Tip & How-To about Computers & Internet

Multiple Computers on Same Network, Continual Internet Connection Dropout

After adding that second or third computer to your home network are you constantly fighting over who's using the internet connection? When your high schooler logs into his facebook chat, are you getting dropped off of your internet connection?
Or have you added a wifi router and is your whole network not staying connected like it did before you added your wifi?
These are common issues and we answer these questions often at FixYa.
Here is s a tip that will get you past the internet connection being dropped by someone else on your network attempting to log into the internet or help you get that wifi up and working with out all the cut outs and drop offs.

Follow this simple procedure and you'll be amazed!
1. Turn off everything. Turn off computers, routers, modem, printers... everything that's on your LAN (local area network) or home ethernet.
2. Turn on your wireless router next. With the ethernet cable connected to your wifi router to your modem and let it cycle up to running. If you aren't running wifi, do this with your main router. Make sure your modem and everything else is still off.
3. Turn on your modem (enet cable attached to wifi router or main router) and let the modem cycle up to running.

What you've done is allowed your wifi router to be established as the "MAC" Address for your modem. Modems look for a single MAC address. Once the router has this address, the router will maintain the connection with the modem and the internet, AND will assign MAC addresses to your computers, network printers, network routers etc, while still maintaining your connection to the internet.

4. Turn on all other peripherals, computers and network printers. At this point the order of power up isn't important, because your router will be assigning separate addresses to all the computers, etc on your network.

That's it! The secret's out! Just keep this handy... remember if you have power outage, you'll need to reboot in this order again... Happy Home Networking

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1 Answer

Home computer with no internet service at all and someone is on our computer some how and looking in to our house how and who is it


Without knowing more about your setup, there are a few ways this can happen. First, some computers allow remote connecting via Bluetooth so check your Bluetooth security settings to ensure nothing is paired up that shouldn't be. Second, if you have a wireless network people can still connect to it even if no internet is present. Third, if your home computer has it's wireless active there is a very remote chance it could be mistakenly configured so someone could connect directly to the computer. Network security is a big deal and any wireless source could give an outside individual access to your network. That said, without the internet the individual would have to be local and pretty close to your wireless source, so it shouldn't be too hard to find out who it is.

Jan 03, 2014 | Computers & Internet

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no access in yahoo messeger


Ascertain that computer has internet conntivity. For example, attempt to browse the internet as verification of network connectivity. Usually the computers networks structures either as ethernet broadband or high speed wireless network makes messanger communication attainable. First, ascertain the computers structures to make possible establishing messenger. For example the yahoo messager when downloaded on the computer that derived connectivity from dial up structures least attains telecommuncations. Also once the structure that makes telemunication attainable is in place, alternate requirements make attainable an experince. For example, adding contact to the account from where telecommunications is attainable.

Feb 18, 2011 | Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium 64BIT...

2 Answers

Internet connection


Hey dadof9,

Depending on how you normally connect to the internet, the cause of this problem may vary.

If you have high-speed internet service through a company like Time Warner or Comcast and have a physical wire running from your computer to the router, you may want to make sure that your internet connection is set to use a local area network connection. In Windows XP this can generally be done by clicking on the "Tools" link at the top of any Internet Explorer page, selecting "Internet Options" from the drop-down menu, then clicking on the "Connections" tab in the window that opens. You'll want to make sure that your connection type is set to "Never dial a connection," or your computer will continue to look for the internet using a dial-up modem.

Should your home use a wireless network instead, your computer may not be able to access the internet if the network is WEP or WPA/WPA2-encrypted, your computer has not been added to the router's MAC filters yet, your computer has the incorrect DNS settings, or if the computer isn't able to pick up the wireless router's signal.

Addressing problems with WEP or WPA encryption, MAC filters and DNS settings generally does require some home networking knowledge, so if you're not quite sure how to adjust these you may want to speak with your internet service provider (ISP) for more information. Many ISP's are able to provide step-by-step, over the phone support and troubleshooting for networking issues, and may even be able to send a technician to your home to help you get things up and running again.

Signal problems however, can prove to be a little more difficult to remedy. If you live in an area with a high concentration of wireless network devices (or own several others yourself), you may be receiving interference from the other wireless devices in your neighborhood. Typically, changing the channel on which a wireless device broadcasts will improve this type of situation, but there are no guarantees that your neighbors aren't thinking the same thing. Additionally, how homes are constructed may interfere with a wireless connection. While surfaces such as wood and plaster do not cause much interference, any metallic, brick or stone surface may cause a significant loss in signal strength.

Please keep in mind that these are by no means the only reasons why you would not be able to establish an internet connection, and that your best bet is to generally contact your ISP if you have any doubts. Third party technicians (such as Geek Squad® agents) may charge you for any services rendered, though many ISP’s will provide networking services for their subscribers free of charge.

Hope this helps you out.

Sincerely,
Aaron
Go Ahead. Use Us.

Jun 17, 2008 | E-Machines eMachines Desktop PC

1 Answer

computer disconnects from Internet when my neighbor is using his computer


the Lock means that he has a secure network or he has the WAP enabled.. Can the two networks interfere? Yes. The two networks will "fight" over which one will your computer use to connect.. and sometimes you will connect to his network and therefore get no internet or limited connectivity.. You can make sure that your computer only connects to your network by permanently removing his SSID from your settings.

Mar 25, 2008 | Linksys Wireless-G WAP54G 802.11g/b...

1 Answer

home wireless network


Most wireless1.gif networks are setup as infrastructure networks, meaning all communication is to/from a wireless access1.gif point/router that serves the same function as a switch/hub in a wired network as a central point to transfer communications from machine to machine. One works over the air the other through a wire.

There is an alternate form of wireless networking1.gif refered to as ad hoc -- in this version of wireless networking every wireless adapter1.gif can "talk" to any other wireless adapter configured with the same SSID (name) and security encryption (none, WEP, WPA). This is how somewhat less impromptu wireless networks are created similar to impromptu infrared networks some of us have used. One limitation of the ad hoc networks I have seen configured to date is access to the internet. I have posted an article where a stationary PC (required to be running for any other wireless machine to access the internet) with a wireless card in ad hoc mode could act as the router for wireless network but it required a cabled connection the internet. I suppose it could be a second wireless connection on a separate channel with a second wireless adapter in an infrastructure network but why? These types of networks are only recommended in another article for a limited (small) number of machines.

Based on this are you asking to create an ad hoc network to connect 2 PC's1.gif wirelessly without a wireless router1.gif or access to the internet from the wireless network (without a dedicated machine)?

Dec 19, 2007 | Linksys Wireless-G Broadband Router

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