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Difference between a hub , switch and a router

Hubs, switches, and routers are all devices which let you connect one or more computers to other computers, networked devices, or to other networks. Each has two or more connectors called ports into which you plug in the cables to make the connection. Varying degrees of magic happen inside the device, and therein lies the difference. I often see the terms misused so let's clarify what each one really means.

A hub is typically the least expensive, least intelligent, and least complicated of the three. Its job is very simple: anything that comes in one port is sent out to the others. That's it. Every computer connected to the hub "sees" everything that every other computer on the hub sees. The hub itself is blissfully ignorant of the data being transmitted. For years, simple hubs have been quick and easy ways to connect computers in small networks.

A switch does essentially what a hub does but more efficiently. By paying attention to the traffic that comes across it, it can "learn" where particular addresses are. For example, if it sees traffic from machine A coming in on port 2, it now knows that machine A is connected to that port and that traffic to machine A needs to only be sent to that port and not any of the others. The net result of using a switch over a hub is that most of the network traffic only goes where it needs to rather than to every port. On busy networks this can make the network significantly faster.


A router is the smartest and most complicated of the bunch. Routers come in all shapes and sizes from the small four-port broadband routers that are very popular right now to the large industrial strength devices that drive the internet itself. A simple way to think of a router is as a computer that can be programmed to understand, possibly manipulate, and route the data its being asked to handle. For example, broadband routers include the ability to "hide" computers behind a type of firewall which involves slightly modifying the packets of network traffic as they traverse the device. All routers include some kind of user interface for configuring how the router will treat traffic. The really large routers include the equivalent of a full-blown programming language to describe how they should operate as well as the ability to communicate with other routers to describe or determine the best way to get network traffic from point A to point B.

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connection of 6 computers to use one printer


A network printer can have many more connections. Most people have a wireless router that allow the whole household to use. The printer must have a unique IP address that was assigned by the router. From there the computer simply pints to that resource (IP via network cable) once it has been installed on each computer or device. Think of like a office setup.
Windows also allows for attached printers to be shared if the printer is not networked directly to the router (USB connected to PC), but the network setup still applies to the computers.

May 30, 2013 | Computers & Internet

1 Answer

how does a router and a splitter looks like and how as well they differ?


A router is a more sophisticated network device than either a switch or a hub. Like hubs and switches, network routers are typically small, box-like pieces of equipment that multiple computers can connect to. Each features a number of "ports" the front or back that provide the connection points for these computers, a connection for electric power, and a number of LED lights to display device status. While routers, hubs and switches all share similiar physical appearance, routers differ substantially in their inner workings.


Splitter is nothing but a Switch.
Switches may operate at one or more OSI layers, including physical, data link, network, or transport (i.e., end-to-end). A device that operates simultaneously at more than one of these layers is known as a multilayer switch.
In switches intended for commercial use, built-in or modular interfaces make it possible to connect different types of networks, including Ethernet, Fibre Channel, ATM, ITU-T G.hn and 802.11. This connectivity can be at any of the layers mentioned. While Layer 2 functionality is adequate for bandwidth-shifting within one technology, interconnecting technologies such as Ethernet and token ring are easier at Layer 3.
Interconnection of different Layer 3 networks is done by routers. If there are any features that characterize "Layer-3 switches" as opposed to general-purpose routers, it tends to be that they are optimized, in larger switches, for high-density Ethernet connectivity.

Feb 07, 2011 | D-Link AirPlus DI-524 Wireless Router

2 Answers

how to use cross cable and straight cables in network


ok, i think what you mean is this.  Crossover cable is for connecting 2 computers together without the need for a router.  also called pc-to-pc.  Straight cables need the use of a router or hub to connect 2 computers together.  Hope this helps, if not let me know more info.

Mar 06, 2009 | Southwestern Bell (S60802)

2 Answers

networking


Yes, but you'll need a crossover cable to connect the two routers. You could buy a hub or a switch. They are easier to configure and cheaper.

Sep 27, 2007 | Linksys SD208 8-Port Ethernet Switch...

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