Tip & How-To about Heating & Cooling

Install Wood Stove Save Money on Heating

Fuel oil prices have been very volatile over the past few years. The price of electricity has increased dramatically for some areas recently and it will increase for many other areas in the near future. LP gas or Propane has jumped around with the changes in the oil pricing. The prices of natural gas have been fairly stable recently, but as fuel oil and electricity rise in cost the natural gas prices will follow as more and more large use customers convert to it to save money.


Even though the costs of many other home heating fuels has continued to rise the price of wood has stayed the same or even become lower. If you have easy access to this cheap fuel then you may want to consider burning wood as the way to heat your home.

The one fuel that has remained stable or dropped in price has been firewood. Because of the slowdown in the housing market many loggers that have been very busy for years cutting for lumber mills, now have time on their hands and are cutting firewood for some side money to survive and to just stay busy. Many timber stands that were under contract to be harvested are still standing because they are not worth cutting. All this means that if you are thinking about burning wood to heat your home, then now is the time to do it.

Check out the many possibilities that are available to use to heat your home comfortably and effectively. There are many ways that you can use to burn wood and heat easily and efficiently. Each home and situation is different. Make sure that you get the right wood burning appliance for your home.
http://www.fixya.com/support/r3595905-alternative_heating_pellet_stoves_and_pe

Posted by on

Heating & Cooling Logo

Related Topics:

Related Questions:

1 Answer

Dryer will not start. About 4-5 years old. Electric motor sounded a little weak when running the past few months. Heating seemed fine and heat vent is clean. What is cost of new electric motor?


Hello,

the part # for the motor is 31001589 i have found the price range of it from$100.00 to $140.00
you could copy and paste the part number and perform a google search under the "shopping" tab to find the motor

Jul 25, 2011 | Maytag PYE2300AY Electric Dryer

1 Answer

I live in Wisconsin (so it gets cold) and I just built a 1,000 sqft detached garage with 9' walls and I looking for the most efficient way to heat it. I will generally only be using it on weekends, but, wouldn't mind keeping it moderatly warm throughout the week as well. Looking for recommendations . . . . Thanks, Rob


Hi Rob - There are a bunch of variables that come into play. If you're going to use liquid fuels such as K1 kerosene or "home heating oil" (red dyed diesel fuel without the "road use tax"), you have to consider the tank location. Since home heating oil is really dyed diesel fuel, is reacts to cold just like diesel fuel does. It begins to gel - paraffin separates and the fuel gets cloudy around the 20 degree F mark and can clog the supply lines and filter. It gets worse as it gets colder. You can get around this somewhat by installing larger diameter and insulated fuel supply lines and moving the filter bowl assembly inside where it won't be subjected to that much cold. Your dealer may put additives in the fuel to prevent separation or you can add it yourself. K1 can be added to home heating oil tank to reduce clouding and straight K1 can be burned by an oil burner (you can not burn home heating oil in a K1 heater though). K1 on the other hand, flows just fine at these temps and lower. You'll need to supply storage tanks for these fuels.

The amount of heat or BTU's per gallon of these two fuels is significant. Home heating oil checks in with 50% more heat with around 140,000 BTUs per gallon while K1 has just over 90,000 BTUs per gallon. Cost is another factor. Typically, K1 sells for more than home heating oil, but has the benefits above. Prices for home heating oil and K1 are volatile and change daily and from dealer to dealer. Many dealers will lock prices and / or offer purchasing plans.

Next is natural gas (or just plain "gas") and propane (or LP). Gas is usually delivered via underground supply pipes and propane is delivered by truck to your on-site tank in areas that don't have the underground gas pipe infrastructure in place. The LP dealer will usually supply and install an above ground tank. You'll likely have just LP or both LP and gas available in your area. Heating appliances must be set up to burn one fuel or the other - not both. It is often a relatively inexpensive operation to convert from one fuel to the other, meaning separate appliances for either are not required. Gas prices are usually fixed for different times of the year, while LP prices may change daily and based on the volume used. Lower usage customers often pay more than their next door neighbors that use more from propane the same company. Like home heating oil and K1 dealers, many companies offer price locks and purchasing plans.

Gas and LP heating appliances burn "clean" meaning that there is little smoke, soot or tuning needed. Oil and K1 however, require regular tuning and cleaning to achieve maximum efficiency. Oil and K1 will burn but not rapidly combust - as gasoline would. LP and gas however, will explode if allowed to collect in an enclosed area and ignited by spark from a ringing telephone, etc. Prices of the heating appliance itself come into play as well.

You can heat the space by your choice of fuel and method of heat delivery. Forced hot air is probably going to be your best choice, but you could choose a forced hot water system if you add antifreeze to it. You'll also need a source of water to make up any lost due to pressure relief valve discharges, etc. If you chose the forced hot air system, you could probably get away without the expense of duct work - where a forced hot water design will require baseboard radiant heaters or a fan forced hot water coil.

That should be enough to get you thinking.. good luck!
Lastly, electric heat. Electric heat is 100% efficient, but is probably the most costly to operate. It's listed because it is available - not because I recommend it.

The best thing you can do is insulate. Insulation pays you back quicker with each rise in fuel costs. Put money into proper insulation as you can. Low E glass in your windows, weather strip doors, etc.

Nov 12, 2010 | Heating & Cooling

2 Answers

high gas mileage (15- 20 l per 100km)


try changing the oil also it will cause the engine to burn more fuel with bad oil because it gets hot and evaporates it alot more

Feb 03, 2009 | 2003 Dodge Grand Caravan AWD

1 Answer

loss in fuel efficiency


Check air filter. Has your driving habits changed? Or......It's unlikely but people do do it......gas theft. With prices high, people are taking a hose to steal gas from random vechiles. No bull. Try parking your vechile inside locked building, to see if that helps. If so, well, you got your soultion.

Sep 17, 2008 | 2002 Hyundai Santa Fe

Not finding what you are looking for?

403 people viewed this tip

Ask a Question

Usually answered in minutes!

Top Heating & Cooling Experts

paulcarew

Level 3 Expert

2461 Answers

Dan Webster
Dan Webster

Level 3 Expert

8220 Answers

Donni Steen

Level 3 Expert

659 Answers

Are you a Heating and Cooling Expert? Answer questions, earn points and help others

Answer questions

Loading...