a gong or bell. Works much like a normal alarm clock.
AMPLITUDE
Maximum angle by which a balance or pendulum wings from its rest position.
ANALOG or ANALOGUE
A watch displaying time indications by means of hands.
ANALOG QUARTZ
The most commonly-used term in referring to any analog timepiece that operates on a battery or on solar power and is regulated by a quartz crystal
ANNUAL CALENDAR, see calendar, annual
ANTIMAGNETIC
Said of a watch whose movement is not influenced by electromagnetic fields that could cause two or more windings of the balance-spring to stick to each other, consequently accelerating the rate of the watch. This effect is obtained by adopting metal alloys (e.g. Nivarox) resisting magnetization.
ANTIREFLECTION, ANTIREFLECTIVE
Superficial glass treatment assuring the dispersion of reflected light. Better results are obtained if both sides are treated, but in order to avoid scratches on the upper layer, the treatment of the inner surface is preferred.
ARBOR
Bearing element of a gear (s.) or balance, whose ends-called pivots - run in jewel holes or brass bushings.
ATMOSPHERE (ATM)
Unit of pressure used in watch making to indicate water-resistance
ATOMIC TIME STANDARD
Provided by the U.S. National Institute of Standards and Technology, Time and Frequency Division, Boulder, Colorado, atomic time is measured through vibrations of atoms in a metal isotope that resembles mercury. The result is extremely accurate time that can be measured on instruments. Radio waves transmit this exact time throughout North America and some "atomic" watches can receive them and correct to the exact time.
AUTOMATIC
A watch whose mechanical movement is wound automatically. A rotor makes short oscillations due to the movements of the wrist. Through a series of gears, oscillations transmit motion to the barrel, thus winding the mainspring progressively.
AUTOMATIC WINDING
A rotating weight, set into motion by moving the wrist, winds the going barrel via the gear train of a mechanical watch movement. Automatic winding was invented during the pocket watch era in 1770 by Abraham-louis Perrelet, who created a watch with a weight swinging to and fro (when carried in a vest pocket, a pocket watch usually makes vertical movements). The first automatic winding wristwatches, invented by John Harwood in the 1920s, utilized so-called hammer winding, whereby a weight swung in an arc between two banking pins. The breakthrough automatic winding movement via rotor began with the ball bearing Eterna-Matic in the late 1940s, and the workings of such a watch haven't changed fundamentally since. Today we speak of unidirectional winding and bi-directionally winding rotors, depending on the type of gear train used.
AUTOMATON
Figures, placed on the dial or case of watches, provided with parts of the body or other elements moving at the same time as the sonnerie strikes. The moving parts are linked, through an aperture on the dial or caseback, with the sonnerie hammers striking a gong.

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1 Answer

2105(3). does this watch have an acrylic crystal or mineral glass?


sorry but possibly only a jewelery shop could tell you .

Feb 14, 2016 | Crystal Watches

1 Answer

Watch lens scratches... Solutions to repairing?


If you have a plastic crystal, you can use plastic polish (I like Novus #2, myself) to buff out small scratches. In a pinch, white toothpaste (not the gel kind) contains gentle grit and also will buff out some imperfections in a plastic watch crystal. Toothpaste is harsher than plastic polish, however, and may remove deeper scratches at the cost of creating some additional fine scratches.
If your watch crystal is made of mineral glass, scratches cannot be easily polished out. In that case, your best solution would be to take it to a jeweler or watch repair facility to have the crystal replaced. Depending on the style of the watch, replacing a crystal can be as little as $15--or run to well over $100 for some diver's watches. If you're not comfortable with the estimate, get another one elsewhere. Crystal replacement is a high profit margin job for many jewelers. Not everyone is equally greedy.

May 09, 2011 | Akribos XXIV Saturnos Skeleton Automatic...

1 Answer

I have a Police Phalanx watch, black and rose gold effect. The glass has a couple of scratches and one of the rose gold markers has come away at the 10 o'clock position. Would it be expensive to repair ? Best regards. Bill


If the crystal of your watch is made of plastic, it may be possible to buff (or pay a jeweler to buff) it. Buffing a crystal is very inexpensive--sometimes free--and may eliminate the scratch, or, at the very least, greatly reduce its prominence. However, glass crystals cannot be polished in this way; the only way to fix chips or scratches is to replace the crystal, which can run anywhere from $15-50+, depending on the type of crystal and amount of work required to replace it and test for proper water resistance. Replacing the mineral glass crystals on some diving watches can be very expensive.
Markers on a watch dial are ordinarily stuck on with little pins and/or a dab of adhesive. If the detached marker is still in the watch, this is ordinarily a fairly simple repair. The watch would be opened and the movement removed. Next, the jeweler would carefully place the marker back into position, probably adding a tiny drop of glue to keep it in place. A job like this can cost as little as $25, if it requires no replacement parts and you take your watch to a place that does a lot of watch repairs, as opposed to a general jewelry store that has to outsource the repair to a wholesale workshop.

May 06, 2011 | Police Phalanx Watch 11599JS 02 m Watch...

2 Answers

The crystal is scratched, can I fix that myself?


Thanks for contacting FIxYa.
  • Use a jeweler's loupe to identify all scratches on the watch crystal. You do not have to remove the watch crystal from the watch.
  • Use a polishing cloth to remove dirt, grit, lint or any debris on the watch crystal. Squeeze a small amount of standard toothpaste with abrasive properties onto the watch crystal. Gently brush the toothpaste into the crystal for five minutes. Wipe clean the watch crystal. and repeat another five minutes.
  • Use the jeweler's loupe to inspect your progress. Repeat application if necessary. Apply Brasso polish once the watch crystal is wiped clean. This will polish the crystal to a clear, bright shine.
  • Apply Autosol or Polywatch to the watch crystal in the same manner as toothpaste if you prefer to use a product specifically designed for watch crystals. These products will provide the same results as toothpaste. You may also apply Cerium Oxide, a glass scratch remover used specifically in the window manufacturing industry.
  • Apply a small amount of 3-micron diamond paste using your finger or a Kleenex if removing scratches from a sapphire crystal. Rub the paste in for about five minutes. Remove paste with cloth. Buff the sapphire crystal with one-quarter micron buffing diamond paste for finishing.
  • Use a toothpick to remove excess polish and gunk that may accumulate between the crystal and the bezel that secures the crystal in place. Gently work the toothpick around the diameter of the bezel. Wipe the bezel clean with a cloth.
  • Buff the watch crystal with a polishing cloth.

  • OR..take to a local jeweler/watchmaker.
    Best regards. Jewel

    Sep 10, 2010 | Relic Watches

    1 Answer

    I have a ladies Philip Stein, w, double movement. Tried to buff crystal. Now neither movement is working. Batteries are OK


    If the stems are in the time positon and the batteries are ok what probably happened is extreme heat. You tried to polish a mineral crystal and it got hot. The only type of crystal you can polish is acrylic. Most of these models come with mineral crystal or scratch proof sapphire crystal. I recommend going to a watch maker/technician and having the movements replaced. A reputable watch maker/technician will be pretty reasonable.

    Sep 19, 2009 | Philip Stein Teslar Small Case Diamond...

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