20 Most Recent Toshiba PDR-M25 Digital Camera Questions & Answers


Dis you check the front lens? is it still clean and shiny?
Only clean a lens with a lens pen or tools special made for lenses. Normal cloth, and paper for sure can scratch the lens. The coating on a camera lens is very delicate and needed for the quality of every shot.

Toshiba PDR-M25... | Answered on Feb 12, 2014


This camera came out in 2001...Even Toshiba doesn't have a manual for download. Probably time to think about a new camera.

Toshiba PDR-M25... | Answered on Jul 28, 2010


Just buy a card reader and use it instead of your camera and software. 809ba4e.jpg

Toshiba PDR-M25... | Answered on Feb 18, 2010


Fixing a Lens Error on a Digital Camera

This has to be THE most common failure mode for a digital camera. Some common error messages that might show up on the LCD's of cameras with this problem include “E18 lens error”, or “lens error, restart camera”. Some cameras might show nothing at all, but merely make a beeping noise as the lens goes out, then in, then the camera shuts off. Sometimes the lens won't even move.
The problem is actually quite common throughout all camera brands. Usually it's sand or grit interfering with the lens extension mechanism. Or the camera's been dropped with the lens extended. Or the camera has been powered on, but the lens had been blocked preventing its extension. Or the battery ran down with the lens extended. Believe it or not, one BIG contributor to lens errors is using a camera case. Sand, gunk, case fibers, etc... accumulate at the bottom of the case. These materials love to cling to the camera by electrostatic build-up from the camera rubbing against the side of the case (especially those cases with soft fibrous intreriors). Once these materials work their way into the lens mechanism, that's all she wrote. I have many Canon's, and NEVER use a case for this very reason.
A camera owner that suffers this problem may have no recourse for having the camera repaired. Many camera makers will not honor repairing this problem under warranty as they claim it is due to impact damage to the camera, or sand or debris getting into the lens gearing mechanism (neither of which is covered under warranty). The quoted repair cost is usually close to or more than what the camera is actually worth.
Fortunately, about half the cameras that suffer this failure can easily be fixed by one of the following methods. None of these methods involve opening the camera, although some have potential to cause other damage to the camera if excessively done. If the camera is still under warranty, before trying any of these, please please first contact your camera's maker to see if they'll cover the repair, or to determine how much they'll charge for the repair. Who knows, you might get lucky. But if they quote you a number that's higher than the value of your camera, you may want to consider the following methods.
The methods are listed in the order of risk of damaging your camera. Thus make sure you try them in the listed order. And remember, these fixes (especially #6 and 7) should only be considered for a camera that's out of warranty, who's cost of repair would be excessive, and would otherwise be considered for disposal if unrepaired:
Fix #1: Remove the batteries from the camera, wait a few minutes. Put a fresh set of batteries back in (preferably rechargeable NiMH 2500mah or better) and turn the camera on. If that didn't work, try pressing and holding the Function or OK button while turning the camera on.
Fix #2: Remove the batteries, then remove the memory card. Then install new batteries, and turn on the camera. If you get an Error E30, it means you don't have a memory card installed, so turn it off, slip in the memory card and turn it on one last time.
Fix #3: Insert the cameras Audio/Video (AV) cable, and turn the camera on. Inserting this cable ensures that the camera's LCD screen remains off during the start process. Thus extra battery power is available to the camera's lens motor during startup. This extra power can be useful in overcoming grit or sand particals that may be jamming the lens. If the AV cable doesn't fix the lens error by itself, consider keeping this cable installed while trying fixes 4, 5, and 7 as a means to provide extra help to these fixes. But note that I DON'T recommend keeping the cable installed during Fix 6 as you may damage the AV port while tapping the camera. Reinsert the cable only AFTER tapping the camera.
Fix #4: Place the camera flat on its back on a table, pointed at the ceiling. Press and hold the shutter button down, and at the same time press the power-on button. The idea is that the camera will try to autofocus while the lens is extending, hopefully seating the lens barrel guide pins in their slots.
Fix #5: Blow compressed air in the gaps around the lens barrels with the idea of blowing out any sand or grit that may be in there jamming the lens. Other variations include blowing with a hair dryer in “no heat” setting, or sucking the gaps with a vacuum (careful with this one).
Now we're entering into the realm of potentially damaging your camera in conducting the fix. There is definitely some risk here, so take care when conducting the following two fixes.
Fix #6: Repeatedly tap the padded/rubber usb cover on a hard surface with the intent of dislodging any particles that may be jamming the lens. Other variations include hitting a side of the camera against the palm of your hand. A lot of people have reported success with this method. HOWEVER, there is also some potential for damaging or dislodging internal components with this method, such as unseating ribbon cables, or cracking LCD screens.
Fix #7: Try forcing the lens. More people have reported success with this method than with any of the other methods. HOWEVER, there's obviously some potential for damaging your camera by using this method. Variations include gently pulling, rotating, and/or twisting the lens barrel while hitting the power button. Attempt to gently straighten or align the barrel if it's crooked or twisted. Another variation includes looking for uneven gaps around the lens barrel, and then pushing on the side of the lens barrel that has the largest gap (note pushing the lens barrel all the way in is NOT recommended as it may become stuck there). While doing any of the above, listen for a click that indicates that the lens barrel guide pins may have reseated in their guide slots. If you hear this click, immediately stop and try the camera.

Toshiba PDR-M25... | Answered on Feb 08, 2010


The lens has probably got something in the retraction mechanism that is stopping it retracting. This can be something as simple as sand or grit or as a result of a drop or knock. In most cases the camera will need to be stripped apart to remove the lens assy before it can be repaired. This is best left to a professional camera repair shop.

Toshiba PDR-M25... | Answered on Jan 21, 2010


At the electronics section of most department stores. Take your camera with you to be sure to get the right size plug for the camera end.

Toshiba PDR-M25... | Answered on Nov 16, 2009


Sierra image expert 2000 is no longer produced or supported.
For more details, visit www.jasc.com.

Hope this will steer you to what you are looking for !

The Jasc Company has been bought by Corel and you can find the Jasc After Shot (Image Expert 2000) now bundled in their Corel Photo Album 6 available trial offer: -

http://download.cnet.com/Corel-Photo-Album/3000-12511_4-10181959.html

Let me know if this helps you or if you have any other questions.

Toshiba PDR-M25... | Answered on Sep 11, 2009


If the memory card is not recognized in the PC or it is impossible to access the data on it, the controller on the card is damaged. There is only one way to get the data back, unsolder memory chips and directly access their raw data with a programable chip reader. Software can't help, that is a physical damage! Have a look at: http://card-recovery.biz/us/service.php

Toshiba PDR-M25... | Answered on Mar 28, 2009


Driver can be downloaded from:

http://www.camera-drivers.com/drivers/129/129568.htm
(requires free registration).

Any good camera store should stock a suitable usb cable.

Toshiba PDR-M25... | Answered on Feb 18, 2009


Hi,

You can download it here. Scroll down a bit to find your camera.

Toshiba PDR-M25... | Answered on Jan 14, 2009


In suitcase? Checked baggage? Bad idea. Here's why. I damaged an LCD display that way. Not cracked or broken, but the baggage area is not a heated or insulated space. The temperature can reach well below -40 F (or C). Most electronics is not rated for such and my LCD on the device I put in my checked luggage shows the effect. Lesson learned firsthand....

Toshiba PDR-M25... | Answered on Sep 15, 2005


Use the resolution button on the top of the camera by the LCD display. One button is for selecting Flash. One button is for the self-timer. The middle button is for resolution. Press the button repeatedly to cycle through the options.

Toshiba PDR-M25... | Answered on Sep 15, 2005


There are several factors that can contribute to getting better focus and improved results. 1. Auto Focus / Auto Exposure lock. Press the shutter button down HALF WAY. The camera will attempt to adjust exposure to the current lighting environment for maximum benefit. Then the camera will automatically correct the focus based on objects in the center of the display. If the camera can automatically set the focus and exposure, the LED by the viewfinder will turn GREEN. If the camera can not adjust the settings automatically, the LED will turn RED. This process usually takes about two to three seconds. 2. Be sure not to cover the sensor on the front of the camera with your finger. This will disable the automatic focus and exposure controls. 3. Only us the MACRO MODE (Flower Icon) for CLOSE-UP photography. Be sure to use MACRO MODE if you are taking pictures of an object at less than six inches away. Using MACRO MODE improperly will result in poor focus. 4. Rely on the Rear LCD Display. When in doubt, trust the LCD. The LCD will display the subject more accurately than the viewfinder. This will help with "framing" the subject, or determining if you have enough light for proper exposure. 5. Motion can cause a "blur" effect. Either motion of the subject, or motion by the photographer. This phenomenon is just like traditional photography. Moving objects may appear to blur, and this will be even more evident in lower lighting situations as the shutter speed slows down to allow for more light. The shutter will react faster in bright light, and motion will not be as apparent.

Toshiba PDR-M25... | Answered on Sep 15, 2005


1. If the camera can not focus on a subject, or can not determine the appropriate exposure setting, the camera will beep and disable the shutter button. This is to avoid improper processing of the image. This is usually due to either poor lighting conditions or movement. 2. The camera Flash Element requires ten seconds to recharge between images. Although the camera is ready to continue capturing images almost immediately in bright (daylight) settings, if you are using Flash photography the Flash element will need to charge between shots. If you try to take a picture before the Flash is charged, the camera will beep and disable the shutter button. Once the Flash unit is fully charged (10 seconds), the camera is ready to continue. 3. The batteries may be running low. LCD Display, Flash, and Playback use much more power than taking pictures. It is possible to quickly consume battery power, even if you are not taking many pictures. Try turning the Mode Dial to the OFF position to recycle power. If the camera beeps and will not take a picture under normal conditions, you may need to change batteries. Please refer to the section pertaining to Battery Life.

Toshiba PDR-M25... | Answered on Sep 11, 2005


Your camera requires four AA size batteries.There are several factors that contribute to battery life: NiMH: This is the best solution for enjoyment and cost savings. NiMH batteries typically last longer per charge than the average alkaline batteries. NiMH batteries are rechargeable batteries, so they can be used several times and thereby reduce the expense of continually purchasing new batteries. NiMH batteries are typically sold with a power adapter for charging. The life of these batteries can often be determined by the mAh rating, the higher the mAh rating on the battery, the longer that they will last. NiMH batteries do not have the memory effect associated with NiCd batteries, which means that these batteries can be recharged at any time and at your convenience (you do not have to wait for the batteries to completely drain between charges). Lithium: Energizer has introduced a new series of Lithium batteries that provide optimum performance and long life for disposable AA size batteries. Laboratory studies shows that Lithium batteries last more than three times as long as standard Alkaline batteries. This means many more hours of fun and satisfaction with your digital camera. These lithium batteries are not rechargeable, they are long lasting. Alkaline: Using the LCD display, downloading images, playback, zoom and flash all require some battery power to operate and may decrease the number of shots per set of batteries. Performance may also vary based on the Alkaline batteries selected. To significantly increase battery life, be sure to turn off the LCD when it is not in use. The LCD consumes the most amount of battery power. The benefit of being able to use alkaline batteries is that you can find then almost anywhere if needed. Manganese: If you are using manganese batteries, the typical battery life will be about 2 - 5 shots. Then the camera will indicate that battery power is low and may shut-down. To avoid this experience, use either Alkaline or NiMH batteries. Optimum Solution: Use a set of NiMH batteries for longer use and to reduce the expense of continually buying new batteries. It may also be a good idea to keep a spare set of NiMH batteries for other devices that require AA size batteries on a regular basis. Use AA Alkaline batteries when the NiMH batteries need to be recharged and you want to continue enjoying the use of your camera.

Toshiba PDR-M25... | Answered on Sep 11, 2005

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