Tip & How-To about Heating & Cooling

How to heat a garage or workshop



Two things to consider in buying a space heater - the require BTU and the electricla cost to heat your space.


You can go here to calculate your estimated BTU need - http://www.calculator.net/btu-calculator.html
or just look up "BTU calculator' on line and there are other BTU calculators as well.

The BTU is what is pretty much required to effectively and efficiently heat to the temperature range you are comfortable with. It's a matter of the maximum degrees you want to raise the temperature. In my case I wanted to be able to increase the ambient temperature in my woodworking workshop from 40 degrees to 65 degrees and I have less than favorable insulation in this workshop, so my desired BTU is 16,359 at 4,794 watts. This heater meets that demand quite nicely.

As for cost, as I mention in the video (link above) the two ceramic space heaters were costing me about $1.56 per evening to heat my workshop. This heater is costing me only about 92 cents for the same length of time. I have immediate savings of over 62 cents per evening of use! Why the huge difference? Because the other two space heaters had to run continuously at combined 3,000 watts for 2 hours to heat the space and then continuously to maintain the desired temperature. The Dr Heater DR966 bring s my workshop from 40 to 60-65 degree in a half hour at 6,000 watts and then only runs intermittently at 3,000 watts to maintain that temperature. Therefore I am using less electricity to heat my shop to 65 degrees and to maintain that temperature.

I have my heater connected to a 30amp circuit breaker and have had no issues with the electrical demand of the heater tripping the breaker. But I am also using a six-foot long 6-gauge cord from the heater to the outlet and 8-gauge wire from the outlet to the breaker and the outlet is mounted directly underneath the sub-panel, so there virtually no distance from the breaker to the six-foot cord.

If the BTU supply of this heater meets your BTU demands I recommend that you get this heater and see for yourself what it's like to have a well heated work space. It's nice!
Here's a link to view the heater I used.

http://astore.amazon.com/wwwdogwoodtal-20

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how do you calculate how much free air is required for a 50,000 btu wall heater


Calculate the Cubic Footage of the area to be heated (i,e. Total confined space square footage x ceiling height = Cubic Footage). So let's say the total cubic footage is 3.808. To be considered unconfined space in this example, the total maximum aggregate input rating of all gas-fired appliances installed in the 3,808 cu. ft. space must not exceed 76,160 BTU per hour; (3,808 divided by 50) x 1,000 equals 76,160 BTU per hour.

Normal air infiltration into a confined space will be adequate to supply the necessary fresh air for proper combustion and ventilation if the building is not constructed unusually tight. If it is tightly constructed, some type of fresh air intake should be installed. Being that this 50,000 Btu wall heater is required to be vented to the outside, you can figure that up to 20 to 25% of the heat produced is going up the stack or chimney. That leaves you with a total of 37,500 Btu's dedicated to heating the building.

Placement of the wall heater can be critical in even heat distribution. Of course, it will always be warmer closer to the heater.

I hope this helped answer your question. Thanks for choosing FixYa.

Aug 12, 2011 | Fedders Heating & Cooling

1 Answer

I am looking for basic information regarding forced air space heaters. When the specs indicate "will heat xxxxx sq. Ft space, what does that actually mean? A "Space" is often measured in Cubic Feet vs. Square Feet. What is the standard third ingredient (e.g. height)? What is the standard temparature the "space" is heated to in the specs? I do not own a space heater at this time.


The basic method that i've used for years is using square feet of floor space. There are all sorts of multipliers in different calculations dependent on number of windows, type of insulation, numberof doors to exterior, area of the country you live in and number of people in your house.
We live in north central Kansas and it gets plenty cold and hot here. I figure 1 ton of cooling for each 500square feet of space and 40,000 B.T.U. s for heating. This is just a quick way to figure and around here it works pretty well.
I always thought it was better to err on the side of a little more is better then a liitle less.
Hope this helps you some. Thanks

Dec 07, 2010 | Heating & Cooling

1 Answer

Electricity cost per hour


1500w / 1000w = 1.5 kwh. Every hour you run (assuming it is at 100% peak power) you use 1.5 kw. Just multiply that rate by how much it your power company charges per kwh.

Estimating high at 10 cents per kwh it would be $1 for every 10 hours you run the heater, or $2.40 per day, or about $72 per month if you ran it 24/7 for 30 days.

It is FAR cheaper to use these types heaters to heat one small room than an entire apartment or house if you are only in one room the majority of the time.

Dec 12, 2008 | Lasko Ceramic Heater

2 Answers

holmes bh3955 or holmes hh3690


figure out your square foot requirements - multiply 16 X 20 to get 320 sq ft. Find a heat formula to consider windows and doors and known insulation in the walls. this will give you BTu output required to raise the inside air from 68 degrees (norm) to 72 degrees.

Dec 06, 2007 | Holmes Products BH3955-U Bionaire Utility...

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