20 Most Recent Aeris Max Depth Analog 2 Gauge Console Questions & Answers


Scuba tanks can be filled well past 3200psi. When they do a hydrostatic test it is well beyond any pressure that any dive shop will fill a tank to. The highest I've seen the pressure get in my tank is 4000 and that is when the filler at the dive shop forgot about it.

Aeris Max Depth... | Answered on May 30, 2011


You may need to take it to an authorized dealer

http://www.diveaeris.com/dealers.asp

or contact aeris directly for support:
http://www.diveaeris.com/contact.html

Aeris Max Depth... | Answered on Jul 31, 2009


Pressure gauges are sealed and should not ever get bubbles in them. If there's air in the gauge, there's some possibility the Bourdon tube has a crack in it. You will spend more time dinking around with getting a bubble out and resealing the gauge than the instrument is worth. The pressure gauges on a fill station are industry standard parts and you can buy replacements off the shelf. They're not terribly expensive. Replace it.

Aeris Max Depth... | Answered on Dec 01, 2008


Scuba gauges give a diver three very important pieces of information: 1. Time 2. Depth 3. Air Consumption This information enables a diver to stay within safe time and depth limits and avoid running out of air. There are many different devices on the market to help with this, from simple gauges to complex digital consoles. Time If a diver is not using a dive computer to monitor their nitrogen, they dive according to approved dive tables. To use dive tables properly, a diver needs to track their downtime. This can be done with a good dive watch. Two things make a good dive watch: water resistance and a rotating bezel. 1. Water Resistance. Good dive watches are rated to a depth in meters or feet (e.g. 200 feet) or a pressure rating in atmospheres (e.g. 4atm). Even though most divers probably won’t dive below 130 feet (the recreational dive limit), a good dive watch should be rated to 200 feet. Note: There is a difference between “water resistance” and “waterproof”. A “waterproof” watch is what you would wear in the shower, but would probably start leaking at 15-20 feet. 2. Rotating Bezel. A bezel is an adjustable ring on the face of the dive watch with a pointer indicator. At the beginning of a dive, the pointer on the bezel is aligned with the minute hand where it stays though out the dive. At the end of the dive, you compare the difference between the bezel and the minute hand to find out the length of the dive. The bezel should only move “counterclockwise”. It is possible to accidently move the bezel during a dive. Because of this, watchmakers make sure any accidental movement will turn the time in a conservative direction, making the dive longer rather than shorter. Depth Another important part of scuba gauges is a depth gauge. A depth gauge enables a diver to keep track of their depth even if they cannot see the water’s surface. Gauges can be either an analog (needle-and-dial) device or a digital device. Both work in the same way. They measure the surrounding water pressure and convert this into an accurate reading of your depth. Another feature of a good depth gauge is a maximum depth indicator. This tells a diver their maximum during a dive and must be reset after each dive. Air Consumption Another equally important part of scuba gauges is a submersible pressure gauge (SPG). This is connected to the first stage with a high-pressure hose and measures the pressure of the air in the tank. The SPG is much like the gas gauge on a car. At the beginning of a dive, a diver starts with a full tank. This should be about 3000 psi or 200 bars. As the diver breathes during the dive, the gauge will move slowly downwards. This allows the diver to have enough air left in the tank to: 1. Make a slow, safe ascent 2. Make any necessary decompression stops 3. Inflate their BCD once at the surface 4. Breath from the regulator if the surface conditions are rough A submersible pressure gauge also allows a diver to stop diving with air still in the tank. This keeps contaminants from entering the tank due to no air pressure. Wrist Depth Gauge Scuba gauges come in two basic styles. Stand alone gauges or gauge consoles. Stand alone gauges such as a wrist mounted depth gauge or a submersible pressure gauge attached to the first stage of a regulator are great backups when using digital gauges. Gauge consoles allow divers to have all their gauges in one place. Although less easy to read, analog gauges sometimes give slightly more accurate readings than digital gauges, particularly at shallow depth. Submersible Pressure Gauge Choosing Scuba Gauges When choosing scuba gauges, remember to look for: 1. Easy-to-read numbers 2. Luminescent dial or back lighting options 3. Rotating/swivel mounting 4. Easy disassembly for cleaning or replacing parts 5. Good warranty

Aeris Max Depth... | Answered on Dec 01, 2008


"It's probably sand, rinse it well in strong running water and it should be fine. I had a compass once get sand lodged in it and prevent it's rotation, a strong rinse fixed it. Sand can only get where water travels, so if sand got there you can rinse it out with water."

Aeris Max Depth... | Answered on Dec 01, 2008


"A diver relies on scuba gauges to know three things: 1.-Depth 2.-Air Consumption 3.-Time Depth and Time are vital for nitrogen and air management. A scuba diver needs to know how deep he has been and for how long in order to judge the necessity and length of decompression stops and to calculate residual nitrogen for repetitive dives. The time of a dive is easily tracked using a scuba diving watch and the depth is tracked using a depth gauge. "

Aeris Max Depth... | Answered on Dec 01, 2008


"A diver relies on scuba gauges to know three things: 1.-Depth 2.-Air Consumption 3.-Time Depth and Time are vital for nitrogen and air management. A scuba diver needs to know how deep he has been and for how long in order to judge the necessity a

Aeris Max Depth... | Answered on Dec 01, 2008


"It's probably sand, rinse it well in strong running water and it should be fine. I had a compass once get sand lodged in it and prevent it's rotation, a strong rinse fixed it. Sand can only get where water travels, so if sand got there you can rins

Aeris Max Depth... | Answered on Dec 01, 2008


you can search online and u shld find it

Scuba Diving &... | Answered on Sep 27, 2017


Hey Candy,
I am sorry to tell you that NO ONE on fixya can help you,, we have NO WAY to find out any information of that type,, PLEASE contact the carrier AND the company that sent you the package... and your credit card company..(if that's how you paid for it!) ..and from now on - ALWAYS get something sent with SIGNATURE REQUIRED!!

Scuba Diving &... | Answered on Sep 17, 2017


the law of buoyancy is the principle that describes why some objects float over water and some others sink: when you put something in water, it receives an upword force equal to the weight of the water it displaces.
this is important in diving in many ways.. and in particular, in diving, you always want to have a neutral buoyancy: this means that if you are standing still in water and you have a neutral buyoancy, you don't sink nor come back to surface

you have a neutral buoyancy if you "displace" always the correct volume of water.. in other words, you always need to occupy about the same volume: if you go in deep water, the water pressure will "reduce" your volume, so to mantain a neutral buoyancy you have to inflate air in your buoyancy compensator jacket to expand its volume.
otherway, if you're coming back to surface, pressure reduces and your body occupies more volume, so you have to deflate your jacket.

Scuba Diving &... | Answered on Jul 30, 2017

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