20 Most Recent Whirlpool RBS275PD Electric Single Oven - Page 2 Questions & Answers


If the timer feature is activating and you have not touched the timer button at all, this would have to be a failed Electronic Oven Control. The timer button is either shorting at times or closing on its own from heat or moisture. The Electronic Oven Control would need to be replaced to repair the problem.

Or Why does it take the oven so long to bake?
When the food is taking way too long to bake, it's probably a weak bake ignitor. Replacing the ignitor usually fixes this problem, but you probably want to verify that the ignitor is the problem before replacing it.

Sometimes the oven thermostat or oven sensor can be calibrated wrong, or it may be faulty. If your particular range has an oven that uses an electronic thermostat, and the oven temperature is off by tens of degrees, you probably have to replace it.
On most units that have a mechanical thermostat, you can actually remove the thermostat knob, and adjust the knob to more accurately represent the actual setting of the thermostat. On many models, there's a screw on the back of the knob with a small calibration plate or ring. You can loosen this screw and adjust the calibration plate. Remember to tighten the screw again. If yours isn't adjustable, and the temperature is off by a large amount, you should just replace the thermostat.

Or Oven safety valve needs to be checked with multi meter ohms / voltage

ALSO Test the Burner Heating Element
The stove's burner heating element is a coil of metal sheathed in an insulator. Electrical current travels through the element. Resistance to the passing of electrical current causes the element to heat up. A precise temperature cannot be set for a burner, instead it is turned on and off repeatedly by the control to the achieve an average temperature. When it is set to a low temperature, the element is cycled on and off more frequently. For high temperatures, the heating element is energized longer with fewer on and off cycles. Some burners have two elements, with the second only being used only for high heat settings.
Before testing the heating element, unplug the appliance or shut off the power at thefuseboxorbreaker panelto avoid an electrical shock hazard.
When a burner does not heat at all, or only heats up to a lower than expected temperature, the problem is likely to be with the heating element, the temperature control switch, or the wiring. If it only heats at the highest temperature, the problem is with the control or an electrical short, not the burner. If the burner works only intermittently, the problem is likely in the wiring or connectors. To test the heating element, try the following steps.
First, disconnect the heating element from the stovetop. In most cases, this is done by lifting up the burner on the side opposite of the terminals (the part of the burner that disappears under the stovetop). Remove the decorative ring.
Inspect the style of connection. If the burner element has visible blades that fit into the receptacle block, pinch the block with one hand, and pull the heating element free with your other hand. If the terminal block clamps over the element, the housing must be removed and the burner wires disconnected. Unsnap the metal piece or remove the screw that secures the receptacle block and then disconnect the element.
Inspect the heating element. If you find bubbles, warping, or damage to the insulation sheath, the burner must be replaced. If the terminals are dirty or corroded, this can cause poor temperature control, intermittent problems or complete failure to heat. Clean the terminals with steel wool or very fine sand paper to restore good conductivity.
Test theresistanceof the heating element using amulti meter. Set the multi meter to the ohms setting X1 and touch one probe to each of the terminals. A normal reading is typically somewhere between 20 and 120 ohms. The exact reading differs by manufacturer and mode. If the meter reads infinite resistance or the other extreme of the scale, zero resistance, then the element is damaged and should be replaced. If the measured resistance differs significantly from the expected range, the element is probably bad, but if possible, determine from the manufacturer what the actual resistance should be.
To test for a grounded or shorted element, touch one probe to the surface of the burner and the other probe to each terminal in turn. If you get continuity at any time, the heating element is defective and should be replaced.
The reason for my free advice is GOD is good!

Whirlpool... | Answered on Jan 03, 2017


need more info model # try shutting off power it should reset itself
or you have control problem replace

Whirlpool... | Answered on Jan 02, 2017


As a general rule of thumb, oven door glass assemblies are not intended to be removed for "cleaning" or some such procedure. Go to www.repairclinic.com and enter RBS275PDB8. You will be presented with a list of common replacement parts and may be able to view a generic Whirlpool oven disassembly video which may help.

Whirlpool... | Answered on Aug 16, 2016


1.Power cord damage?Damaged rubber with wires showing through or the wire is being pinched can cause issues. Electrical tape is acceptable for covering damaged wires.
2.Aclicking sound could be something wrong with a relay. Check for any loose connections around the main control board on your oven. The click you hear is a relay losing power and switching back on. If the clock resets then something is causing power interruptions to the board.
3.
4.Even a bad relay door switch will hinder your oven from operating.

If your oven has internal fuses, a wiring or component problem could have caused a fuse to blow. A blown fuse is an indication that a component has shorted or failed, and the problem will need to be corrected. Most ovens that use fuses will have an indication of the circuits that are affected by a particular fuse. If an oven fuse has blown, then you should inspect the oven element and the associated wiring to determine the cause before replacing the fuse.

THINGS TO CHECK:

the broil element
is the heating element that is found at the top of the oven and produces a very high heat for broiling. If the broil element isn't working, you should first do a visual inspection for signs that the element has blistered or separated. If the element appears normal then you can check for continuity with a multi-meter. Remove power from the appliance before performing this test. Remove the back panel and locate the terminals for the broil element and inspect the terminals and wires for signs of overheating or damage.

If there is no continuity then the element will need to be replaced. If the wires are damaged then they will need to be repaired. If the element is ok then you will need to check the broil circuit to determine the cause. This involves live voltage checks and should only be performed by qualified persons. Components to check include fuses, if the range is equipped, and oven control thermostat or electronic control. Depending on the manufacturer of the element, you will normally read between 19 ohms and 115 ohms


The bake element
is the heating element that is found at the bottom of the oven. Most electric ovens use both the bake element and the broil element in a bake cycle, with the bake element performing 90% of the heating. If the bake element isn't working, the oven may not heat. To help determine if the bake element is defective you should first do a visual check. If the element is blistered or separated then it should be replaced. If the element appears to look normal, then turn the oven on to a bake function for a minute and then turn it off.

Check the element for signs of heating and if it is still cold then it may be defective. Disconnect the power and then remove the back panel. First check the wires as they may have become loose or corroded. If the element appears to be fine visually, test it for continuity with a multi-meter. ( by placing the each of the meter prongs on each end of the heater element connectors) If the element is burned or no longer has continuity, it will need to be replaced. Depending on the manufacturer of the element, you will normally read between 19 ohms and 115 ohms

The oven safety valve
(also called the gas valve) is the part that ensures that gas is not released until the igniter has reached the correct temperature needed to ignite the gas. While this part can fail, it is uncommon. If the hot surface igniter does not glow you should first verify that you have voltage to the circuit. This is a live voltage check and should be performed by a qualified person. If voltage is lost at the valve terminals then you should verify the continuity of the bi-metal in the valve using a multi-meter.
I offer free advice bcuz God is so good!


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Whirlpool... | Answered on May 18, 2015


did u by any change do any work inside that may have reversed the wiring? other wise check the oven relay board and the wiring behind the bake broil switch

Whirlpool... | Answered on May 18, 2015


F2-E6 - Cancel Key Line Open - Check the connection between the touch pad (keypad) and control board (clock) to make sure it is secure.
Select the 'cancel' function and wait 60 seconds.
If error code reappears then replace the touch pad, or touch pad and control board (clock) if all one assembly.


Thanks for using FixYa - a 4 THUMBS rating is appreciated for answering your FREE question

Whirlpool... | Answered on Apr 24, 2015


You may have somehow shorted the circuit by leaving a loose wire not connected tight enough or it came loose and grounded against another wire? worse yet u misconnected the wrong wires incorrectly? lastly both ur ovens work on the same voltage? 220 vrs 110

Whirlpool... | Answered on Apr 22, 2015


Had same problem with my KitchenAid. 10 years old. Ran self cleaning cycle, oven died!!!! Called repair. Appears to be thermal fuse. Part on order. Microcomputer had some brown spots on it. Tey wanted us to replace it too. But will wait to see if fuse is problem. Repair - $150 vs. $570. If it's the higher price, we'll buy a new oven before putting that kind of money into it. Will NEVER run a clean cycle again even if I have to buy a new oven.

Whirlpool... | Answered on Apr 10, 2015


USUALLY INSIDE OVEN ALONG BACK WALL AT TOP LEFT CORNER

Whirlpool... | Answered on Apr 09, 2015


Oven comes on and off intermittently or heats very little:
If the timer feature is activating and you have not touched the timer button at all, this would have to be a failed Electronic Oven Control. The timer button is either shorting at times or closing on its own from heat or moisture. The Electronic Oven Control would need to be replaced to repair the problem.

Or Why does it take the oven so long to bake?
When the food is taking way too long to bake, it's probably a weak bake ignitor. Replacing the ignitor usually fixes this problem, but you probably want to verify that the ignitor is the problem before replacing it.

Sometimes the oven thermostat or oven sensor can be calibrated wrong, or it may be faulty. If your particular range has an oven that uses an electronic thermostat, and the oven temperature is off by tens of degrees, you probably have to replace it.
On most units that have a mechanical thermostat, you can actually remove the thermostat knob, and adjust the knob to more accurately represent the actual setting of the thermostat. On many models, there's a screw on the back of the knob with a small calibration plate or ring. You can loosen this screw and adjust the calibration plate. Remember to tighten the screw again. If yours isn't adjustable, and the temperature is off by a large amount, you should just replace the thermostat.

Or Oven safety valve needs to be checked with multi meter ohms / voltage
ALSO Test the Burner Heating Element The stove's burner heating element is a coil of metal sheathed in an insulator. Electrical current travels through the element. Resistance to the passing of electrical current causes the element to heat up. A precise temperature cannot be set for a burner, instead it is turned on and off repeatedly by the control to the achieve an average temperature. When it is set to a low temperature, the element is cycled on and off more frequently. For high temperatures, the heating element is energized longer with fewer on and off cycles. Some burners have two elements, with the second only being used only for high heat settings.
Before testing the heating element, unplug the appliance or shut off the power at thefuseboxorbreaker panelto avoid an electrical shock hazard.
When a burner does not heat at all, or only heats up to a lower than expected temperature, the problem is likely to be with the heating element, the temperature control switch, or the wiring. If it only heats at the highest temperature, the problem is with the control or an electrical short, not the burner. If the burner works only intermittently, the problem is likely in the wiring or connectors. To test the heating element, try the following steps.
First, disconnect the heating element from the stovetop. In most cases, this is done by lifting up the burner on the side opposite of the terminals (the part of the burner that disappears under the stovetop). Remove the decorative ring.
Inspect the style of connection. If the burner element has visible blades that fit into the receptacle block, pinch the block with one hand, and pull the heating element free with your other hand. If the terminal block clamps over the element, the housing must be removed and the burner wires disconnected. Unsnap the metal piece or remove the screw that secures the receptacle block and then disconnect the element.
Inspect the heating element. If you find bubbles, warping, or damage to the insulation sheath, the burner must be replaced. If the terminals are dirty or corroded, this can cause poor temperature control, intermittent problems or complete failure to heat. Clean the terminals with steel wool or very fine sand paper to restore good conductivity.
Test theresistanceof the heating element using amulti meter. Set the multi meter to the ohms setting X1 and touch one probe to each of the terminals. A normal reading is typically somewhere between 20 and 120 ohms. The exact reading differs by manufacturer and mode. If the meter reads infinite resistance or the other extreme of the scale, zero resistance, then the element is damaged and should be replaced. If the measured resistance differs significantly from the expected range, the element is probably bad, but if possible, determine from the manufacturer what the actual resistance should be.
To test for a grounded or shorted element, touch one probe to the surface of the burner and the other probe to each terminal in turn. If you get continuity at any time, the heating element is defective and should be replaced.

Whirlpool... | Answered on Apr 09, 2015


Nothing Works, or the Oven / Range / Stovetop Works Only At Certain Times:

1.Home breaker flipped or the fuse blown?Possibly an electrical surge has flipped the breaker. Check your breaker or fuse box and replace or reset as necessary.
2.Power cord plugged in?Grab the plug and wiggle to determine a good connection.
3.Power cord damage?Damaged rubber with wires showing through or the wire is being pinched can cause issues. Electrical tape is acceptable for covering damaged wires.
4.Aclicking sound could be something wrong with a relay. Check for any loose connections around the main control board on your oven. The click you hear is a relay losing power and switching back on. If the clock resets then something is causing power interruptions to the board.

If your oven has internal fuses, a wiring or component problem could have caused a fuse to blow. A blown fuse is an indication that a component has shorted or failed, and the problem will need to be corrected. Most ovens that use fuses will have an indication of the circuits that are affected by a particular fuse. If an oven fuse has blown, then you should inspect the oven element and the associated wiring to determine the cause before replacing the fuse.

THINGS TO CHECK:

the broil element
is the heating element that is found at the top of the oven and produces a very high heat for broiling. If the broil element isn't working, you should first do a visual inspection for signs that the element has blistered or separated. If the element appears normal then you can check for continuity with a multi-meter. Remove power from the appliance before performing this test. Remove the back panel and locate the terminals for the broil element and inspect the terminals and wires for signs of overheating or damage.

If there is no continuity then the element will need to be replaced. If the wires are damaged then they will need to be repaired. If the element is ok then you will need to check the broil circuit to determine the cause. This involves live voltage checks and should only be performed by qualified persons. Components to check include fuses, if the range is equipped, and oven control thermostat or electronic control.


The bake element
is the heating element that is found at the bottom of the oven. Most electric ovens use both the bake element and the broil element in a bake cycle, with the bake element performing 90% of the heating. If the bake element isn't working, the oven may not heat. To help determine if the bake element is defective you should first do a visual check. If the element is blistered or separated then it should be replaced. If the element appears to look normal, then turn the oven on to a bake function for a minute and then turn it off.

Check the element for signs of heating and if it is still cold then it may be defective. Disconnect the power and then remove the back panel. First check the wires as they may have become loose or corroded. If the element appears to be fine visually, test it for continuity with a multi-meter. If the element is burned or no longer has continuity, it will need to be replaced.

Surface burners
are typically either a coil type, solid type or a ribbon coil as used in smooth top ranges. All of these consist of a heating wire that uses electric current to produce heat. Coil type elements can be checked for continuity by removing them from the terminal block and testing them with a multi-meter.

You should also inspect the terminal ends for signs of heat damage or corrosion, and if present, you should replace the terminal block or receptacle at the same time. You will need to remove power from the range to change the terminal block. Solid elements and smooth top elements require raising or removing the main top to gain access. You will need to remove power from the range before lifting the main top. Continuity can then be checked with a multi-meter, once you have removed the wires from the element terminals.

On modern electronic control ranges, the oven temperature sensor
is the part that regulates the oven temperature. If it is not working properly it could be the reason why the range or oven won't start. This part can be found inside the oven on the rear wall near the top. Most modern ovens will display a fault code if the oven sensor is at fault. If you think the sensor may be the issue you can check the resistance with a multi-meter but will need to know the correct resistance of the sensor at room temperature. Remove power from the appliance before performing this test.

The infinite switch
on the control panel controls the power to each surface element. If you have no heat at an element and the element and terminal block check ok, then you may have a defective infinite switch. Disconnect power to the range and remove the console back panel. Locate the switch and check for overheated wires or faulty terminals first. Test the switch's contacts for continuity with a multi-meter. If defective, replace the switch.
If the infinite switch does not appear to be defective, then you should check for proper voltage to the switch. This is a live high voltage test and should only be performed by qualified persons.

Most modern ovens use an electronic control board
to control the oven functions. These models will use the control board to operate the oven safety valve on a gas range or oven, and the bake and broil elements on an electric range or oven. If there is no power to the igniter circuit, or the element circuits, then you should check the control board to verify that there is power at the appropriate output relay. These are live voltage checks and should be performed by qualified persons only. If there is no output voltage then the control should be replaced.

The oven safety valve
(also called the gas valve) is the part that ensures that gas is not released until the igniter has reached the correct temperature needed to ignite the gas. While this part can fail, it is uncommon. If the hot surface igniter does not glow you should first verify that you have voltage to the circuit. This is a live voltage check and should be performed by a qualified person. If voltage is lost at the valve terminals then you should verify the continuity of the bi-metal in the valve using a multi-meter.

The oven burner igniter
commonly known as the hot surface igniter is used in modern gas oven burners to open the gas valve and to ignite the gas. As the igniter draws electric current it will heat to a high temperature and glow, as well as cause the bi-metal in the oven safety valve to warp and open the valve releasing the gas to be ignited. This sequence normally takes about a minute. Igniters come in both flat and round styles and are very fragile. If the burner does not light then you should check the igniter first. If the igniter does not glow at all, then check for power to the circuit. This is a live voltage check and should be performed by a qualified person. If power is present then the igniter may be open circuit and can be checked for continuity with a multi-meter. If the igniter is glowing, but the burner is not lighting, the igniter may be weak and still be at fault because it requires a certain amount of current draw to open the valve. This check requires the use of an amp meter and should be performed by a qualified person. If the igniter is defective then it must be replaced.

Whirlpool... | Answered on Apr 09, 2015


Hi,
If your electric oven is taking too long to heat or just not heating up right,then check out this tip that will give more detail about your problem.

Oven Problems Electric Oven is Heating Slowly or Poorly

heatman101

Whirlpool... | Answered on Apr 02, 2015


The upper element is for broiling and should not come on until you tell it broil. If it is coming on as soon as you turn on the breaker then it sounds like the printed circuit control board is bad. There is a relay on the board that engages when you program in the broiler. The relay can be hard to find and may not be removable. My broiler would come on when I programmed in the bake mode, go into runaway heat, put up a F10 code, and shut off. I could not clear it until I programmed in the clean mode for 2 hours. Now it works great.

Whirlpool... | Answered on Nov 12, 2014


Things to check- The screw in fuses, they are usually the 30 amp fuses for the oven. Next is the clock assembly, often these clocks will have the words "push for manual" or "turn for manual", this will put the clock back into the normal operating mode rather than the automatic mode. Next, you may have to remove the power and check for any burnt wires. If all checks ok, you will have to test the selector switch and oven control.
 Oven temp problems: Temperature is too low possible trouble makers, blown oven fuse, bake element is out, burnt wire, oven probe clips, oven temp control, oven temp sensor.
Temperature is too high in the oven possible trouble makers, oven temp control, oven relay ( if used ), oven probe clips, oven temp sensor, shorted wire.
These oven probe clips often rust off and the oven temp probe hangs down, or touches the oven wall giving false temperature readings to the oven control.

Whirlpool... | Answered on Oct 11, 2014


This is not a good code and usually means the electronic control will need replacing. Try disconnecting the power for a couple minutes and if the error comes back, the control is bad and will need replacing.

Whirlpool... | Answered on Sep 28, 2014


It's very probably printed on a label on the back panel, Amber.

Whirlpool... | Answered on Aug 04, 2014

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