Question about KTM SX 250 Motorcycles

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I need to know what to set my rebound and compression adjustments for my front and back suspension. I way 95 Kg if that needs to come into it. My bike is a 2009 Ktm 250 SX 2 Stroke

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  • skippy201284 May 21, 2011

    need to to settimgs for suspension on KTM 250 SX 2009 i weigh 95 Kg

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2 Answers

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There is simply no default setting for that - it all depends on what suspension elements you have now on the bike, what the terrain will be, and how good are you in piloting it.
It can be as simply as tightening the springs and closing the valves on all the shocks if you are just using for a gentle walk on some flat dirt roads or a complete tuneup for racing in a circuit - that would involve the replacement of the springs, valves and oil at both ends.
These basic settings for your weight are turns out from fully closed
Fork : comp 22 , rebound 15
Shock: comp 22, rebound 13
sag 115mm - 40-50mm static under load
Once you have that start tweaking them until you reach something you like. If you can't reach it then it involves either replacing springs plus removing or adding oil, or both - a complicated job, better left to an experienced repair shop

Posted on May 21, 2011

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  • Master
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Up front on the fork, "Compression" (factory set to 18). Leave it there for beginner. Turn it down as you get better (17 for novice, 15 for intermediate and 13 for pro). "Fork Rebound" (factory set to 21). Turn it up a click for more advanced riding. Otherwise, leave it alone. REAR SHOCK "Low-Speed Compression" (factory set to 15) Turn it down for advance riding ( 11-14) otherwise leave it stock. "Rebound" (factory setting is 24). Turn it up for advanced riding (25 or 26) "High-Speed Compression" (factory is 1.25) Turn it up for advanced riding (up to 1.5) "Sag" (Factory set to 110 - 113 mm) Turn it up for advance riding (113 to 120 mm). good luck
113 112-
120 109-
113

Read more: http://www.dirtrider.com/reviews/motocross/141_0901_first_test_2009_ktm_250_sxf/ktm_250_sxf_specs_settings_suspension.html#ixzz1MxEcU5bW

Posted on May 21, 2011

  • Mark T
    Mark T May 21, 2011

    Sorry,

    The springs are really stiff on a motocross bike. Your weight will only impact the "preload" on the springs. If you feel they are bottoming out during your riding, then tighten them up a bit (increase sag in back).





    As long as they are not bottoming out for your riding area and style, then your extra weight is not a problem. I only say "extra" because most pro motocrossers are about 65 kg.



    An extra 30 kg means you might want to go one or two clicks toward the more advanced settings but only do that if you feel the forks or swingarm is bottoming out when you land a jump. usually, heavier riders to not jump as high so, in the end, the workload on the suspension is about the same (or even less) than lighter riders with their higher jumps.



    No insult intended, I admit I do not know your riding style or abilities. Also, suspension is really a personal preference and you should feel free to play with various settings. There is no one "right" setting for a given weight of a rider. Start with the factory settings and adjust toward more advanced if needed. Also, if you feel you like a softer rider and are willing to sacrifice a bit of control for more comfort, you can always go softer than the factory settings too. Again, it is a personal preference and if a softer setting lets you ride longer each day, then set to what feels good for you. I like to make one adjustment at a time, then ride for a while so I really get a feel for what that adjustment did to the ride. Then set it back and adjust something else and ride some more. It takes a few days or weeks to get used to everything. Also, as you get used to the bike, you push your limits and you will need to make more adjustments because you are getting more agressive and confident.



    Good luck.



    -Mark

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1 Answer

Yamaha settings


bottom of forks turn all the way in, then back out 12 clicks
top of fork - trail riding = all the way out then turn in 2 clicks, track riding = turn in 8 clicks
Rear spring needs to be adjusted so the tip of the rear fender drops 2.75" when sitting on it.
The top adjustment (compression valve) will be close to all the way out for trail and 5 to 8 clicks turned in for track.
The bottom adjustment meters how slow or fast the shock extends (rebound). Stand on something at peg height with one foot on the peg and the other on your stand and shove the bike down. Adjust the bottom (rebound) clicker to match the front of the bike so that both return to top at the same time.
This is a good starting point for any bike.
To fine tune your suspension it is always best to have a suspension tech watch you ride and make adjustments until the chassis of the bike stays flat while the suspension does its work. Usually take a tech 20 minutes to set the front and rear compression and rebound track-side!

Jul 05, 2014 | 2003 Yamaha YZ 250 F

1 Answer

I want to adjust the suspension on my motorcycle, how do i go about doing this?


Take the bike off its stand onto level ground and stand next to it. While holding your motorcycle upright, put one foot on the foot peg next to you and press hard on it. The front and rear of the bike should squash down and raise at the same rate. If not adjust rear damping compression and rebound to compensate

Now you have a comfortable bike with adequate suspension balance. Now let’s fine tune it a bit. Again there are no tricks to setting up your rear wheel suspension, you have to understand what causes your rear suspension to work. Since rebound occurs after compression we will deal with compression first.

Aug 26, 2010 | Yamaha V Star Silverado Motorcycles

1 Answer

Factory suspension settings


Spring preload FR
To increase the spring preload and
thereby harden the suspension, turn
the adjusting bolt on each fork leg in direction
a. To decrease the spring preload
and thereby soften the
suspension, turn the adjusting bolt on
each fork leg in direction b
NOTE: _
Align the appropriate groove on the adjusting
mechanism with the top of the
front fork cap bolt.
_
CI-10E
Rebound damping force
To increase the rebound damping
force and thereby harden the rebound
damping, turn the adjusting screw on
each fork leg in direction a. To decrease
the rebound damping force and
thereby soften the rebound damping,
turn the adjusting screw on each fork
leg in direction b.
CI-02E
Compression damping force
To increase the compression damping
force and thereby harden the compression
damping, turn the adjusting screw
on each fork leg in direction a. To decrease
the compression damping force
and thereby soften the compression
damping, turn the adjusting screw on
each fork leg in direction b.
CI-02E
1. Current setting
2. Front fork cap bolt
Setting
Minimum (soft) 8
Standard 6
Maximum (hard) 1
1. Rebound damping force adjusting screw
Minimum (soft) 26 clicks in direction b*
Standard 13 clicks in direction b*
Maximum (hard) 1 click in direction b*
* With the adjusting screw fully turned in direction a
1. Compression damping force adjusting screw
Minimum (soft) 20 clicks in direction b*
Standard 13 clicks in direction b*
Maximum (hard) 1 click in direction b*
* With the adjusting screw fully turned in direction a
_
Although the total number of clicks of a
damping force adjusting mechanism
may not exactly match the above specifications
due to small differences in
production, the actual number of clicks
always represents the entire adjusting
range. To obtain a precise adjustment,
it would be advisable to check the number
of clicks of each damping force adjusting
mechanism and to modify the
specifications as necessary
CI-10E
Rebound damping force RR
To increase the rebound damping
force and thereby harden the rebound
damping, turn the adjusting screw in direction
a. To decrease the rebound
damping force and thereby soften the
rebound damping, turn the adjusting
screw in direction b.
CI-14E
Compression damping force
To increase the compression damping
force and thereby harden the compression
damping, turn the adjusting screw
in direction a. To decrease the compression
damping force and thereby
soften the compression damping, turn
the adjusting screw in direction b.
CI-14E
Setting
Minimum (soft) 1
Standard 4
Maximum (hard) 9

Whole process where need to turn toward "a" means clockwise and "b" counterclockwise. From Yamaha service manual. Hope this is good enough info to help you out. Good?

May 03, 2010 | 2002 Yamaha YZF-R1

1 Answer

Suspension **** bought vbike as is but dont no base settings


front preload - 5 lines showing

front rebound damping- stiff

front comp damping- 5 clicks out

rear preload - 15mm from top ring

rear rebound damping - 3 clicks out

rear compression damping - 7 clicks out.

something for you to start with ,when readjusting make 1 adjustment at a time and note the changes so you can go back to the starting point above

Dec 15, 2009 | 1999 kawasaki ZX-6R Ninja

1 Answer

WHAT SHOULD COMPRESSION BE FOR 04 KXF 250


Engine: Four-stroke single cylinder with DOHC, four valves
Displacement: 249cc
Bore x stroke: 77.0 x 53.6
Cooling: Liquid
Carburetion: Keihin FCR37 with hot start circuit
Ignition: Digital AC-CDI
Transmission: Five-speed with wet multi-disc manual clutch
Frame: Perimeter style, high-tensile steel with D-section upper frame rails
Suspension type, front: 48mm inverted, cartridge-type telescopic fork
Suspension adjustments, front: 16-way compression and rebound damping
Suspension type, rear: UNI-TRAK single shock system
Suspension adjustments rear: 16-way compression and rebound damping, spring preload
Wheel travel, front: 11.8 in.
Wheel travel, rear: 12.2 in.
Tire, front: 80/100-21 51M
Tire, rear: 100/90-19 57M
Brakes, front / rear: Single semi-floating 250mm disc, dual-piston / single 240mm disc, single-piston
Compression Ration: 12.6:1 ***********************
Rake/Trail: 26.5 degress/110mm
Overall length: 85.4"
Overall width: 33"
Overall height: 50"
Ground clearance: 13.4"
Seat height: 37.4"
Dry weight: 204 pounds
Wheelbase: 58"
Fuel capacity: 2.0 gal.

Jul 09, 2009 | kawasaki Full Suspension Mountain Bike Men

1 Answer

How do i adjust my rear suspension , i want to make it softer and if i make it too soft how do i make it harder again


Looking the service manual on an 04 shows two seperate adjustment screws.  One for adjusting the rebound dampening and the other for adjusting the compression dampening of your rear shock.  The front has the same set up for each side of the fork.  (2 pistons in front and 1 in back).  If you look at the top of the rear shock on the right side of the bike, you should see an adjustment screw.  That is the compression dampening screw.  You should feel a definate click when you turn the screw to let you know how much you have changed it.  Looking toward the bottom of the shock, you should see a screw labeled RBN.  That is the rebound dampening adjustment.  I would adjust the compression dampening first and then the rebound.  Compression takes care of the initial part of the bump while the rebound slows the shock on the return to neutral.  If the rebound is set to high, you will feel like the bike is trying to toss you off the bike like a bull.  If the compression is too high, you will feel like somebody is kicking you in the arse.  
Hope this helped.  You should be able to find that 04 KX 250 service manual at: http://www.repairmanualclub.com/motomanuals/ I know you have an 06, but I'm sure it's very similar.
Good Luck

Jun 10, 2009 | 2006 kawasaki KX 250 F

1 Answer

What is the maximum horsepower


It took me over an hour to find this information... Hope you enjoy it!

06/07 Gixxer 600 = Max HP 125, Max Torque 67.7
http://www.motorcyclespecs.co.za/mod...xR600%2008.htm


Suzuki claims 124 on the motor.

Dyno's range from 101 to 109.


Other Specs
Engine: 599cc,4-stroke,four-cylinder, liquid-cooled, DOHC, 16-valve*
Bore Stroke: 67.0 x 42.5mm
Compression Ratio: 12.8:1
Fuel System: Fuel Injection
Lubrication: Wet Sump
Ignition: Digital/transistorized
Transmission: 6-speed, constant mesh
Final Drive: #525 chain
Overall Length: 2040mm (80.3 in.)
Overall Width: 715mm (28.1 in.)
Overall Height: 1125mm (44.3 in.)
Seat Height: 810mm (31.9 in.)
Ground Clearance: 130mm (5.1 in.)
Wheelbase: 1400mm (55.1 in.)
Dry Weight: 163 kg (359 lbs)
Suspension Front: Cartridge-type, coil spring, fully adjustable spring preload, rebound and compression damping
Suspension Rear: Link-type, gas/oil damped, fully adjustable spring preload, 2-way adjustable compression and rebound damping
Brakes Front: Dual hydraulic disc
Brakes Rear: Single hydraulic disc
Tires Front: 120/70-ZR-17
Tires Rear: 180/55-ZR-17
Fuel Tank Capacity: 17.0 liter
Color: Blue/White, Silver/Yellow, White/Silver, Black/Matte Black

Nov 24, 2008 | 2008 Suzuki GSX-R 600

3 Answers

Yamaha yz250 suspension settings


There is too much involved to include everything, but I can describe to you what everything does.

You have compression dampening which slows the rate at which the shock or forks can compress. Then you have rebound dampening which slows the rate at which the shock or forks can extend.

The compression adjuster on the rear shock is toward the top, sticking out sideways where the resivoir mounts to the side of the shock. The rebound adjuster can be seen below the swing arm on the side of the shock.

The compression adjusters on the front forks can be seen from the top. (its the one in the center, the other is an air bleed) The rebound adjuster is in the center of the lower fork leg, and can be seen from below the fork.



The settings are measured in the number of "clicks" from seated. More clicks from seated will be softer, and less clicks from seated will be stiffer. The best thing to do is to see where you are now and adjusting from there. I like to write them down as I go. Turn the adjuster clockwise untill it stops and take note of the number of clicks. DO NOT FORCE IT! You should also check your service manual and take note of the standard setting, and also take note of the maximum number of clicks you can go from seated. You dont want to screw the adjusters out farther than the max, shock damage can result.

You might try changing to the standard settings and try adjusting from there. If the bike doesnt ride at least moderately decent at the standard settings, your shock and/or forks may need a rebuild.


Generally speaking more compression dampening in the rear will result in less bottoming but a harsher ride. Less would result in the oppisite.

More rebound dampening in the rear will result in too slow of extension and packing up which will make the bike swap in the whoops, but it will not tend to buck you or throw you into a nose dive over a jump. Less would result in the oppisite.

In the front, more compression dampening will be about the same situation as described above with the shock.

More rebound dampening in the front forks can tend to take pressure off of the front wheel in corners causing washout, but too little can make the bike want to loop out over jumps.

Nov 21, 2008 | 2003 Yamaha YZ 250

1 Answer

Adjustng the suspension


adjust your sag but i saw a pro do it with no more than 4 inches. Be sure your wearing all your gear when checking the sag. For rebound if the back of the bike is coming up and hit your butt when your on the breaks before a corner you have to much rear rebound. One good idea is to have a friend film you while you ride to see what the bike is doing. If it packs down to little rebound if it jumps up and down to much rebound. Compression will adjust how fast the shocks move in. If your at a track your suspension should bottom out on the biggest jump which should be about once a lap. Most bikes are set up to wear you don't really need to move the compression or rebound clickers. First thing have to do as I said before is to adjust your sag.

Nov 10, 2008 | 2005 KTM EXC 200

1 Answer

Adjustng the suspension


adjust your sag but i saw a pro do it with no more than 4 inches. Be sure your wearing all your gear when checking the sag. For rebound if the back of the bike is coming up and hit your butt when your on the breaks before a corner you have to much rear rebound. One good idea is to have a friend film you while you ride to see what the bike is doing. If it packs down to little rebound if it jumps up and down to much rebound. Compression will adjust how fast the shocks move in. If your at a track your suspension should bottom out on the biggest jump which should be about once a lap. Most bikes are set up to wear you don't really need to move the compression or rebound clickers. First thing have to do as I said before is to adjust your sag.

Nov 10, 2008 | 2008 HM CRE F250R

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