Tip & How-To about Computers & Internet

Why Is your PC dragging

Is your PC dragging? Does your broadband network creep along at dial-up speeds? Do Web pages take forever to load on your smart phone? Don't wait! These fixes will get you back into the fast lane.

Has your PC lost its pep? How about your network connection, your printer or even your phone? Here's our guide to giving your gear new life. Follow our tips and you can fire up your system and your other tech essentials. Supercharge your PC's hardwareTo get top performance from your PC, use high-performance hardware. No amount of tweaking inside Windows can give you the same kind of speed boost that a few judicious hardware upgrades can. The most effective way to soup up any computer is to start by updating the components inside. Here we'll explain how to upgrade the two most vital components: the RAM and the graphics card. WARNING: Before you attempt any of these upgrades, take precautions against static electricity by moving your PC to a clean, uncarpeted workspace and using an anti-static wrist strap to discharge any static electricity from your body. Upgrade your RAM
Adding RAM is often the most cost-effective upgrade you can make to speed up a sluggish computer. When a system runs short of RAM, it must swap the overflow data to the hard drive, which can significantly slow performance. Here's how to add memory to your desktop, laptop or netbook.

RAM comes in many flavors, such as DDR2 and DDR3. Newer technologies offer faster performance, but most motherboards accept only one type of RAM. Check your PC's manual to find out what type of RAM modules you need and how you have to install them. RAM dealers such as Crucial and Kingston offer handy online tools that identify the appropriate RAM for many PCs and motherboards. Also, to take advantage of more than 4GB of RAM, your PC needs to run a 64-bit operating system; Windows 7 is available in a 64-bit version and we highly recommend it.

To begin, open your PC's case and look for the memory slots. In laptops and netbooks the RAM slots are usually under a removable panel on the bottom of the machine. To remove existing RAM, release the clips at each end of the module so that it pops loose. With the slots clear, gently but firmly insert the new module.On a desktop machine, it's often best to seat one corner of the module first and then press the other end into place. Once you've fully inserted the module, the clips should close to hold the memory securely. On a laptop or netbook, press the end with the metal leads into place first and then press down until the clips snap tightly around the ends. For a complete guide, see "How to Upgrade Your PC's RAM." Replace your graphics board
Even if you're not a gamer, upgrading your graphics board can give your PC a serious boost, since Windows 7 and Windows Vista both feature fancy effects in their user interface. Though you can upgrade the graphics on some laptops, in this article we'll focus on desktop PCs.

When shopping for a new graphics board, select one that fits the slot on your PC. In most newer systems, it will be a PCI-Express slot; some older systems may have only PCI or AGP slots. Fortunately, graphics card makers still sell products to fit older slots, so an outdated motherboard need not be a total obstacle.With your new board at the ready, open the PC's case and locate the existing graphics card. Before attempting to pull it loose, remove the screw holding it down and release any plastic clips on the motherboard that may be securing it. Once the old card is out of the way, slide the new board straight down into the slot until it is firmly seated and the plastic clip on the motherboard has snapped tightly around it.Newer PCI-Express graphics boards often use so much juice that they require a special PCI-E power line from the computer's power supply. If you've installed such a card, connect this power line (the board may have two) before closing up the case. Then boot the PC and install the drivers from the disc the manufacturer provided. For more advice on choosing a graphics board, check out "Geek 101: A Graphics Card Primer." Streamline WindowsWhether you run Windows XP, Vista or 7, you have a few really good ways to cut out the fluff and make your operating system run more smoothly, quickly and efficiently. By turning off unnecessary features and disabling unwanted startup programs, you can get an instant speed boost. Knock out the fatWindows -- yes, even Windows XP -- is loaded with effects that take up system resources without delivering meaningful user benefits. If you turn some of these items off, Windows can divert the resources to more useful activities, such as running your programs. In Windows XP, open the System control panel and click the Advanced tab. Click Settings and then select the radio button marked Adjust for best performance. This will turn off some of the frilly effects, such as drop shadows under your menus, and make Windows a little snappier. In Vista, start by disabling the resource hog known as the Sidebar. In both Vista and Windows 7, turn off the Aero environment to reclaim some of your PC's lost memory and processor power. To do this, right-click the desktop and choose Personalize from the context menu. In Vista, click Window color and appearance and then uncheck the box for Enable Transparency. In Windows 7, select the theme labeled Windows 7 Basic. Shut down memory-hogging appsOnce you've installed a fair amount of programs on your PC -- your "core base" of apps, as it were -- you'll want to check that you don't have any unwanted applications running in the background that could slow down your PC. Such programs may be designed to launch when Windows starts up so that you can load their corresponding applications faster. The problem is that they run all the time, regardless of whether you intend to use the parent application. In Windows 7 or Vista, click Start and type msconfig in the "Search programs and files" field. Press Enter. In the System Configuration window, select the Startup tab. In the Command column, look for any programs that you don't want to wait for at boot-up time. For example, take iTunes: If you've installed this application, you'll find both iTunesHelper.exe and QTTask.exe. They're unnecessary additions -- the former launches when you start iTunes anyway and the latter merely places a QuickTime icon in the corner of your screen for easy program launching. Uncheck both. Once you've checked all of the programs you want to launch at startup and unchecked the programs you don't, click OK.
In addition to startup programs, you can find services on your PC; Microsoft recommends trimming them as well. Click Start, type services.msc into the search field and press Enter. Up pops the Services window, a list of options and executables that's even more confusing than the Startup window.

To identify which services to turn off (and which to leave on), check out Black Viper's exhaustive list of Windows 7's services across all of its various editions, along with a list of which services you should modify and how you should set their parameters. Armed with this advice, just double-click on any listed service. You need concern yourself only with the "Startup type" listing in the screen that appears next. By switching among the Automatic, Manual and Disabled modes, depending on Black Viper's recommendations, you'll be able to control exactly how services launch -- if at all -- during the Windows startup process and during your general use of the operating system. Every little bit helps.

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connect to wifi


Your desktop may already enjoy a wired broadband Internet connection, but a Wi-Fi connection will afford you greater latitude in Internet use.
Wires will not be necessary, so you can establish your PC in any room or area of your home or office and still stay connected to the Internet.
Fortunately, you only need a wireless router, broadband modem, and ethernet cable to make this Wi-Fi connection.

Disconnect your modem from the wall socket it's plugged into.
Connect the ethernet cable to the back of the modem.
There is a clearly marked ethernet port here.
This port will appear to be an oversized telephone jack.
Connect the other end of the ethernet cable to the ethernet port on the back of the wireless router.
This port will look exactly the same as the one on the rear of the modem.
Plug the broadband modem back up to the wall socket and wait for it to power on, initialize and detect its new connection to the wireless router.
Locate the manual that shipped with your wireless router.
Find the URL, or web address, that is contained within the pages of this manual.
This special web address is used to set up your router's network and security permissions.
Also, be sure to locate the default password provided within the pages of the manual.
Enter the URL into your web browser and allow the page to load.
When prompted, enter the password that you found within the instruction manual.
Begin setting up your new wireless network.
You will be asked for an "SSID," which is just a moniker for your new network.
This will be the name seen when the network is listed in an available network list.
Choose whatever name you like.
Select a password for your new network.
While encrypting your network is optional, it is highly recommended.
Along with the password, choose "WPA" security encryption.
"WEP" will also be an option but it is an older security protocol that is technologically inferior to WPA.
Click "Apply" to save your changes.
Click on the wireless icon on the right-hand side of the bottom toolbar on your PC's desktop. Select your network's SSID from the drop-down list.
Enter the password you chose for your network.
You will now be connected to WiFi Internet on your PC desktop and free to browse the Web.
Setting up a wireless network
http://windows.microsoft.com/en-US/windows-vista/Setting-up-a-wireless-network

Jun 27, 2013 | Computers & Internet

1 Answer

how to reinstall


Wi-Fi connection will afford you greater latitude in Internet use.
Wires will not be necessary, so you can establish your PC in any room or area of your home or office and still stay connected to the Internet.
Fortunately, you only need a wireless router, broadband modem, and ethernet cable to make this Wi-Fi connection.
Disconnect your modem from the wall socket it's plugged into.
Connect the ethernet cable to the back of the modem.
There is a clearly marked ethernet port here.
This port will appear to be an oversized telephone jack.
Connect the other end of the ethernet cable to the ethernet port on the back of the wireless router.
This port will look exactly the same as the one on the rear of the modem.
Plug the broadband modem back up to the wall socket and wait for it to power on, initialize and detect its new connection to the wireless router.
Locate the manual that shipped with your wireless router.
Find the URL, or web address, that is contained within the pages of this manual.
This special web address is used to set up your router's network and security permissions.
Also, be sure to locate the default password provided within the pages of the manual.
Enter the URL into your web browser and allow the page to load.
When prompted, enter the password that you found within the instruction manual.
Begin setting up your new wireless network.
You will be asked for an "SSID," which is just a moniker for your new network.
This will be the name seen when the network is listed in an available network list.
Choose whatever name you like.
Select a password for your new network.
While encrypting your network is optional, it is highly recommended. Along with the password, choose "WPA" security encryption.
"WEP" will also be an option but it is an older security protocol that is technologically inferior to WPA.
Click "Apply" to save your changes.
Click on the wireless icon on the right-hand side of the bottom toolbar on your PC's desktop. Select your network's SSID from the drop-down list.
Enter the password you chose for your network.
You will now be connected to WiFi Internet on your PC desktop and free to browse the Web.







http://static.highspeedbackbone.net/pdf/Z165-1302-Zonet-ZSR4154WE-Wireless-Broadband-Router-User-Manual.pdf

May 20, 2013 | Zonet ZSR4154WE Router

1 Answer

wi-fi


Your desktop may already enjoy a wired broadband Internet connection, but a Wi-Fi connection will afford you greater latitude in Internet use.
Wires will not be necessary, so you can establish your PC in any room or area of your home or office and still stay connected to the Internet.
Fortunately, you only need a wireless router, broadband modem, and ethernet cable to make this Wi-Fi connection.

Disconnect your modem from the wall socket it's plugged into.
Connect the ethernet cable to the back of the modem.
There is a clearly marked ethernet port here.
This port will appear to be an oversized telephone jack.

Connect the other end of the ethernet cable to the ethernet port on the back of the wireless router.
This port will look exactly the same as the one on the rear of the modem.
Plug the broadband modem back up to the wall socket and wait for it to power on, initialize and detect its new connection to the wireless router.
Locate the manual that shipped with your wireless router.
Find the URL, or web address, that is contained within the pages of this manual.
This special web address is used to set up your router's network and security permissions.
Also, be sure to locate the default password provided within the pages of the manual.

Enter the URL into your web browser and allow the page to load.
When prompted, enter the password that you found within the instruction manual.

Begin setting up your new wireless network.
You will be asked for an "SSID," which is just a moniker for your new network.
This will be the name seen when the network is listed in an available network list.
Choose whatever name you like.

Select a password for your new network.
While encrypting your network is optional, it is highly recommended.
Along with the password, choose "WPA" security encryption.
"WEP" will also be an option but it is an older security protocol that is technologically inferior to WPA.

Click "Apply" to save your changes.
Click on the wireless icon on the right-hand side of the bottom toolbar on your PC's desktop. Select your network's SSID from the drop-down list.
Enter the password you chose for your network.
You will now be connected to WiFi Internet on your PC desktop and free to browse the Web.
Setting up a wireless network
http://windows.microsoft.com/en-US/windows-vista/Setting-up-a-wireless-network

May 05, 2013 | eMachines EL1352G-01w (884483537679) PC...

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