Tip & How-To about Omega Speedmaster Day Date 3520.50.00 Wrist Watch

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How old is a fishing reel make pezon Michel model number 3L.A


Perhaps you try google? we try to help people with questions. This one ended up in the category Watches. I'm sure the technical people who come here to help, know little about fishing gear, let alone how old the stuff is.

Jun 04, 2014 | Watches

1 Answer

My fosil Blue AM3520 watch is not working,I just replaced the battery


you should probably take it to BHam watch repair... also here's a little bit of advice. Do you know where some watch repair shops are in your town or city, cause if you do. you could take it there and let them repair it for you.if all else fails, you just might have to buy another one, sorry. this is the best solution i have for you. if you have any more problems I'll gladly help you.

Jun 09, 2012 | Watches

1 Answer

How do I set the time on an old Regina pocket watch. I can wind it and it runs well. The piece to wind the watch does not pull in or out to set the hands.


If you can wind your pocket watch using the crown, but you cannot see any way of setting the watch, you probably have a "lever-set" movement, though it's possible you might also have a "pin-set" movement. Do you see a little button you can push in, either at 1-2:00 or 10-11:00 on the watch case? If you, you have a pin set watch. Push and hold that little button in while you twist the winding crown, and that will let you set the time. End of problem.

Setting the time on a lever-set watch is a bit more complicated and will require taking off the front bezel of your pocket watch--the metal ring that holds the watch crystal in place. Pocket watch cases of this time are usually made in 3 pieces: the bezel, the main case body, and the back. The procedure used to remove your bezel depends on the type of watch case you have.

Take a close look at the front of your pocket watch. Do you see any hinges at the bottom (that is, below 6:00 and where the bezel meets the main case body)? I suspect that you won't, as double-hinged cases are usually associated with an older style of pocket watch, but it's worth checking. If you do see little hinges for the FRONT (it's more likely that the back will be hinged), then look for a little lip on the bezel that's used to pry open the front. Pull on that to open the case.

If you don't see hinges, which is what I expect, your front bezel unscrews. You can try to do this with your bare hands, but it's a lot easier if you have a bit of "gripping" rubber so your hands don't slip so badly. I have a small rectangle of shelf non-slip stuff that works perfectly for this. Turn the bezel counterclockwise. It may resist a little bit at first due to accumulated dirt, but then it should easily screw off.

Once you have the bezel away from the face, look closely at about 2:00 on the watch dial. Just at the edge of the dial, you should see a little lever or button. GENTLY pull this away from the watch face until it stops. Now, when you turn the winding crown, you should be able to set the time. Once the time is set, gently push the lever back to its prior position. Now, you should be able to wind the watch without changing the time.

Be very careful when screwing the bezel back onto the watch body. These parts typically have very fine threads, and it's easy to cross-thread the pieces. Don't force the two pieces together; once the threads catch properly, the front bezel will screw on easily without resistance.

An older style of pocket watch required the use of a little key to set the time from the back of the pocket watch movement. However, these watches were also wound by the same key, so the fact that you're able to wind this watch with a crown suggests to me that your watch doesn't use this system.

May 27, 2011 | Watches

1 Answer

Just had the battery replaced on my Wenger Swiss Army watch Model : 7987X/T. The red second needle is no longer moving.. its stuck on the 30 min mark. Watch works fine otherwise. Could not find any info on this in the manual. any ideas on how it cna get it to start moving ?


If the second hand of your watch isn't moving, but the watch is otherwise keeping time, you most likely have one of two problems. The simpler to fix problem is that the second hand might have come loose from the post onto which it's been fitted. It's a simple friction fit, and a watch technician would simply remove the watch movement from the case and very (very!) gently push down on the seconds hand to re-seat it. If that's the problem, that's all there is to the repair.

A second potential cause for this behavior could be that a speck of dust or crud has gotten into the gears that operate the seconds hand, preventing it from moving. This can easily happen when changing a battery--many watches tend to get somewhat of a buildup of crud where the watch back meets the case. Especially with screw back cases, the process of loosening the back also loosens the crud layer, making it easy for little bits to fall in. If you do have crud in your movement, you're a bit limited in what you can do. Unlike old-time mechanical movements, very few quartz movements are made to be disassembled and cleaned. Instead, a watch repairer may be able to blow some air (not compressed air from a can--that will probably wreck your movement) to try to clear the gears. If that doesn't work, there is a little device that some watchmakers have that runs your watch at about 50 time as fast as normal. Spinning the gears like that can sometimes generate enough force to clear a blocked gear train. I have done this to resurrect several watches whose hands were stuck. However, I was still able to see the "pulse" of the second hand on those watches, even if the hand itself never moved forward.

May 16, 2011 | Watches

1 Answer

I'm trying to take apart this reel in order to clean and oil it. However I'm not able to remove the handles or the spool. Ideas?


Unless you know exacly what you are doing don't bother. It is a very complicated reel and expremely easy to put back together incorrecly. Send it off to Daiwa Sports service department. It'll either cost you £5 or nothing to have it serviced.
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E: info@daiwasports.co.uk


Apr 19, 2009 | Watches

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