20 Most Recent Canon PowerShot A60 Digital Camera Questions & Answers


Screen is likely faulty. Buy a new camera.

Canon PowerShot... | Answered on Sep 14, 2014


This sounds like it might be a defective CCD imager. If so, Canon should fix this for you for free, including free shipping both ways. This is regardless of your camera's warranty status. Please check this link for more info.

Applicable cameras include:
A40, A60, A70, A75, A80, A85, A95, A300, A310, S1 IS, S60, S200, S230, S330, S400, S410, S500, SD100, SD110, IXUS V2/300/400/430/500, IXY Digital 30/30a/200a/300a/D320/400/ 450/500

Canon PowerShot... | Answered on Apr 09, 2014


There is definately a problem with the camera. You will want to call Canon technical support and seek repairs.

Please mark as FixYa!

Canon PowerShot... | Answered on Aug 16, 2012


Hi,

The black screen problem means the lens sensor is spoiled due to over exposure to heat. Its better to give it to cannon service centre. If your camera is under warranty period its well and good they will replace the lens sensor for free of cost.


Thank you

Canon PowerShot... | Answered on Oct 30, 2011


You've been pretty lucky. :)
I had an A75, loved it!
It lasted me about 4 years before I started to have problems. Sadly, at the time this wasn't publicised, so I wasn't aware of any free repairs.

Please take a look here, and see if there is a remedy available for your camera.
Canon issues advisory notice

It's old news, I know, but ... who knows ... eh?

Good luck.

Canon PowerShot... | Answered on Jun 28, 2011


Try NOT connecting your camera to your computer.

The best way to download pictures from your camera to your computer involves removing the memory card from the camera and plugging it into a card reader (either built-in to the computer or connected via USB or FireWire). This is likely to be faster than connecting the camera to the computer, and won't run down your camera's batteries.

Once the card is plugged in, it will appear to your computer as a removable drive. You can use the operating system's drag&drop facility to copy pictures from the card to the computer's hard drive, the same way you copy any other files. Or you can use Canon ZoomBrowser or any other photo cataloging program.

Canon PowerShot... | Answered on Apr 09, 2011


Consider NOT connecting your camera to your computer.

The best way to download pictures from your camera to your computer involves removing the memory card from the camera and plugging it into a card reader (either built-in to the computer or connected via USB or FireWire). This is likely to be faster than connecting the camera to the computer, and won't run down your camera's batteries.

Once the card is plugged in, it will appear to your computer as a removable drive. You can use the operating system's drag&drop facility to copy pictures from the card to the computer's hard drive, the same way you copy any other files. Or you can use Canon ZoomBrowser or any other photo cataloging program.

Canon PowerShot... | Answered on Apr 02, 2011


Hello

The problem is that the lens has become stuck in the barrel. There are some DIY solutions you could try, but the probability is that you will have to get it fixed by a professional.

Use these at own risk as it may further damage the camera.

Firstly , try connecting your ac adapter or usb cable.

Try holding the shutter button while switching on the camera.

Look at the lens , and if some of the lens 'circles' is misaligned or not concentric then try wiggling it (while holding camera lens down).

Try gently pushing or pulling the lens when it extends but this is risky as it may cause the lens barrel to slip out of its guidance system.

Another way to do this is to place the camera lens down on a hard surface and then power it up. Be sure to use a soft cloth or something similar as to not scratch your lens or casing. Let the lens push the camera up and down a few times and sometimes the little resistance provided by the camera is enough to get things going again.

Try hitting your camera near the lens on the body with the soft tissue on the palm of your hand.

Other than that , I would take the camera to a repair centre for a evaluation to see if it would cost more to repair than to replace the camera.

If it is still under warranty I would suggest you take it in before trying any of these steps and remove any off-brand batteries or accessories as some stores are really fussy about warranty repairs on camera's with non-brand accessories.

You can also have a look at THIS link.

Hope the advise is useful. please do not hesitate to let me know if you need any further assistance. Also, please be so kind to let me know if you found this helpful.

Regards
Andrea

Canon PowerShot... | Answered on Jan 13, 2011


This sounds like it might be a defective CCD imager, and is a known defect for your particular model camera.. If so, Canon should fix this for you for free if you live in the US, Canada, and a select few other countries. If you live outside the US, contact Canon support for your country to see if they'll still honor the advisory (some still will, especially if you stress you knowledge that this is a known defect of the camera). They may also include free shipping both ways (free shipping varies with countries). This is regardless of your camera's warranty status. Please see this link for more info.

Affected cameras with this problem include: A60, A70, A75, A80, A85, A95, A300, A310, S1 IS, S60, S400, S410, S500, SD100, SD110, IXUS V2/V3/300/400/430/500/II/IIs, IXY Digital 200a/300a/320/400/450/500/30/30a

Canon PowerShot... | Answered on Nov 25, 2010


Sorry to confirm your worst suspicions, but it's definitely shot. The ccd image sensor has failed, this is a very common and almost inevitable fault just waiting to happen on digital cameras which are over five years old but it often occurs sooner.

Your camera is now about seven years old so has lasted well. The failure certainly isn't premature in any way so there is no free repair option. In any case, 2MP sensors of the size you need simply aren't that common any more and old stock examples will also be subject to the same problem. Sensor replacement is definitely not a DIY job so even if you could find a perfect unused and guaranteed example, it would cost less to buy another camera. Even the cheapest and most basic digital compact models now far exceed the performance of your current unit in almost every way except maybe build quality and ergonomics.

There is nothing you have done to cause the fault or to prevent it. The causes of the fault are well understood these days and manufacturing and materials have improved, but because the same sized sensors are now having to work typically about six times harder the lifespan of ccd units has not improved.

Digital cameras offer many advantages over 35mm film models, but a long service life is not one of them. I hope that my reply has still been of use and that you're able to spend a moment to rate my answer.

Canon PowerShot... | Answered on Nov 25, 2010


This sounds like it might be a defective CCD imager, and is a known defect for your particular model camera.. If so, Canon should fix this for you for free if you live in the US, Canada, and a select few other countries. If you live outside the US, contact Canon support for your country to see if they'll still honor the advisory (some still will, especially if you stress you knowledge that this is a known defect of the camera). They may also include free shipping both ways (free shipping varies with countries). This is regardless of your camera's warranty status. Please see this link for more info.

Affected cameras with this problem include: A60, A70, A75, A80, A85, A95, A300, A310, S1 IS, S60, S400, S410, S500, SD100, SD110, IXUS V2/V3/300/400/430/500/II/IIs, IXY Digital 200a/300a/320/400/450/500/30/30a

Canon PowerShot... | Answered on Oct 16, 2010


Did you go back to picture taking mode or are you still in review mode?

Canon PowerShot... | Answered on Sep 28, 2010


Lens errors (E18 errors on Canons) are fairly common. Usually it's sand or grit interfering with the lens extension mechanism. Or the camera's been dropped with the lens extended. Or the camera has been powered on, but the lens had been blocked preventing its extension. Or the battery ran down with the lens extended ...
Unfortunately, many cameras that fall prey to this can only be corrected by professional repair. But, here are some things that you can do that may correct it. They only seem to work for less than 40% of the lens errors, but if the camera is out of warranty, they're worth a try.

Canon PowerShot... | Answered on Sep 27, 2010


It is sure that there is no image on to the CCD and hence there is no exposure of the shot.
It can be failure of the shutter, failure of the lens cover, being closed, or the problem with the main servo circuit of the camera,
You can removve and place battery after some time to reset the camera. if there is no result , if you are equipped then try to open and check if there arre any small errors or it might need assistance if spares are required.

Canon PowerShot... | Answered on Sep 25, 2010


Remove the card and check using the PC for any corrup files or virus , if so clean off files to a seperate folder and format the card.
Now insert into the camera and try. If the arrd wont work try to blow offf any dirt inside the carrd detecct contacts. If not try with another card to confirm the fault within the camera.

Canon PowerShot... | Answered on Sep 25, 2010


Hello

The problem is that the lens has become stuck in the barrel. There are some DIY solutions you could try, but the probability is that you will have to get it fixed by a professional.

Use these at own risk as it may further damage the camera.

Firstly , try connecting your ac adapter or usb cable.

Try holding the shutter button while switching on the camera.

Look at the lens , and if some of the lens 'circles' is misaligned or not concentric then try wiggling it (while holding camera lens down).

Try gently pushing or pulling the lens when it extends but this is risky as it may cause the lens barrel to slip out of its guidance system.

Another way to do this is to place the camera lens down on a hard surface and then power it up. Be sure to use a soft cloth or something similar as to not scratch your lens or casing. Let the lens push the camera up and down a few times and sometimes the little resistance provided by the camera is enough to get things going again.

Try hitting your camera near the lens on the body with the soft tissue on the palm of your hand.

Other than that , I would take the camera to a repair center for a evaluation to see if it would cost more to repair than to replace the camera.

If it is still under warranty I would suggest you take it in before trying any of these steps and remove any off-brand batteries or accessories as some stores are really fussy about warranty repairs on camera's with non-brand accessories.

Hope the advise is useful. please do not hesitate to let me know if you need any further assistance.

Regards
Andrea

Canon PowerShot... | Answered on Sep 15, 2010

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