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Editing The Registry?

Editing The Registry

The Registry Editor (REGEDIT.EXE) is included with most version of Windows (although you won't find it on the Start Menu) it enables you to view, search and edit the data within the Registry. There are several methods for starting the Registry Editor, the simplest is to click on the Start button, then select Run, and in the Open box type "regedit", and if the Registry Editor is installed it should now open and look like the image below.

An alternative Registry Editor (REGEDT32.EXE) is available for use with Windows NT/2000, it includes some additional features not found in the standard version, including; the ability to view and modify security permissions, and being able to create and modify the extended string values REG_EXPAND_SZ & REG_MULTI_SZ.

Create a Shortcut to Regedit
This can be done by simply right-clicking on a blank area of your desktop, selecting New, then Shortcut, then in the Command line box enter "regedit.exe" and click Next, enter a friendly name (e.g. 'Registry Editor') then click Finish and now you can double click on the new icon to launch the Registry Editor.

Using Regedit to modify your Registry
Once you have started the Regedit you will notice that on the left side there is a tree with folders, and on the right the contents (values) of the currently selected folder.

Like Windows explorer, to expand a certain branch (see the structure of the registry section), click on the plus sign [+] to the left of any folder, or just double-click on the folder. To display the contents of a key (folder), just click the desired key, and look at the values listed on the right side. You can add a new key or value by selecting New from the Edit menu, or by right-clicking your mouse. And you can rename any value and almost any key with the same method used to rename files; right-click on an object and click rename, or click on it twice (slowly), or just press F2 on the keyboard. Lastly, you can delete a key or value by clicking on it, and pressing Delete on the keyboard, or by right-clicking on it, and choosing Delete.

Note: it is always a good idea to backup your registry before making any changes to it. It can be intimidating to a new user, and there is always the possibility of changing or deleting a critical setting causing you to have to reinstall the whole operating system. It's much better to be safe than sorry!

Importing and Exporting Registry Settings

A great feature of the Registry Editor is it's ability to import and export registry settings to a text file, this text file, identified by the .REG extension, can then be saved or shared with other people to easily modify local registry settings. You can see the layout of these text files by simply exporting a key to a file and opening it in Notepad, to do this using the Registry Editor select a key, then from the "Registry" menu choose "Export Registry File...", choose a filename and save. If you open this file in notepad you will see a file similar to the example below:

Quote:

REGEDIT4

[HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\Setup]
"SetupType"=dword:00000000
"CmdLine"="setup -newsetup"
"SystemPrefix"=hex:c5,0b,00,00,00,40,36,02


The layout is quite simple, REGEDIT4 indicated the file type and version, [HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\Setup] indicated the key the values are from, "SetupType"=dword:00000000 are the values themselves the portion after the "=" will vary depending on the type of value they are; DWORD, String or Binary.

So by simply editing this file to make the changes you want, it can then be easily distributed and all that need to be done is to double-click, or choose "Import" from the Registry menu, for the settings to be added to the system Registry.

Deleting keys or values using a REG file
It is also possible to delete keys and values using REG files. To delete a key start by using the same format as the the REG file above, but place a "-" symbol in front of the key name you want to delete. For example to delete the [HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\Setup] key the reg file would look like this:

Quote:

REGEDIT4

[-HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\Setup]


The format used to delete individual values is similar, but instead of a minus sign in front of the whole key, place it after the equal sign of the value. For example, to delete the value "SetupType" the file would look like:

Quote:

REGEDIT4

[HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\Setup]
"SetupType"=-


Use this feature with care, as deleting the wrong key or value could cause major problems within the registry, so remember to always make a backup first.

Regedit Command Line Options
Regedit has a number of command line options to help automate it's use in either batch files or from the command prompt. Listed below are some of the options, please note the some of the functions are operating system specific.


* regedit.exe [options] [filename] [regpath]
* [filename] Import .reg file into the registry
* /s [filename] Silent import, i.e. hide confirmation box when importing files
* /e [filename] [regpath] Export the registry to [filename] starting at [regpath]
e.g. regedit /e file.reg HKEY_USERS\.DEFAULT
* /L:system Specify the location of the system.dat to use
* /R:user Specify the location of the user.dat to use
* /C [filename] Compress (Windows 98)
* /D [regpath] Delete the specified key (Windows 98)

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1 Answer

uimain exe


If you have sufficient computer expertise to deal with superior PC problems, you may consider repairing registry problems simply through built- in Registry Editor. Before editing the Windows registry, you need to make a backup for the registry files:
  1. Click Start, and then select Run, and type REGEDIT on the pop- up. Click OK.
  2. In the Registry Editor, select the registry key you need to back up.
  3. From the Registry menu, select Export Registry File option.
  4. From the Save In list, click the folder where you want to save the backup.
  5. In the File Name box, type a name for your backup file, such as "Options" or "Backup."
  6. In the Export Range box, be sure to select "Selected branch" option.
  7. Click Save. The file is saved with a .reg extension.

Once finishing backing up the registry files, you are allowed to edit the registry manually:
  1. Click Start, and then go to Run.
  2. Type "regedit" onto the dialog box, and then press Enterto enable Registry Editor.
  3. Find out HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE folder and double click to open it. Then click "Software" folder, go to "Microsoft" folder, select "Windows" folder, click"Currentversion" Folder.
  4. Click "Run" folder ==> Click on the UIMain.exe file.
  5. Click Delete UIMain.exe key to remove the file.

Jul 16, 2013 | Computers & Internet

1 Answer

wat does regedit means


regedit is an an inbuilt Microsoft Registry Editor. To start the regedit.exe go to Start>>>Run>>> type regedit and click OK. The Microsoft Registry Editor (regedit.exe) enables you to view, search for, and change settings in your system registry, which contains information about how your computer runs. Although you can use Registry Editor to inspect and modify the registry, doing so is not recommended, because making any incorrect changes can damage your operating system. Please go to http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Windows_Registry for more details.

Mar 22, 2012 | Acer Computers & Internet

5 Answers

my system restore has been turned off by a group policy "whatever that means"


Resolution 1. Click Start, Run and type regedit.exe and press Enter
2. Navigate to the following key:
HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE \ Software \ Policies \ Microsoft \ Windows NT \ SystemRestore
In the right-pane:
  • Delete the value DisableConfig
  • Delete the value DisableSR
3. Exit the Registry Editor.
In Windows XP Professional, you can accomplish the above using Group Policy Editor as well.
1. Click Start, Run and type GPEDIT.MSC
2. Navigate to this path:
-> Computer Configuration
--> Administrative Templates
---> System
----> System Restore
3. Set Turn off System Restore to Not Configured
4. Set Turn off Configuration to Not Configured




For standalone Windows Vista systems, use these steps:
Using the Group Policy Editor
If your edition of Windows Vista includes the Group Policy Editor snap-in (gpedit.msc), follow these steps:
1. Click Start, type gpedit.msc and press ENTER
2. Go to the following branch:
Computer Configuration | Administrative Templates | System | System Restore 3. Double-click Turn off Configuration and set it to Not configured.
Note: If the above setting is already set to Not configured, set it to Enabled and click Apply. Then revert back the setting to Not configured, and click Apply, OK.
4. Exit the Group Policy Editor.
Using the Registry Editor
1. Click Start, type regedit.exe and press ENTER
2. Navigate to the following key:
HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE \ Software \ Policies \ Microsoft \ Windows NT \ SystemRestore 3. In the right-pane, delete the value named DisableConfig
4. Exit the Registry Editor.

If you set the Turn of configuration option to Enabled, the option to configure System Restore on the Configuration Interface disappears. If the Turn off Configuration setting is disabled, the configuration interface is still visible, but all System Restore configuration defaults are enforced, and the Create button is grayed out. If you set it to Not configured, the configuration interface for System Restore remains, and the user has the ability to configure System Restore.


regards
iversh

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Aug 30, 2009 | HP Compaq Presario SR2013WM (RE468AA#ABA)...

1 Answer

system's registry


The system's registry editor can be found on Windows XP by clicking on the start menu and selecting 'Run' and type 'regedit' and press on enter. The system registry editor should launch. On windows Vista, you just click on the Pearl (Start) and on the Start Search box, type 'regedit' and then enter.

For the CD/DVD drive problems that requires registry editing information, you can find the instructions on this link http://support.microsoft.com/kb/929461

Sep 09, 2008 | Pioneer DVR-107D DVD±RW Burner

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