Tip & How-To about Computers & Internet

Increase your XP security by removing the Everyone Security Access

I have been using Windows XP Professional for years now never bothered with the whole Vista upgrade seemed just like window dressing to me, I am considering upgrade to windows 7 in the mean time for all you XP devotees here is a great tip.

Remove the EVERYONE access from your drives this is easy to do all you need to do is double click My Computer, find your primary partition C: drive local disc then right click and choose properties and find the security tab, then remove the everyone group , don't panic you still have the ADMIN and SYSTEM and USERS groups, click remove and apply.



NOTE: If you have Windows XP Home you don't have this by default the easiest way to add the tab is to use FileSecPatch.exe this will change one byte in the rshx32.dll (abackslash to a space at 0x9F0) and save it under a new dll name it will then registers the new dll

(HKEY_CLASSES_ROOTCLSID{1F2E5C40-9550-11CE-99D2-00AA006E086C}InProcServer32).

Alternative download link @ hulpalkmaar handy tools




This also takes effect immediately so you will know if it has worked you can also remove the patch whenever you wish, this is much easier than the forum at the Neowin forums so only use this method if the patch above causes you problems.

All you need to do when you have the Security tab is follow the same procedure as for XP Professional

Alternative method for the security tab is to use FJXPFileSecExt this will add its own version of the tab DON'T use the two together I prefer the FileSecPatch to the FJXPFileSecExt, however it's up to you, here is the Security Patch Extension from FJXP


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I down graded from vista to xp cant install drivers


Hello,

As for your problem Toshiba is not did not bother creating a Windows XP compatible drivers for the Model L500-018 as it is their high end Notebook for the year 2007 and discontinued it on 2009. what you can is to upgrade from Windows Vista Home to Vista Premium for more functionality and XP compatibility or upgrade to much better Windows 7 as the Vista drivers are accepted by windows 7 OS.

Hope this helps.

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I have recently installed vista. My pixma MP760


is the driver that you are using is for vista or you are using the xp driver? if you have upgraded to vista the driver for your printer should be vista compliant, if you dont have version for your vista you can download it thru the internet, just visit the site of the device manufacturer there you can get a driver that supports vista

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Canon pixma500


This product can be used with Windows Vista.
  • To use it with Windows Vista, you must install the driver software for Windows Vista.
  • The Windows XP drivers for your product cannot be used under Windows Vista.
  • Easy-WebPrint and PhotoRecord do not support Windows Vista.
Upgrading from Windows XP to Windows Vista :
Before upgrading your OS from Windows XP to Windows Vista, delete / uninstall all the Windows XP driver software first; then, upgrade the OS to Windows Vista and install Vista driver software.
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Delete / uninstall the Windows XP drivers before installing Vista drivers.

I hope it helps!!!

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WIndows Vista to XP Pro


Owners of the OEM editions of Vista Business and Vista Ultimate can downgrade to Windows XP Professional, including Tablet PC Edition and x64 Edition. Only the OEM editions qualify for a downgrade, so if you purchased a new PC with either Business or Ultimate preinstalled, you're in like Flynn.

Those who aren't: All users of Vista Home Basic and Vista Home Premium, and anyone who upgraded to Vista using a retail edition of any of the operating system's SKUs. You are, as they say, SOL.

How do I downgrade? Install a copy of Windows XP Professional with the product key that came with the copy, and then when you hit the activation screen -- which is near the end of the installation process -- select the activate by phone option rather than the online method. You'll likely end up talking with a live rep; tell him that you're downgrading from Vista to XP, and give him the Vista product key. The rep is supposed to walk you through the rest.

Where do I get the XP install disc? Until this summer, Microsoft put the responsibility on the end users' shoulders. For example, in this Vista downgrade rights document (download PDF) targeting resellers, the company said "media is provided by the customer."

A few months ago, however, Microsoft relaxed, and began allowing resellers to provide Windows XP setup CDs to customers buying Vista Business- and Ultimate-equipped PCs. In some cases, discs are shipped with the PCs; in others, users must request them. Don't bother calling Microsoft; it won't provide installation media, and will instead direct you to your reseller.



If the computer maker won't send a Windows XP Pro disc, you're on your own. While perhaps not easy, getting your hands on the install media isn't impossible. Any copy of Windows XP Professional will do -- it doesn't matter if it's already been installed and/or whether the license is in use -- as long as you can find its product key. Install it (see "How do I downgrade?" above) using that key, then activate over the phone with the Vista key.

As a last resort, buy a copy. This isn't a downgrade, not as Microsoft defines it, but it's what most users think of when they use the term.

What can I do if I don't have downgrade rights? Nothing is stopping you from punting to XP other than the money invested in the Vista license already on the PC and what it will cost to replace it. The total may be inconsequential to some, a deal-breaker for others. But there are options.

Because you're paying for the swap, you can switch to any flavor of XP. Windows XP Home, for instance, typically sells online for between $50 and $90 less than Professional. Windows XP Media Center is usually priced between the two.

Once you pick an edition, you can choose from OEM, upgrade and full product versions, which are priced in that order, lowest first. OEM, often called "system builder," omits support and can only be installed on one machine, ever. Windows XP Home OEM is sold online at for around $90. The upgrade version, which runs about $100, can be installed, removed and installed on another PC, but requires proof that you own a legitimate copy of an older operating system. You don't need to install that predecessor, only insert its CD at some point during the XP installation. Eligible versions for an XP upgrade include Windows 98, Windows 98 SE and Windows Millennium.

Finally, there's the most expensive option: the full edition, which sells for around $190. No earlier Windows version is necessary to install this, and like the upgrade, it can be transferred later to another PC.

Of course, the most affordable downgrade is one using the XP installation CD you saved when you upgraded that well-worn machine of yours to Vista earlier this year. You did save it, right? If you didn't get an install disc with that box when you bought it -- and some vendors don't bother, instead slapping restore files in a hidden partition on the hard drive, which has been, of course, copied over by Vista -- you may be able to pry one from the reseller. Dell owners, for instance, can use an online form to request one free copy of the install CD.

I have XP and I'm ready to downgrade. Now what? From here, a downgrade is just like any clean install. You'll need to back up data files, record and/or copy settings and passwords, and make sure you have installation files and/or discs for the applications you'll reinstall in XP. If you've upgraded to software suitable for Vista, it's likely that the newer programs will also run under XP. Copying data and the application installation files you've downloaded from the Web is easiest if you plug in an external drive.


There aren't any downgrade utilities to do the kind of work that upgrade, or migration tools, provide when you're moving up in the world, operating system-wise, so don't bother looking for them. Pity.

Any caveats? Although Vista has been out for less than a year, that's plenty of time for change. If you bought a machine preinstalled with Vista, make sure there are XP drivers for the PC, its components and any new peripherals before you downgrade. Check the computer maker's site. If you find any major holes, reconsider.

I'm lazy but still want to downgrade. What are my options? If you're fed up with Vista, but not so sick of it that you're ready to face a complete mulligan on the operating system, virtualization might be for you. Add virtualization machine software on the Vista-running PC, create a VM, then install XP into the VM. You'll still need a licensed copy of Windows XP to be legit. Fortunately, unlike Vista, XP's EULA doesn't forbid virtualization. (Only Vista Business and Ultimate, the downgrader's friends, can be legally run in a virtual environment.)

You really have three picks here, including Microsoft's own Virtual PC 2007 (free), SWsoft's Parallels Workstation ($50) and VMware Inc.'s VMware Workstation ($189).

The biggest bonus in going virtual is that if you change your mind -- again -- and decide Vista isn't so bad after all, you can just delete the VM and have your old, or new, machine back.

Apr 10, 2008 | Microsoft Windows XP Professional With...

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