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How to Clean Your Computer's Registry The Windows Registry is an enormous batch of files containing information about almost everything that occurs on the computer, from a visit to a Web site to a program installation. The registry also contains information about drivers and other essential programs, like DLLs -- small helper programs that often work with more than one application. This information is stored in the form of "keys" that help programs run. It's like a big blueprint for where everything goes on your computer and how it all fits together. Only computers running Windows operating systems have registries, and despite rumors to the contrary, Windows 7 will have a registry. A registry may have hundreds of thousands of entries, and new entries are created all the time. As it fills with information, the registry may cause a computer's performance to suffer. One problem is that Windows almost never removes registry entries, even if a program is uninstalled, as most uninstallers aren't able to effectively remove their own registry keys. And as files are moved around and programs are uninstalled, some registry keys point to programs or files that no longer exist or are located elsewhere. Fortunately, these errors don't have to be tolerated. The registry can be cleaned up, though not completely. And for your troubles, you may get better performance and decreased boot time. Some satisfied users report fewer instances of lag or Windows hanging (when the computer isn't responding). The exact performance boost varies depending on the state of the registry and the effectiveness of the cleaner program employed. You may also free up disk space, although most registry entries are very small. Registry cleaning is not without risks. This is a very sensitive area of your computer, and if you're happy with how your computer is running, don't go digging around. Trying to manually edit your registry can create errors in the registry that make it impossible to load Windows. Some registry-cleaning programs have been known to delete important registry keys or essential DLL files. And the performance improvements may be negligible, while running the program and approving each recommended deletion could take hours. In addition, reliable data on how registry cleaners affect performance are almost impossible to find. Most "performance tests" are actually produced by the developers of registry-cleaning tools. Despite these concerns, it isĀ­ possible to clean out some of the registry's gunk, and your computer may be better off for it. On the next page, we'll take a look at how to go about this delicate job. Before you mess around with the registry, it's best to to create a backup copy of the registry and to also save any important data to an external hard drive or disk. Some registry-cleaning programs have a feature to back up a copy of your system's registry. If not, a simple Internet search should lead you to a free backup program. Windows has a built-in program for editing the registry. It's creatively titled regedit.exe and can be accessed by going to the Start menu, clicking Run and typing in the program name. While this program is easy to access, it's difficult to use. Registry entries have long, oblique names that don't say much about what they represent. Even savvy computer users may have no idea what a particular entry points to. So unless you have specific instructions for how to alter or delete a clearly defined entry, it's best not to experiment with regedit.exe. Third-party registry-cleaner programs are plentiful and remove a lot of the confusing grunt work of parsing and deleting registry entries. To find a program that suits you, check reviews on sites like ZDNet, CNET, PC World or PC Magazine. Some of these programs are free or only fix a few entries at a time, which can be quite laborious when a registry may have 2,000 broken entries. Others may cost $20 or more and may come as part of a package of system utilities. It's not necessary to clean a registry more than once a month. Using a disk defrag program may provide additional performance boosts. Before you run the program you've chosen, make sure you close all other open programs, as well as those running in the system tray, next to the clock in the bottom right corner of your screen. Follow directions closely: Most of these cleaner programs are intuitive, first scanning the registry for errors and then offering choices to fix broken entries, but you may miss an important step or warning if you click madly and try to speed through the process. Some experts recommend against using programs that automatically delete registry errors [source: Bass]. Instead, it's better to approve deletions manually. The cleaner will likely offer a list of registry entries that it's safe to delete because they are certainly obsolete. It may also provide an option to "repair" an entry. Going deeper and deleting borderline entries could affect a program's ability to function, such as by deleting a DLL that the cleaner doesn't realize is shared by more than one program -- or you may irreparably damage your installation of Windows. When in doubt, let the entry stay. And that's about it. Hopefully you managed to clean up a few hundred entries without bricking your computer. If not, well, then you probably can't read this anymore and won't be interested in the links on the next page about registry cleaners and other related topics. Sources Bass, Steve. "How to Clean Your Windows Registry and Speed Up Your PC." PC World. Aug. 19, 2008. http://www.pcworld.com/printable/article/id,149951/printable.htmlBott, Ed. "Why I don't use registry cleaners." Ed Bott's Windows Expertise. April 19, 2005. http://www.edbott.com/weblog/?p=643"Degunking Your PC." PC Magazine. http://www.pcmag.com/article2/0,1759,1625129,00.aspOiaga, Marius. "No More Registry from Vista SP1 and XP SP3 to Windows 7?" Softpedia. Jan. 16, 2008. http://news.softpedia.com/news/No-More-Registry-from-Vista-SP1-and-XP-SP3-to-Windows- 7-76470.shtmlSandip. "Registry Hack to Enable Aero in Windows 7." Jan. 13, 2009. http://www.blogsdna.com/1996/registry-hack-to-enable-aero-in-windows-7.htmTittel, Ed. "How to Clean the Windows Registry." Information Week. March 28, 2005. http://www.informationweek.com/news/showArticle.jhtml?articleID=159907074

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Lenovo E430 is very slow


Run Disk Cleanup:-
Efficiency of laptop decreases when it contains too many junk files. To clean junk content from your system follow the steps below:
- Click Start
- Type Disk Cleanup
- Press Enter
- Select the drive which you wish to clean
- Click OK

Fix Registry Errors:-
Mostly laptop runs slow issue occurs due to broken Windows registry entries. Fixing registry will help you to boost up your laptop. You need to download and install a Registry Cleaner program to fix corrupt or broken registry entries. To download a reliable registry cleaner, go to famous website download.cnet and search there Reginout. Which I personally use and recommend the friends. After downloading run all of its tools one by one except Internet Optimizer, to clean all the junks and registry errors from your computer.

Nov 07, 2013 | Lenovo ThinkPad Edge E430 Laptop Computer

1 Answer

how do i fix windows delayed write failed. failed to save all the components for the file \System32\00007e87. The file is corrupted or unreadable.


Description:
Application popup: Windows - Delayed Write Failed : Windows was unable to save all the data for the file [name_of_the_file_you_want_to_save].
The data has been lost. This error may be caused by a failure of your computer hardware or network connection. Please try to save this file elsewhere.
Cause:
This problem occurs when the data redirector of a System flushes the contents of the file, and writes to a file handle with read-only access instead of to a file handle with write access.
When the redirector received an opportunistic lock break to none, it purged the cache for the file, but did not uninitialize the cache for the file.
More Information:
The redirector also needed to purge and uninitialize when the set end of file occurs because the opportunistic lock break is asynchronous. Because it did not uninitialize the cache for the file, it wrote to the incorrect file handle.
Remediation:
Warning: Serious problems might occur if you configure the registry incorrectly by using the Registry Editor. Microsoft recommends that you create a backup of your current registry before making changes.
1. Click Start, and then click Run.
2. In the Open box, type regedit, and then press ENTER.
3. In Registry Editor, locate the following subkey in the registry:
HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet \Services\LanmanServer\Parameters
4. In the right pane, click EnableOplocks, and then press ENTER.
5. In the Value data box, type 0, and then press ENTER.
6. Quit Registry Editor.

This problem occurs when the redirector flushes the contents of the file, and writes to a file handle with read-only access instead of to a file handle with write access. When the redirector received an opportunistic lock break to none, it purged the cache for the file, but did not uninitialize the cache for the file. The redirector also needed to purge and uninitialize when the set end of file occurs because the opportunistic lock break is asynchronous. Because it did not uninitialize the cache for the file, it wrote to the incorrect file handle.Back to the top RESOLUTION Service pack information
To resolve this problem, obtain the latest service pack for Microsoft Windows XP. For additional information, click the following article number to view the article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:
322389 How to obtain the latest Windows XP service pack Back to the top Hotfix information
A supported hotfix is available from Microsoft. However, this hotfix is intended to correct only the problem that is described in this article. Apply this hotfix only to systems that are experiencing this specific problem. This hotfix might receive additional testing. Therefore, if you are not severely affected by this problem, we recommend that you wait for the next software update that contains this hotfix.If the hotfix is available for download, there is a "Hotfix download available" section at the top of this Knowledge Base article. If this section does not appear, contact Microsoft Customer Service and Support to obtain the hotfix.Note If additional issues occur or if any troubleshooting is required, you might have to create a separate service request. The usual support costs will apply to additional support questions and issues that do not qualify for this specific hotfix. For a complete list of Microsoft Customer Service and Support telephone numbers or to create a separate service request, visit the following Microsoft Web site:http://support.microsoft.com/contactus/?ws=support
Note The "Hotfix download available" form displays the languages for which the hotfix is available. If you do not see your language, it is because a hotfix is not available for that language. The English version of this fix has the file attributes (or later) that are listed in the following table. The dates and times for these files are listed in coordinated universal time (UTC). When you view the file information, it is converted to local time. To find the difference between UTC and local time, use the Time Zone tab in the Date and Time tool in Control Panel.Windows XP SP1, Windows XP Tablet PC Edition

Date Time Version Size File name
--------------------------------------------------------------
30-Jan-2003 21:41 5.1.2600.1164 400,896 Mrxsmb.sys
30-Jan-2003 21:41 5.1.2600.1164 154,880 Rdbss.sys

Windows XP 64-Bit Edition

Date Time Version Size File name
-------------------------------------------------------------
30-Jan-2003 21:41 5.1.2600.1164 1,259,392 Mrxsmb.sys
30-Jan-2003 21:41 5.1.2600.1164 489,216 Rdbss.sys


Back to the top
WORKAROUND
Important This section, method, or task contains steps that tell you how to modify the registry. However, serious problems might occur if you modify the registry incorrectly. Therefore, make sure that you follow these steps carefully. For added protection, back up the registry before you modify it. Then, you can restore the registry if a problem occurs. For more information about how to back up and restore the registry, click the following article number to view the article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:
322756 How to back up and restore the registry in Windows
To work around this problem, disable opportunistic locking on the file server:

Click Start, and then click Run.
In the Open box, type regedit, and then press ENTER.
In Registry Editor, locate the following subkey in the registry:
HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet \Services\LanmanServer\Parameters
In the right pane, click EnableOplocks, and then press ENTER.
In the Value data box, type 0, and then press ENTER.
Quit Registry Editor.

Back to the top
STATUS
Microsoft has confirmed that this is a problem in the Microsoft products that are listed at the beginning of this article. This problem was first corrected in Microsoft Windows XP Service Pack 2.
Back to the top
MORE INFORMATION
For additional information about opportunistic locking, click the following article number to view the article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:
296264 Configuring Opportunistic Locking in Windows 2000
A trace of this problem shows that the file is opened at least two times, and shows the system improperly writing to the read-only file handle. A trace that shows this problem is similar to the following:

96 CLIENT SMB: C NT create & X, File = \newshare.xls
SMB: Desired Access = 0x00020089
(Read Data,Read EA,Read Attributes)
97 SERVER SMB: R NT create & X, FID = 0x5
SMB: Oplock Level = Batch

<content removed that displays the client program reading and locking the file, but the file is not closed>

450 CLIENT SMB: C NT create &amp; X, File = \newshare.xls
SMB: Desired Access = 0x0002019F
(Read/Write Data, Read/Write EA, Read/Write Attributes)

451 SERVER SMB: R NT create &amp; X, FID = 0xc007
SMB: Oplock Level = NONE

<content removed that displays the client program reading, locking, writing and flushing data on this file handle>

585 CLIENT SMB: C write &amp; X, FID = 0x5, Write 0xc00 at 0x00005000
PID = 0xFEFF TID = 0x1002 MID = 0x4400 UID = 0x0801
586 SERVER SMB: R write &amp; X - NT error, System, Error, Code = (34) STATUS_ACCESS_DENIED

Note The process identifier (PID) of 0xFEFF in frame 585 represents the client system process that is using the read-only file handle. It does not show the client program writing the data to disk.
Back to the top

Oct 31, 2011 | Dell Inspiron 1000 Notebook

1 Answer

regestry editor


A central hierarchical database used in Microsoft Windows 98, Windows CE, Windows NT, and Windows 2000 used to store information that is necessary to configure the system for one or more users, applications and hardware devices.

The Registry contains information that Windows continually references during operation, such as profiles for each user, the applications installed on the computer and the types of documents that each can create, property sheet settings for folders and application icons, what hardware exists on the system, and the ports that are being used.

The Registry replaces most of the text-based .ini files that are used in Windows 3.x and MS-DOS configuration files, such as the Autoexec.bat and Config.sys. Although the Registry is common to several Windows operating systems, there are some differences among them.A registry hive is a group of keys, subkeys, and values in the registry that has a set of supporting files that contain backups of its data. The supporting files for all hives except HKEY_CURRENT_USER are in the %SystemRoot%\System32\Config folder on Windows NT 4.0, Windows 2000, Windows XP, Windows Server 2003, and Windows Vista. The supporting files for HKEY_CURRENT_USER are in the %SystemRoot%\Profiles\Username folder. The file name extensions of the files in these folders indicate the type of data that they contain. Also, the lack of an extension may sometimes indicate the type of data that they contain.

Jun 20, 2008 | Microsoft Windows Vista Ultimate Edition

2 Answers

how to edit registry


1) to edit registry go to start / select run and type regedit. from there you are able to edit registry values. BEWARE because editing registry values may make your windows stop working. you should know what you are doing and you are responsible of the cosnequenses 2) a bat file is a batch file. Batch files are files that allow MS-DOS and Microsoft Windows users to create a lists of commands and/or programs to run once the batch file has been executed. 3) create a file called autorun.inf and type inside [autorun] open=file.exe save your file and write it in the cd you want to autorun the file.exe part must be replaced with the executable you want to load when your CD autoruns

Oct 08, 2007 | Microsoft Windows XP Professional With...

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