Question about 1981 Yamaha XJ 650

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Will carb intake mounts for an xj550 fit an xj650? The rubber inlets for the fuel/air mixture between the carb and engine has become all cracked and needs to be replaced. There are not so many to find on ebay though and I am wondering if they can be substituted.

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A direct crossover is not likely. The 650 will have a bigger bore. The part numbers are different as well. I believe I found what you need at the following website www.babbittsonline.com be sure to get new gaskets also. Please rate my answer. Thanks. Will carb intake mounts for an xj550 fit an xj650? - tombones49_140.gif

Posted on May 18, 2011

Testimonial: "Thanks again!"

  • tombones May 19, 2011

    Hey Nelson, I didn't notice that it was you who posted the question. I am glad to hear you are back on the road, (almost back anyway). I'll take a "4 thumbs up" rating when you get going again. Thanks and best wishes.

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2 Answers

My strimmer was working ok when I put it away 2 days later it won't start plenty of fuel going to carb and tried a new plug why


Carb fouled. You probably are using regular gas to mix your 2 stroke fuel...the ethanol in the gas is very bad for small engines.

Aug 28, 2016 | Motorcycles

1 Answer

Ttr230 bogging down


Hi, Honda818 engine "BOG" is mainly caused by a rich air and lean fuel condition but it can also be caused by a lean air and rich fuel condition this situation rarely occurs and is only caused by the misinformed weekend warrior that owns a toolbox.
The more you open your throttle the more vacuum you are creating in your carburetor venturi and your intake manifold. When you are operating at higher RPM any unmetered air that leaks into your system can become more obvious.
Unmetered air is air that is getting into your system after the fuel has been delivered. If you have unmetered air getting into your system between the butterfly/slide of the carburetor and the cylinder head this will create a lean condition.
All of the rubber components of the fuel system like vacuum hoses and intake manifold that you mount the carburetor to are made of rubber. If none of these components have been changed out they are more than likely highly degraded and probably cracked in places to allow unwanted-unmetered-contaminated air into the combustion chamber. Check all of your vacuum lines and vacuum plugs for carburetor synchronization. The vacuum plugs are in the head just after the rubber intake manifolds. The petcock has a vacuum line as well as part of the emission system.
1. Check the intake manifold for cracks.
2. Ensure the bands used to tighten the manifolds down on the intake are secure and have not bound up the manifold.
3. Make sure air box fittings are not warped and fit completely over the carburetor.
Your airbox is metering air and is the first step in a process of consuming air and fuel. The system requires the resistance of the air filter in order to get the proper vacuum to "SUCK" the fuel out of the float bowl and create the proper venturi effect.
Improper mounting and sealing of the airbox will create a small lean effect. This might seem like no big deal but you are inviting dust and debris in your engine that is doing slow damage by not having proper fitment. Fix it so you know it's not contributing to your issue. Pick the low hanging fruit first.
Do not go and start adjusting anything at this point. It ran fine before. There is something wrong with the assembly or a component. Do not adjust your floats. Get it back to where it was. The moment you start tweaking everything is the moment you lose OEM settings which are a must have for fine tuning and maximum performance.
Fine tuning your carburetor and multi carb syncing come at the very end following the proper procedure established by the Carburetor Gods.
For more information about your issue and valuable "FREE" downloads that you will need please click on the blue links below. Good luck and have a wonderful day.
2010 TTR230 Bog and engine dies
TTR 230 carb problem
Yamaha ttr230 Service Manual
OEM parts for Yamaha
Yamaha TT R230 Owner Manual

Jul 21, 2011 | 2007 Yamaha TTR 230

1 Answer

My 97' rm 125 after riding for half an hour starts reving uncontrollably and i think it is over heating but don't know whats wrong. The bike is bored 60 over


The description given indicates a lean fuel / air mixture. This is usually caused by rubber seals going bad between the carb and the cylinder. Air that has not gone through the carb is mixing with the air/fuel that has gone through. First check that the two air vent hoses coming from the center of the carb fit tight. Then that the carb fittings at the front of the carb are tight and that the fitting on the cylinder is tight. If the mounts are tight the seals are leaking. Replace any gaskets, "O" ring seals and rubber manifold fittings between the carb and cylinder.

Jun 06, 2011 | Suzuki RM 125 Motorcycles

1 Answer

Honda cb400 idling too high after few minutes


Air that has not gone through the carbs is getting into the fuel/air mix. This leans the mix and causes the engine to run faster and physically hotter. The normal source is hardened rubber seals on the intake manifold. Any cracks in the manifold rubber can also let in air. Try tightening all carb fittings between the carbs and the cylinder head. If that doesn't help, the seals will need to be replaced. Below is a generic diagram. Please rate my answer. Thanks.
tombones49_68.gif

Apr 12, 2011 | 1997 Honda CB 400 Four

1 Answer

I have a 2001 KTM 300 EXC with less than 500 miles. I left it sitting too long with gas in it last year and it gummed up the carburetor. I have thoroughly cleaned it and put it back on. The bike starts...


Hi, Jameswpage you may need to soak your disassembled carburetor in some "CARB DIP" Yamaha makes the best because it does not attack rubber parts like automotive carb dip and your A/F mixture screw only manages your idle circuit, that being said engine "BOG" is mainly caused by a rich air and lean fuel condition but it can also be caused by a lean air and rich fuel condition this situation rarely occurs and is only caused by the misinformed weekend warrior that owns a toolbox.
The more you open your throttle the more vacuum you are creating in your carburetor venturi and your intake manifold. When you are operating at higher RPM any unmetered air that leaks into your system can become more obvious.
Unmetered air is air that is getting into your system after the fuel has been delivered. If you have unmetered air getting into your system between the butterfly/slide of the carburetor and the cylinder head this will create a lean condition.
All of the rubber components of the fuel system like vacuum hoses and intake manifold that you mount the carburetor to are made of rubber. If none of these components have been changed out they are more than likely highly degraded and probably cracked in places to allow unwanted-unmetered-contaminated air into the combustion chamber. Check all of your vacuum lines and vacuum plugs for carburetor synchronization. The vacuum plugs are in the head just after the rubber intake manifolds. The petcock has a vacuum line as well as part of the emission system.
1. Check the intake manifold for cracks.
2. Ensure the bands used to tighten the manifolds down on the intake are secure and have not bound up the manifold.
3. Make sure air box fittings are not warped and fit completely over the carburetor.
Your airbox is metering air and is the first step in a process of consuming air and fuel. The system requires the resistance of the air filter in order to get the proper vacuum to "SUCK" the fuel out of the float bowl and create the proper venturi effect.
Improper mounting and sealing of the airbox will create a small lean effect. This might seem like no big deal but you are inviting dust and debris in your engine that is doing slow damage by not having proper fitment. Fix it so you know it's not contributing to your issue. Pick the low hanging fruit first.
Do not go and start adjusting anything at this point. It ran fine before. There is something wrong with the assembly or a component. Do not adjust your floats. Get it back to where it was. The moment you start tweaking everything is the moment you lose OEM settings which are a must have for fine tuning and maximum performance.
Fine tuning your carburetor and multi carb syncing come at the very end following the proper procedure established by the Carburetor Gods.
For more information about your issue and valuable "FREE" downloads that you will need please click on the blue links below. Good luck and have a wonderful day.
Cleaned Carb Now The Bike Bogs
EXC 250 mid throttle bog
http://service.tanga-moteurs.ro/data/KTM_Manual_engine_250_380_1999_2003_english.pdf
http://www.partsfish.com/page/oem-parts-for-ktm
KTM 300SX Owner Handbook Manual

May 22, 2017 | 2001 KTM EXC 300

1 Answer

I have a sym jet 50 basix the problem is that the carburetor screws have been tinkered with and now it seem to be runing as if it is choked and there is alot of smoke also after a short run the engine...


Lightly seat both screws then open each of them one and one half turns. This is the factory setting for Japanese bikes. Clean the air filter, install a new spark plug, I assume the Sym has a two stroke engine, mix the gas ans oil 32 to 1. That equals 4 ounces of two stroke engine oil per gallon of gas. NEVER use motor oil, only two stroke engine oil. Also, tighten all carb fittings such as mount bolts and clamps. Replace any rubber fittings if you see cracks. A cracked manifold will let air into the mixture which leans the mix and makes the idle rev upward.

Aug 11, 2010 | Sym Husky 125 Motorcycles

1 Answer

Carburator rebuild


Hi and welcome to FixYa,

Almost always, the solution is to pullout again the carbs and redo. Some ideas to consider:
  • overflow is always caused by the needle valve not closing the inlet seat;
  • too rich mixture could be caused by wrong air/fuel mixture adjustment;
  • you may also want to check how the carbs are fitted to the coupling to the engine intake as well as how the air cleaner enclosure/box fits over the carbs.
The above are just for starters. Post back result(s) or updates on any developments.

Good luck and thank you for using FixYa.



Apr 27, 2009 | 1995 Suzuki RF 900 RS - RS2

1 Answer

Cannot remove the carbs (Physically).


If you can get or cut an allen key that will fit the bolts holding the inlet manifold(the rubber things between carbs and engine)then you could try taking those off. Otherwise you may have to drop te engine.

Mar 13, 2009 | Yamaha XJR 1200 Motorcycles

1 Answer

Clean carby's


Not an easy job! I have the same bike...

- Remove the seats, the lower and both side fairing middel sections
- rRemove the fuel tank ( don't forget to close the fuel **** first ) and take care of the fuel level sensor lead
- Remove the battery leads
- Remove the 4 air filter casing bolts
- Remove the crankcase breater hose between air filter case and cylinder head cover
- Loosen the clamping bands on each end of the 4 carbs ( thus 8 bands )
- Pull the airbox to the rear and disengage the rubber joints from the 4 carbs
- Pull the carbs to the rear to disengage them from the rubber inlet-pipes.
- Move the carns to the right to have acces to loosen and disconnect the throttle cables.
- If there is an evaporative emission tube, disconnect it from the carbs, AFTER marking their place!
- Remove the carbs to the right side. That's quite difficult, there is not much place, be carefull.

to replace, just invert this way of work.
When engaging the carbs in the inlet-pipes, you have to feel them knok down at the end of the pipe fitting.
Be sure to tight the clamps correctly to avoid at 100% air leaks.
An air leak between carbs and engine will lean your mixture and will cause serious engine damage!

Mar 07, 2009 | 1986 Suzuki GSX-R 750 G

2 Answers

Kawasaki gpz 1000 rx 1987 model


Running well at high revs would indicate that all the fuel and air it needs are getting to the engine and you also have a good spark. Probably no problem with air and fuel filter ( if fitted) or sparkplugs.

Running hot, and bad idling are signs of a lean air fuel mixture. The engine is probably not getting enough fuel at low revs.

This could be caused by an air leak between the carburettors and the engine. Check that the vacuum line to the fuel tap is properly secured at both ends. It is behind the fuel line at the tap.

Get a a short length of hollow plastic tube and use it like a stethascope - put one end to your ear and move the other end around your carburettor mounts with your engine revs as low as you can get, and listen for any sucking noises that would indicate a leak. Look for cracks in the rubber inlets.

The other possibility is that there is an internal blockage in the idling jets or idling fuel circuit. This is where dirt tends to lodge because the jet dimensions and passageways are very fine - The high speed jets are much bigger and dirt often just passes straight through.

Try a little bit of choke while the engine is warm to see if you get a stronger low speed response. If so that would point to an internal blockage.

Jan 24, 2009 | 1987 kawasaki GPz 1000 RX

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