20 Most Recent HP Photosmart 120 Digital Camera Questions & Answers


You will need to use 2100 mAh or 2500 mAh rechargeable batteries, as others are not powerful enough. To format the card, look in the menu system (or, indeed, in the manual) for the 'format' command.

HP Photosmart... | Answered on Jul 09, 2017


Download one from http://h10025.www1.hp.com/ewfrf/wc/manualCategory?product=59192&cc=us&lc=en&dlc=en&product=59192

HP Photosmart... | Answered on Feb 15, 2010


AA batteries are available in four basic varieties: Alkaline Nickel-Metal Hydride (NiMH) Nickel-Cadmium (NiCad) Photo Lithium (Li-FeS2) Alkaline and photo lithium are non-rechargeable, while NiMH and NiCad are rechargeable. Each has advantages and disadvantages. Non-Rechargeable vs. Rechargeable: Rechargeable batteries are desirable from an environmental standpoint because they are reusable. Self-discharge refers to the fact that batteries lose energy when unused and even when not in a camera or other device. Rechargeable batteries tend to have relatively high self-discharge rates, approximately 1-2% per day for nickel-based batteries. Non-rechargeable batteries generally have very long shelf lives and extremely slow self-discharge rates. This makes non-rechargeable batteries a better choice for infrequent usage. Non-rechargeable batteries are available fully charged in stores all over the world, which makes them a convenient choice for travelers or customers who have dead rechargeable batteries and no time to recharge. Photo Lithium Batteries (Li-FeS2) (non-rechargeable): Photo lithium batteries will yield the longest battery life of any AA battery, surpassing NiMH by 50-100% and surpassing alkaline by 100-500%, depending on the load. While they are more expensive than alkaline batteries, their additional energy capacity makes the cost the same or less per shot than alkaline batteries. Nickel-Metal Hydride Batteries (NiMH) (rechargeable): NiMH batteries are the lowest cost overall solution for users that take a lot of pictures (more than the equivalent of a roll of film per month) or use a lot of high-power features. The largest disadvantage to NiMH batteries is their fast self-discharge rate of 1-2% per day whether the batteries are in a camera or not. NOTE: NiMH batteries need to be completely charged and discharged a few times when new to achieve their full capacity. Rechargeable batteries will eventually fail. If you have been getting acceptable battery life and then see a decrease in life, either quickly or slowly over time, a worn-out battery may be the cause. Storing or charging the batteries in high temperature conditions will accelerate this potential failure. Alkaline Batteries (non-rechargeable): Although the cheapest and easiest to find, alkaline batteries yield the worst performance of all the chemistries in a digital camera. They lose capacity at high power drains and at low temperatures. Skiers and other winter outdoor enthusiasts may find them unsatisfactory. Alkaline batteries are frequently available in two types: High drain (ultra, titanium, maximum etc.) Regular The high drain versions are a premium product designed to operate better under heavy loads than the standard product. However, there is a trend of major brands to increase the performance of their standard battery to b

HP Photosmart... | Answered on Apr 14, 2008


You do not need software for any camera. Simply connect with your USB lead and Windows Scanner/Camera Wizard does the rest.

HP Photosmart... | Answered on Aug 29, 2007


Here is the link to the manual http://h10032.www1.hp.com/ctg/Manual/bpy60553.pdf Hope you find what you need in there, if not please post again and we will see what we can do. Hope this helps :)

HP Photosmart... | Answered on Apr 05, 2007


Resolution refers to the number of pixels or dots per inch (dpi) in an image. Basically, the more dpi that a photo has, the sharper an image is. High resolution is important if you are going to be printing photos (look for a photo-capable printer that has a high resolution, say 4800 x 1200 dpi). If you’ll be e-mailing your images, you may want to save your photos at a lower resolution for faster file downloads. Digital camera resolution is measured in megapixels (1MP equals one million pixels), so the higher the MP capacity a camera has, the higher quality of images it will produce. Generally you can take good photographs with a 3MP camera.

HP Photosmart... | Answered on Sep 08, 2005


It's important to understand this difference, as you could be disappointed with the results if you use one rather than the other. Optical zoom works like the zoom on a traditional film camera. When you push the button to zoom in or out, physical lens elements move inside the camera, reducing the field of view and making the object you're shooting appear closer. Digital zoom, on the other hand, has no moving parts. The camera interpolates a small portion of an image to artificially restore the file to its original size. Using its electronic brain, the digital camera analyzes what it sees and digitally zooms in, usually two or three times closer. Unfortunately, digital zoom also reduces the resolution of an image, so your picture will tend to be more pixilated than the same image taken with an optical zoom camera. If you're just snapping an image to e-mail to a friend, this loss of resolution won't be so noticeable. But in situations where the highest quality counts, skip the digital zoom and use your PC's image-editing tools to zero in on your subject.

HP Photosmart... | Answered on Sep 08, 2005


JPEG format storage is ideal for posting your photos to the Internet and for e-mailing them to friends. (It’s also useful for archiving when you've finished editing them and need to save storage space.) The compressed images still look good on-screen and contain a relatively large amount of information in the shrunken file. JPEG storage is great for maximizing space but not for maintaining image quality. If you want to get smaller files for archiving, use minimal JPEG compression (high quality/low compression). The ideal compression is lossless, which means there's no discernible drop in image quality even though the file size has decreased.

HP Photosmart... | Answered on Sep 08, 2005


The building blocks of your image library are the actual file formats in which you save your images. There are two major formats: compressed and uncompressed. • The advantage of uncompressed storage is that you can save a maximum amount of image-forming information for color fidelity and clarity. • Compressed file formats get rid of some information to shrink the file size (thereby increasing a disk's storage capacity). We recommend saving all your work-in-progress images (equivalent to the negatives in film cameras) as TIFF files. This way they will remain at maximum quality, so you can create other versions for printing or e-mailing, and can save them in smaller, compressed files like JPEGs. The advantage is that you'll always be able to recreate an effect or enhancement by starting with the original TIFF file without losing image integrity.

HP Photosmart... | Answered on Sep 08, 2005

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