20 Most Recent Princeton Digital VL1916 19" LCD Monitor Questions & Answers


Cheaper to replace than repair.

Princeton... | Answered on Mar 01, 2018


It appears that the monitor was designed to work with the display circuits and software driver on a Personal Computer. There is no circuitry in the display to handle the out put of DVD player. A smart TV has the circuitry. the display does not.

Princeton... | Answered on Nov 26, 2017


Doreen, try going into display settings and make changes there, veiw changes if you find better choose ti.

Princeton... | Answered on Feb 22, 2016


Did you turn on the volume on the monitor????


princeton-monitor-no-sound-555h3fqerr1ym3xtx2oynuua-4-0.jpg

Princeton... | Answered on Mar 20, 2015


Plug your computer into an older model monitor and reset the screen resolution to a higher one. This usually works for me. Hope this helps.

Princeton... | Answered on Oct 31, 2012


Did you try this monitor with another PC and already verify that the VGA cable is OK.
Common problem with Princeton monitors are due to bad DC filter capacitors in the power supply board, see example here:

http://s807.photobucket.com/albums/yy352/budm/PRINCETON/

Princeton... | Answered on Sep 10, 2011


Welcome to Fixya

Sounds like there is a problem with the inverter. To test the issue further, shine a flashlight to the screen once it goes black. Look if yo can see a faint image of the screen. If you see a faint image, then you need to have the inverter replaced.

Thank you for using Fixya!

If you need further help, reach me via phone at https://www.6ya.com/expert/elixirjose_00375ea24bd8141b

Princeton... | Answered on Aug 02, 2011


My VL1919 has been having this issue off and on for a month or so now. It happened three times in one day today, so I decided to do something about it. I opened up the monitor and poked around a bit.
I found three electrolytic capacitors on the backlight inverter board were bulging, two of which had just started to leak: 71706a0.jpg The capacitors were placed directly above and next to a large, flat metal heat sink. I say above with respect to the flow of air due to convection, and next to because the heat sink also wraps around, enclosing the group of capacitors on one side. The heat sink sits flush with the circuit board, turning the board into a front enclosing face. When reassembled, the metal housing sits a fraction of an inch above the sink, forming a back face. This assembly is at the top edge of the circuit board, so the housing then takes a 90° bend to form a top face. These capacitors seem to get almost no air flow... Together with the heat coming off the sink, it appears the engineers have created their own little capacitor oven. Capacitors immediately adjacent to the affected components, but without blocked air flow looked completely normal. Looking at the traces on the circuit board and location of other components, the capacitors could have easily been moved out of the hot spot. This is either an act of gross negligence, or an intentionally created post-warranty failure point, designed to avoid market saturation. But that might be too pessimistic... "Never attribute to malice what can be adequately explained by incompetence." Anyway, I scavenged a few capacitors off an old computer power supply to replace the damaged parts (one 470uF 25V two 1000uF 10V capacitor, both rated to 105°C). To avoid a repeat performance, I soldered some short extension wires to the replacement caps and moved them out to an open area of the board, being careful to give the high voltage components plenty of breathing room. After reassembly, the monitor powered right up and came online. I guess the real question is how long it will stay this way.

Princeton... | Answered on Jul 21, 2011


No but you could always put something under the stand most can only be tilted for lighting reasons.

Princeton... | Answered on Jul 04, 2011


Hi

Open Control Panel>Display>Settings tab>advanced, navigate through the tabs to find a rotate display option.This option has come due to the graphic card you have installed. The option should allow you to rotate the display back to its original orientation.

Cheer

Princeton... | Answered on Jun 23, 2011


Try to decrease your screen resolution. see attach picture: or restart your computer then if windows xp booth press F8 then choose ENABLE VGA MODE. press enter. jimmyverdade_4.jpgjimmyverdade_5.jpgjimmyverdade_6.jpg

Princeton... | Answered on May 27, 2011


That is the problem with the standby section of the power supply. A continuous flashing indicate a shorted component usually a small diode.

Princeton... | Answered on May 24, 2011


Hi, Billman11, maybe you can repair or maybe not. You need to tell me some stuff first. Need the approx age of the display. Next thing! Does the monitor have external power supply? (black box, sit on floor type) or internal (line cord to wall outlet, and other end to monitor) What exactly happens if monitor is connected to afully booted PC with known good vga output and u connect the flat screen lcd and push the power button? Is lcd panel still pitch black? no flicker or anything? Can you see the power on led indicator even?? From waht you already described it sounds like a Switch-Mode-Power-Supply failure. Each lcd monitor has 2 or 3 printed circuits inside under metal shields beneath the black plastic case covers. In your case, we will want to investigate the board that the line cord plugs into. That will be the smps board, or the little black box on the floor. If you want to try fixing this monitor you can get back to me at louie12fix on fixya or lmistyrel@ aol.com Yes, I'm a vet and spent a year on Kanghwa Do, Korea 67-68 Work for company that provides electronic hardware/software to the gaming industry and located northern Illinois. BYE for now.

Princeton... | Answered on Mar 16, 2011


set it from menu, if it cant work adjust if from tv mainboard

Princeton... | Answered on Jan 22, 2011


Please check the caps in the power supply first and learn about bad caps at the links below.
Most common failures in the LCD monitors are bad capacitors (bulging top/seal or leaking) in the power supply, blown fuses, poor solder joints, failed inverter circuits (blown fuse, shorted transistors, shorted/open transformers), bad lamps (poor solder connections or worn out lamps). You will need to open it up and inspect the inside, see example of failed PRINCETON monitors to get some ideas what to look for: http://s807.photobucket.com/home/budm/allalbums
Post back what you see inside so we can guide you further and it will help out other people in the future also.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Capacitor_plague
http://www.badcaps.net

Princeton... | Answered on Jun 21, 2010


Check the caps in the power supply with leaking/bulging top.
Most common failures in the LCD monitors are bad capacitors (bulging top/seal or leaking) in the power supply, blown fuses, failed inverter circuits (blown fuse, shorted transistors, shorted/open transformers), bad lamps (poor solder connections or worn out lamps). You will need to open it up and inspect the inside, see example of failed PRINCETON monitors to get some ideas what to look for: http://s807.photobucket.com/home/budm/allalbums
Post back what you see inside so we can guide you further and it will help out other people in the future also.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Capacitor_plague
http://www.badcaps.net

Princeton... | Answered on Jun 01, 2010


david78910, First disconnect and reconnect the monitors VGA plug from pc vga port a few times to make sure of good connection at the port. Report back here with results! If that doesn't fix your "pink screen" symptom, then possible bad inverter supply inside unit or the CCFL tubes may have lots and lots of "on" hours use on them and need to be replaced. Yes, you could also have bad (almost dead) switch-mode-power-supply inside unit if "known-good" monitor works perfectly with your pc. 12fixlouie

Princeton... | Answered on May 27, 2010

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