Tip & How-To about Dryers

When to Buy a New Dryer or Fix Old One?

If your old clothes dryer is not working well, how do you tell if it's time to replace it?Here are some things to check before you set it on the curb with a"FREE" sign.
If it still turns on, runs a proper cycle, doesn't make a lot of squeaks and groans, and your clothes are at least attempting to dry, then check the following before you decide to replace.

1. Check and empty your lint trap before each load. If airflow is restricted, your dryer will need longer to get the job done. A clean lint trapwill allow for maximum intake air to the dryer blower.
2. Check the exhaust duct work for lint buildup. If the 4" duct work that carries your warm, moist, lint-laden air to the exterior of your home is blocked with years of lint and moisture, chances are pretty good your dryer is taking longer than it should to get your clothes dry.

  • Disconnect the dryer power cord (and gas line if a gas unit), slide the dryer forward far enough to access the 4" duct work clamp at the back of the dryer. Disconnect the duct work at the dryer and separate to inspect both in the dryer exhaust duct and the duct work as well.
  • Remove all built up lint. You may need to access under the floor, or in the crawlspace, or basement to get at all the areas that lint may be built up. Remember that when there's an elbow chances are pretty good there's lint in there, so take the time to separate the duct work where needed to give it a thorough clean out.
  • Long straight sections of duct work can be easily cleaned by using a Webster-style pole brush.
  • Clean the exhaust duct of the dryer but be careful not to damage anything inside your dryer
  • Reconnect and turn the dryer on air fluff to blow the rest out.
3. Remove lint build up from inside the machine
  • Turn power off again
  • Remove the front cover of your dryer
  • Remove the front drum support/air duct from the front of the dryer
  • Carefully vacuum the lint out of the dryer with soft brush attachment on your vac. Be careful not to damage any igniter or electrical items.
  • Clean the inside of the lint trap duct of sediment/ buildup
4. While you've got it open replace the drive belt and check the pulleys.

If this improves your dryer, hang onto it for a while longer! Most times dryers just need a good cleaning and the exhaust duct cleaned. If you're not satisfied with the results, take it to the curb and recycle it to another family.

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Hi-Limit Thermostat


Hi Frank Liles..
Here are a few causes and things to check

Clogged Vent
If your dryer seems to run forever, it could be because of a clogged vent or internal ductwork. Your dryer may have an automatic cycle that turns off the dryer when the clothes are dry. It does this with a special thermostat or moisture-sensing system.
Normally, this is what happens during an automatic cycle:
The thermostat tells the dryer to heat until the interior of the dryer reaches a pre-set temperature--say 135 degrees.
When the dryer reaches the pre-set temperature, the thermostat tells the timer to begin advancing. (If there's a moisture sensor, the timer advances only if the moisture content of the clothing is low enough.)
The timer advances until the interior cools, then the thermostat tells the timer to stop advancing, and tells the dryer to start heating again.
This cycle continues until the clothes are dry.
But...if the vent is clogged, the dryer may never reach the proper operating temperature, so it doesn't send the signal to the timer and the dryer continues to run indefinitely, even if the clothes are completely dry. To fix the problem, clean the vent and/or internal ductwork.
Heating Element
Your dryer's heating element may be partially burned out. If it is, your dryer still heats, but at such a low temperature that it takes three or four times as long to dry the clothes. If the element is partially burned out, replace the heating element. You can check for an ohm reading but will need to refer to the service manual for proper reading. This sometimes on the tech sheet located somewhere on the dryer. Usually between 9-13 ohms.
Cycling thermostat
Although this isn't a common problem, one of the thermostats that controls the temperature in your dryer may break and cause the dryer to heat poorly. If so, you need to replace it. The thermostat is usually a small, round, black device mounted to an oblong steel plate. The plate is mounted to the internal ductwork .
This thermostat usually has four wires going to it. Check the 2 terminals that are opposite each other and are the closer together of the 2. These 2 terminals should have continuity. If not replace the thermostat.
Please take time to rate me
Bud

Oct 17, 2012 | Bosch Nexxt WTMC3321US Electric Dryer

3 Answers

Maytag Dryer


HI,

If your dryer seems to run forever, it could be because of a clogged vent or internal ductwork. Your dryer may have an automatic cycle that turns off the dryer when the clothes are dry. It does this with a special thermostat or moisture-sensing system.

Normally, this is what happens during an automatic cycle:

  • The thermostat tells the dryer to heat until the interior of the dryer reaches a pre-set temperature--say 135 degrees.


  • When the dryer reaches the pre-set temperature, the thermostat tells the timer to begin advancing. (If there's a moisture sensor, the timer advances only if the moisture content of the clothing is low enough.)


  • The timer advances until the interior cools, then the thermostat tells the timer to stop advancing, and tells the dryer to start heating again.


This cycle continues until the clothes are dry. But…if the vent is clogged, the dryer may never reach the proper operating temperature, so it doesn't send the signal to the timer and the dryer continues to run indefinitely, even if the clothes are completely dry. To fix the problem, clean the vent and/or internal ductwork.

Aug 28, 2008 | Dryers

3 Answers

My whirlpool duet electric dryer needs several cycles to dry normal load of clothes, dryer is 6 yrs old. Is it the heating element or could it be something else?


Initial reaction is yes, probably.

Second guess would be the switch.

The switch tells the dryer what to do, and if the heating element is good, it will do it.

Test the switch quickly first, and if it checks out, look at the element.

Oct 05, 2009 | Whirlpool Duet 7.0 Cu. Ft. Capacity Plus...

2 Answers

my dryer takes long time to dry the clothes. It


Check the following areas thoroughly to address this issue.


1. Venting
Make sure the dryer vent hose, as well as the rest of the vent duct, is not clogged.

Unless regular maintenance is performed, chances are there is a lot of lint accumulated inside the dryer. This might affect the drying time and could be a fire hazard. Make sure to have your dryer cleaned regularly. Because this might involve taking most of the dryer apart, it is recommended to have a qualified appliance repairman perform this task.

2. Thermostat
There are a couple of cycling thermostats inside the dryer. If one of them breaks down, it might affect the dryer's performance. Replace the defective thermostat.

3. Heating element
A heating element might only be partially burned out, in which case it would still work but will take longer time to dry the clothes. Replace the element if found defective.

NOTE***(This unit is equipped with a dryness control board. if all points above check out ok, replace this board).

Jul 21, 2009 | GE Profile Harmony DPGT750EC Electric...

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