Tip & How-To about Electrical Supplies

Wiring a GFIC alternative.

When wiring a GFCI (Ground Fault Interrupter Circuit) receptacle you would normally connect the wire coming from the service panel or the hot wire to the LINE connection at the GFCI and then connect the other receptacles you wish to protect to the LOAD side on the GFCI. But let's say you have installed a GFCI in a garage circuit and want to run a wire to the garage door opener from that circuit without the garage door opener receptacle being protected by the GFCI but still want all other receptacles protected. Reason being that the garage door opener will trip the GFCI more often than not. You may also want to have a receptacle for a freezer in the garage. You do not want that freezer protected by the GFCI circuit as it may trip without your knowledge and cause all the food to spoil. Warning: Only install a single plug receptacle for the freezer and not a double plug receptacle. That way only one thing, the freezer, can be plugged into this receptacle as it is not GFCI protected. The way to avoid the breaker tripping is to connect the garage door opener & freezer receptacle to the LINE side of the GFCI. This way it is not protected by the GFCI and there is no danger of that receptacle loosing power due to a tripped breaker on the GFCI. When the GFCI trips power will still be available at any receptacle connected on the line side. On any GFCI you can connect two sets of wires to the LINE side. If you have more than two you will have to connect those together under a wire nut and then use a jumper wire to connect to the LINE on the GFCI. Look at the photo and you will see the 2 sets of holes to connect at the LINE side (Bottom) on the back of the GFCI receptacle. There are also 2 sets of holes to connect on the LOAD side (Upper). Of course you would use a wire nut and jumper to connect all the ground wires.

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installing arc fault interrupter with ground fault


If you meant arch fault with ground fault then no, the two types interfere with each other and trip the breaker as one senses an arch and the other grounding.
If you meant ground fault breaker with a GFCI. receptacle, you only need one of the two, either GFCI. breaker or receptacle.

and for circuits, you can put up to 12 devices (i.e receptacle, light)assuming they consume 1 amp each. Anything over 12 amps or 80% of the rating on the breaker, it will trip/reset.
Or if your talking about wires on a breaker then no more than 2 wires recommended. Try adding a junction box outside the panel if your trying to add other branch circuits or tap off of a receptacle.

Apr 21, 2013 | Siemens Seimens Arc Fault Breaker

1 Answer

installing arc fault interrupter with ground fault


Question is vague. Arc fault and ground fault are slightly different.

Are you installing arc fault breaker?
http://waterheatertimer.org/How-to-wire-GFCI.html#arc-fault
http://waterheatertimer.org/How-to-replace-circuit-breaker.html

Code says Maximum 12 boxes per circuit breaker.

Arc fault breaker and GFCI outlet in bathroom?
>>> do not connect this way.
Do not install 2 fault protections on same circuit.
Install the arc fault circuit breaker, and then remove bathroom GFCI, and replace with ordinary outlet, or switch-outlet.

How many outlets can be connected to a bathroom GFCI?
It depends on total boxes on circuit.
Count the boxes. Max 12 boxes per circuit breaker.

How many amps can be connected to 15 amp device?
15 x 80% = 12 amps
Electricians use 80% rule to calculate safe maximum
http://waterheatertimer.org/Color-codewire.html
http://waterheatertimer.org/See-inside-main-breaker-box.html

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Apr 21, 2013 | Siemens Seimens Arc Fault Breaker

1 Answer

Which color gets hooked up to what on a ceiling fan


For residential wiring, some basic rules given in the NEC are:
  • Phase wire in a circuit may be black, red, orange (high leg delta) insulated wire, sometimes other colors, but never green, gray, or white (whether these are solid colors or stripes). Specific exceptions apply, such as a cable running to a switch and back (known as a traveler) where the white wire will be the hot wire feeding that switch. Another is for a cable used to feed an outlet for 250VAC 15 or 20 amp appliances that do not need a neutral, there the white is hot (but should be identified as being hot, usually with black tape inside junction boxes).
  • The neutral wire is identified by gray or white insulated wire, perhaps with stripes.
  • Grounding wire of circuit may be bare or identified insulated wire of green or having green stripes. Note that all metallic systems in a building are to be bonded to the building grounding system, such as water, natural gas, HVAC piping, and others.
  • Larger wires are furnished only in black; these may be properly identified with suitable paint or tape.
  • All wiring in a circuit except for the leads that are part of a device or fixture must be the same gauge. Note that different size wires may be used in the same raceway so long as they are all insulated for the maximum voltage of any of these circuits.
  • The Code gives rules for calculating circuit loading.
  • Ground-fault circuit interrupter (GFCI) protection is required on receptacles in wet locations. This includes all small appliance circuits in a kitchen, receptacles in a crawl space, basements, bathrooms and a receptacle for the laundry room, as well as outdoor circuits within easy reach of the ground. However, they are not required for refrigerators because unattended disconnection could cause spoilage of food, nor for garbage disposals. Instead, for refrigerators and other semi-permanent appliances in basements and wet areas, use a one-outlet non-GFCI dedicated receptacle. Two-wire outlets having no grounding conductor may be protected by an upstream gfci and must be labelled "no grounding". Most GFCI receptacles allow the connection and have GFCI protection for down-stream connected receptacles. Receptacles protected in this manner should be labeled "GFCI protected".
  • Most circuits have the metallic components interconnected with a grounding wire connected to the third, round prong of a plug, and to metal boxes and appliance chassis.
  • Furnaces, water heaters, heat pumps, central air conditioning units and stoves must be on dedicated circuits
  • The code provides rules for sizing electrical boxes for the number of wires and wiring devices in the box.
The foregoing is just a brief overview and must not be used as a substitute for the actual National Electrical Code.

Jan 29, 2011 | Hampton Bay 54 In. Flemish Pewter Ceiling...

1 Answer

WIRING DIAGRAM FOR HOUSE


I think you mean a grund fault interrupter type breaker or receptacle.

The ground fault breakers fit into a regular box and they snap over the HOT input power tab like miost breakers AND they have a white pigtail wire that connects to the neutral bar in the panel.

The branch circuit that is fed from this breaker has BOTH the hot and the neutral connecting to the breaker as the breaker has two terminals for the purpose. The grounding wire of the branch circuit still goes to tthe ground bar in the panel.

For a GFCI receptacle, the branch circuit feeds the terminals labeled "LINE" and if other receptacles are to be protected by this device, they have their circuits continued from the terminals on the receptacle labeled "{OAD".

Mar 03, 2010 | Aiwa Televison & Video

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