Tip & How-To about Yamaha Electric Guitar

Keep from warping the neck

A warp neck is the most common cause of poor playability. A bow in the neck changes the action and even sometimes the intonation. This can cost quit a few bucks at the shop. The cause is a lack of humidity. the instrument drys out and causes a curling effect in the wood. Any wood instrument needs moisture .Its the nature of wood . Prevention: place a humidifier in your gtr. case. { get one at local gtr. shop]Take your gtr. it to the shower with you . [ not under the water of corse], let it **** up some steam now and then. if you live in a very dry climate beware . Northan areas where it humid most of the time you don;t have to be so concerned. This will save you a lot of repair cost. Keep on playing in the free world. DFD

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How do I lower my strings closer to the fretboard


There are a few different ways to do this, and unfortunately if you have not done this kind of work before you could end up damaging the guitar more than fixing it.
A few things to look for:
Sight down the neck from the top of the guitar looking down along the edges. If you see a concave (banana shaped) bow in the neck, it needs adjustment. Almost all guitars including yours have a neck adjustment rod that can alleviate some of the bow. If however the neck is convex ( higher in the middle) the neck would need adjustment too. You want a very slight bow in the neck to allow for weather changes as wood expands and contracts with the weather.
Other adjustments are down on the bridge. There are usually very small allen or hex key adjustments for each string to raise and lower the action (height) of the string. Again, any adjustments here can also affect the tuning of the string up and down the neck (intonation). The guitar may not end up being tuned at one place one the neck while in tune on another.
I would highly recommend taking this to a music store with a qualified person to adjust it. Many times the action can be lowered and the string height adjusted for better playing ability. You can inform the technician now what you see and what you want done. Also let them know if you have a heavy or light touch on the strings as this can make a difference when they adjust it too. At the same time a lot of them also restring your guitar for you and you may request a lighter gauge of string allowing for better play too. Good luck.

Feb 21, 2011 | B.C. Rich BC Rich Kerry King Wartribe 7...

1 Answer

high action even though neck is straight. I have also messed with the bridge saddles and not much has changed except it gives fret buzz when i lower the saddles just a little bit. Is high action a common issue with the Ibanez ATK300?


Sounds like you need to get it intonated. Take it to your local guitar shop tell them your problem and where you'd like your strings to sit or that straight neck of yours won't be like that for long.
Good Luck, Cody J

Dec 14, 2010 | Ibanez ATK300 Electric Bass

1 Answer

I bought a Hagstrom Ultra Swede which sounded very nice when I first bought it but after 3 months I seem to have alot of tuning problems with it. It has been intonated twice and a new set of heavier strings (10s) but still sounds off. There is cracking in the neck all up and down the fret board. The dealer says that's not uncommon. Should I push for a replacement?


Considerations:

1. Intonation problems can be due to worn strings even if the guitar is set up properly. New Strings can fix this. This is the most common problem.

2. Also, changing string size may effect your set up too. Typically, new guitars come with lighter strings such as (9's) which the guitar is set up for. The positive is that 9's fret easily. The negative is that they bend too easily for some players who either slightly bend them when chording (accidentally), or press too hard on guitars with jumbo sized frets, which in turn bends the string toward the fret board causing detuning. To fix these items folks may suggest you get a heavier string like a (10), but the problem can often be solved by playing with a lighter hand, pressing only enough to make contact with the fret and not pressing the string all the way to the fretboard. Check your intonation using this light touch method and see if it's okay verses pressing the string all the way to the fretboard. If the intonation is okay with the light touch, the guitar intonation is set up properly. You may want to consider playing with a lighter hand or getting a guitar without jumbo frets such as Fender strats etc...

Putting a heavier string on a guitar set up for (9's) would likely cause the buzzing that wasn't there before. In this case you'd need the guitar and neck set up again to accomodate the 10's. So decide what size string you want and set the guitar up for that size.

These considerations are true for any electric guitars.

After consideration of all of the above, you still feel it's the guitar, I suggest you push for a replacement or perhaps credit toward another guitar.

Oct 18, 2010 | Hagstrom Swede Electric Guitar Natural...

3 Answers

buzzing of strings in frets up to fifth fret; seems that the bridge may be low but it's not. Also, too there is more gain in high strings than the fifth and sixth


Sounds like a warped neck, if the bridge isn't low what else would cause the strings to buzz.? With the gain problem perhaps the neck is twisted as
well as bowed. Epiphone are proving to be quite popular but they are built to a price and for beginners they are usually a good choice. Unfortunately some fakes of different guitars are sold on ebay and they often make better tennis rackets than a musical instrument. Unless you changed them the guitar usually has a cheaper Humbucker pickup. Check it's fitting anf make sure there are no loose parts or wiring sitting against the soundboard on the inside.

Try looking down the neck of the guitar and seeif you notice any warp or bend. Overtightening the strings can cause the opposite warp and the strings end up further from the frets. Also try some measuring. The distance between the any string and the fretboard starting at the nut and working down to the bottom of the fretboard. These measurements should be consistant
Also, check the nut to see if the grooves aren't too deep. This could cause buzzing by allowing less distance between the string and the first fret.

Make sure all the frets are seated correctly and not slightly out of kilter at one end.

That should give you enough to keep you busy for a while. There are plenty of reasoins why a string will buzz. I've covered a few mecanical ones but without sounding rude there are also player caused buzz. Depressing the string too far behind the fret can cause it whereas too close to the fret can kill the note. But that's not my field in this situation. Check all the above and then try your fingering. One way or the other that buzz will stop. The best way to check if it's you is to get someone else to try your guitar out and see if the buzz buzzes off :-)

good luck

Apr 07, 2010 | Epiphone Les Paul 100 Electric Guitar

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